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Smulvihi

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About Smulvihi

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  1. I think it's a copyright issue. Danny Kaye was Paramount and I don't think TCM owns the rights to their full archive as they do with MGM, RKO, and Warner Brothers. We didn't really talk about Paramount musicals in the 1930s last week. Paramount had most of the popular radio stars in the 30s like Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Bob Hope, and Burns and Allen. Their musical boilerplates were "The Big Brodcast" movies, which they cranked the way warner brothers cranked out their Golddiggers and MGM cranked out their Broadway Melodies.
  2. I've always thought George Murphy was an underrated musical performer. He's great in Broadway Melody of 1938 and 1940 with Eleanor Powell, also in Little Miss Broadway with Shirley Temple and Step Lively with Frank Sinatra among others. He's pretty cute too, but he never seems to get the girl
  3. Not the first film I saw of hers, but the film that made me fall in love with Judy Garland was Babes in Arms (1939). I think I watched her and Mickey sing "Good Morning" three or four times before I finally got on with the rest of the movie. The penny dropped for me in the scene where she comes around the corner and sees Mickey kissing June Preisser. Her eyes well up with tears, she drops the glass of water, and runs away. I remember touching my computer screen and whispering "poor baby". At that point I developed the maternal instinct for Judy I feel most of her fans have. Mickey and Ju
  4. I think the reason Fred and Ginger's films have aged so well is because of numbers like this one (also "pick yourself up", " let yourself go", and "hard to handle"). When people tell me Ginger wasn't his best partner because she didn't have the best dancing skills (I will concede to Eleanor Powell, praise be) I tell them they are missing the point of Fred and Ginger's movies. I read an interview with Donald O'Connor once where he said that it wasn't Astaire's dancing that set him apart, it was his personality. I have seen most of Fred Astaire's movies and Ginger was the only partner who was ab
  5. The story I heard is that the reason MGM kept Judy and not Deanna is because there was a miscommunication when Louis B. Mayer said " lose the fat one". I hope that's just Hollywood lore, poor girls.
  6. The first time I saw Rose Marie was in a Canadian Studies class in undergrad. We were discussing the cultural mythology of the Mounty and its place in Canadian society. Apparently these singing Mounty movies from the thirties did a lot to create or reinforce the stereotypical portrayal of the Canadian Mounty as an honest gentlemen who is awkward with women but always gets his man, so thanks Nelson Eddy. As a Canadian, I am always fascinated by the way our country is portrayed in American popular culture. My friends and I had a good laugh over the singing Mounty song at the beginning: "if you'r
  7. 1. All I know about Florenz Ziegfeld is what I read in Irving Berlin's biography, and that was quite enough. This clip presents Ziegfeld as a gentleman who sends women flowers when in reality he used his position to coerce sexual favours out of desperate showgirls. A more realistic portrayal would have made for some uncomfortable reflection on the admittedly profound impact he had on the entertainment world, and that kind of nuance was not really 1930s MGM's forte, code or no code. 2. I actually think this clip stands in pretty stark contrast to the Depression era musicals that had been c
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