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MsAllieB

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  1. 1-Had Streisand gone for a more traditional, theatrical belting out of "People" it would have been just that, a "performance" (by a performer, playing a performer!) without the soul of the message of the song. We needed some intimacy to feel for the characters. I would however argue that this is not the most natural rendition of the song possible, some of her movements do feel a little affected, a touch choreographed, but it is certainly a tone down from her (and Brice's) typical style. 2-Eye contact, and the lack thereof are the most important moments in this song, as well as physical di
  2. Explore any common themes and filmmaking techniques in a very different movie also directed by George Cukor, Gaslight. (If you are not familiar with Gaslight, compare and contrast Cukor's theme in this scene and his techniques with another musical you have seen during this course) 1-The want to compare "MFL" against "Gaslight" is sensible in that there are matching story themes, era, setting, costume and location. Those seem like obvious comparisons, but what is more important to examine is the change in Cukor's style as a filmmaker, regardless of whether or not the themes match up. In "G
  3. Hi-yes I realized only after I posted this so I did repost in the "Gypsy" thread, I could not figure out how to erase this completely, I went to "edit" but it would only let me alter, but not erase, is there a way to delete? And thank you!
  4. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? Have you seen any Robert Preston films that are not musicals? If so, what do you notice about his characters and his approach to acting, now that you are more aware of his dedication to working his craft outside of his stage or film work? 1-Some of the most noticeable changes in the role of male musical perfor
  5. 1-The most telling clue that this scene gives us in terms of a new, or "backwards" classical musical" number is clearly the fact that we don't get to SEE a musical number. The clarinetist boy is instantly cut off, no one finishes their song or dance, no choreography, no big sing, we don't get to see a good number, or even a bad number in full, there is in fact is NO musical number...in a musical...which is on a stage...with a ton of performers..in costume, ready...to perform..."let me entertain you" but later...much later... 2-Russell's entrance is
  6. 1-The most telling clue that this scene gives us in terms of a new, or "backwards" classical musical" number is clearly the fact that we don't get to SEE a musical number. The clarinetist boy is instantly cut off, no one finishes their song or dance, no choreography, no big sing, we don't get to see a good number, or even a bad number in full, there is in fact is NO musical number...in a musical...which is on a stage...with a ton of performers..in costume, ready...to perform..."let me entertain you" but later...much later... 2-Russell's entrance is big and full, nothing is small, this is
  7. 1-The beauty and brilliance of the "American In Paris" ballet is compounded by the fact that it is purposefully set apart from the rest of the film. The reveal of the fantasy world, the "dream world" created through Jerry's painting and seen through his eyes is exactly what establishes its magic. Of course it is important to clarify that the film itself IS stylized through the eyes of Minnelli, he used a soundstage as a canvas for a Paris inspired filmic painting, but the style is separated from that of the amazing ballet closing. The ballet uses costumes, characters, and lighting as the prima
  8. 1-The "pre-dance" movements I would argue are not "pre-dance" but the beginning of the dance, they are rhythmic-stepping in time to their self created beat to the spoken word of the tongue twisters, the two characters (and might I add actors as well!) are perfectly in tune with one another, each simultaneously gets the idea of where they are going and what is about to happen. The set up is that neither actor is taking these lessons very seriously and like two cut-up kids in class, they know they are going to cause mischief and wreak havoc on the unsuspecting professor. They are literally condu
  9. 1-"Annie" in "Annie Get Your Gun" pre-dated Day's role as Jane, and years later Debbie Reynolds "Molly Brown" post-dated the role, all three very similar "backwoods gals just learnin' how to be proper like" (not to mention Eliza Doolittle was on the horizon too!) so this did become a familiar character type. No doubt the popularity of westerns was a part of this trend, and the blending of two styles, musicals and westerns, to draw a larger audience as the threat of television had come onto the horizon. These women all have a masculinity about them, but they are never truly accepted until they
  10. 1-As has been discussed, the overlying sense of the characters in this number is that they are all "buddies", they can poke fun at, and with one another, there is a sense of true friendship even if someone is taunting someone else, the ensemble feel is at the forefront. In earlier musicals we see one, maybe two characters at most interacting, solos and duets almost exclusively, but this is a group number, and even the lyric is divided to allow sharing amongst musical phrases, very unique and a trail blazing concept compared to musicals of the past. 2-Costuming is relaxed, friendly, buddie
  11. What do you notice about the way the scene is directed as Petunia goes to Joe’s bedside and as we cut to her outside hanging laundry? What does this tell us about her relationship, and the connection to the song? How would the song change if it was a woman singing about her child? Does the cultural meaning change? How? What other thoughts do you have about this film, the issues of black Americans during WWII, and this film’s importance in this era? 1-The scene is directed in a way to show Petunia's undying and unwavering support and love for her spouse, and does, if I am being
  12. 1-This number is a perfect example of choreography...not just in actor movement, but in camera, editing, and direction as well. Every part of this number is a dance (despite the fact that there is no dance!) the set is used as a character, every hall, step, bleacher and nook and cranny is used in a calculated and planned manner. Sinatra is "cornered" at all times between Garrret and the set itself, the cat has not only tracked the mouse, but knows exactly where to lead him to trap him. The song is supported by the actors, the direction, the choreo and the editing, all are in cahoots with Garre
  13. 1-I would love to have a different answer than everyone else, but let's face it, "The Wizard Of Oz" is going to be the main answer, and as well it should! Lots of things get called "classics" but I can think of no better textbook example than "Oz". What I remember most is, growing up, we did not have cable, and no VHS/DVD player at that time, so the only way you would get to see a favourite movie was to search for it in the weekly TV guide and pray it would come on. "Oz" was always shown at Christmas and I would wait all year, knowing I would get my shot at watching it, just once, over the hol
  14. 1-It is clear from the second you begin to watch, that the stately and majestic importance of the White House is at the forefront, the privilege of being inside it, Cohan taking his time up the stairs, he looks at the paintings on the wall, he notes his surroundings. He also has what appears to be an "equal" conversation with an african american man who may well have known the days of slavery but who now is inside the White House and conversing in a mature and equal way with a "national treasure", the butler recounts his seeing Cohan live and the privilege of that moment in his life, Cohan is
  15. What other aspects of battle of the sexes do you see indicated in this clip or in the film Top Hat? Although I do agree that there isn't a particularly large or overt "battle" here, especially with Fred and Ginger, we do get some slight indications that the female has more power perhaps than in other films of its time. Not just in the "Ginger wears pants and is sassy" sense ("Lovely Day") but we do have our secondary leads, Madge and Horace... I think there is much more of an overt female power battle here. Madge is totally in control, she is un-flapped by anything Horace does and knows ve
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