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bibbitzdad

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  1. Interesting choice of dancers to discuss; even more so than Astaire and Kelly. Ruby Keeler was a product of vaudeville; a hoofer. Eleanor Powell was a classically trained dancer, obviously from her balletic form and balance. I believe Keeler was more relatable to audiences of the early 30's. She was green, naive and not terribly polished with a charming earnestness and sweet demeaner. Powell was a workhorse. Someone once wrote of her in a discussion of Fred Astaire suggesting that he was the biggest perfectionist of dance in Hollywood, AFTER Eleanor Powell. Her taps are crisp, clean and e
  2. Okay. I've hated this movie for years. It wasn't until "Chicago" (Renee Zellweger/Catherine Zeta-Jones) that I learned to appreciate some of what is going on. A. "The Boy Friend" is a pastiche. It suggests a period and spoofs the mores and peccadillos of that period. When you see a stage production of this show, an actress gives a curtain speech explaining this and the movie lacks anything to explain this to the audience; blame Mr. Russell. By the way, it was introduced in New York in the mid-50's with Julie Andrews playing Polly. B. Ken Russell wanted a Big musical, and The Boyfriend is
  3. 1. The Lubitsch Touch (now I have Ryan O'Neal's character from "Irreconcilable Differences" in my head!) First, a grand room, a closed door and the sound of bickering. Alfred enters, breaks the fourth wall and explains that Paulette gets "jealous." A third garter, a half-hearted struggle with a gun and noise at the door."Her husband," says Alfred. We've been duped! She's jealous of her lover, NOT her husband. Suicide, 2nd try with the gun and we learn Paulette is not dead. Now that she has taught her husband a lesson, it's time to go, goodness your slow, let him do it (easily!) and out they go
  4. I think yours is a great question. The film industry, at least in Hollywood, treated anything that wasn't lilywhite as a race film, regardless of which non-white race. Interestingly, one of Louise Rainiers biggest successes was a race film, "the Good Earth" based on the novel by Pearl S. Buck. Different aspects of the industry had remarkably different perceptions of race films. The "front office" might look down on them as a necessity for building minority markets, but the writers and directors often found them inspiring, giving them a chance for artistic expression than more mainstream
  5. I like the "indifference" to money. Earlier in the film, Zeigfield reveals he is "hard up" for cash, yet he makes a joke of tipping 5 lbs. Making him broke can help him get the audience (most of whom have spent 10 cents to forget about their troubles for a few hours), establish a character trait of enjoying a gamble, and support a general air of bon vivance. The dressing room is classic hollywood fantasy: dressing rooms (even for stars) would have perhaps a third of the space Anna Held enjoys. Hothouse orchids, during a snowy London winter, would have been much worse a strain on Zeigfield's re
  6. I like the "indifference" to money. Earlier in the film, Zeigfield reveals he is "hard up" for cash, yet he makes a joke of tipping 5 lbs. Making him broke can help him get the audience (most of whom have spent 10 cents to forget about their troubles for a few hours), establish a character trait of enjoying a gamble, and support a general air of bon vivance. The dressing room is classic hollywood fantasy: dressing rooms (even for stars) would have perhaps a third of the space Anna Held enjoys. Hothouse orchids, during a snowy London winter, would have been much worse a strain on Zeigfield's re
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