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LJHUFF

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  1. 1. How might Streisand’s performance of the song “People” have felt different in the film, had she been more theatrical and expressive, perhaps even belting her song more? To me the reflective nature about what she is feeling would be lost. 2. Note the emotional transition moments in this scene: how do the two characters relate to each other as the lyrics are sung? There is a lot of physical distance between them. She is guarded by posts and stairs perhaps a representation of how she is guarding her heart as she thinks about pursuing the relationship further. She appears
  2. 1. Explore any common themes and filmmaking techniques in a very different movie also directed by George Cukor, Gaslight. (If you are not familiar with Gaslight, compare and contrast Cukor's theme in this scene and his techniques with another musical you have seen during this course) Cukor uses lavish settings for both films. Dominant male images are portrayed in both. . Things people will endure for love or money is an underlying theme.. How others can take advantage of an individual is clear. Outside influences often make a huge difference in potentially/seemingly rough situations
  3. 1. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? The masculine performances become more believable. The masculine performances open up the circle of relatability to multiple people groups of both genders. 2. What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? He is so comfortable in his own skin! He is in command of the whole stage…the whole room (or park) is his stage. He is fearless with his audience. He d
  4. 1. Does a movie that has as stylized a scene as An American in Paris’ ending ballet need to use a less-than-realistic, stylized approach throughout the film? For continuity’s sake…no…for emphasis… yes 2. What keeps Jerry Mulligan from being completely unlikeable in a scene in which he acts pretty darn unlikeable? For me it is the fact he is being true to himself as is revealed in the scene a little later. At first it seems he is cocky and self- absorbed but then he hasn’t even thought about the price of his work…it’s possible he was in doubt of any one purchasing…consid
  5. 1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements? Everything from eye movements that are in perfect rhythm, to head nods hand claps, shoulder shrugs and turn arounds…ALL are perfectly synchronized like the actual dance movements…add to the humor of the moment and prep us for the dance sequence. 2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. The professor is such a good sport. He allows himself to be subject to anything Kelly and O’ Çonnor dish out. It is fun to see him respond to the po
  6. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why? This character, Calamity Jane, ranks high in representing strength, a woman’s ability to do the things traditionally handled by men, and make changes to better her own life without compromising her ability to help others. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical? Doris Day managed to keep it real, keep it cute, and keep it fun. She was able to go from glamour to goop in a moment, from ro
  7. Daily dose #9 1. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed? Encouragement is the key word that comes to mind. Each is encouraging the other to share their ideas for a show and each gives the impression no idea is too small or dumb. Saying, Come on! Come along! When we put our heads together…look how easily we create something! I love how they build on each other’s idea to create a better story. They dance toge
  8. 1. Thinking like a director and editor, describe how each shot spotlights key action. The empty bleachers provided multiple opportunities for Sinatra to be “backed into a corner”. The viewer had plenty of time to absorb the personal battle of compliance vs resistance Sinatra portrayed (even though the scene is fast paced) because of the shot sequences…he’s cornered here…there is singing…he is cornered there…there is singing. 2. It’s interesting to examine how musicals segue into musical numbers. How does this sequence prepare us for the singing. I
  9. 1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? The first Judy Garland film, for me, was “The Wizard of Oz”. I was in my twenties before the film aired at a day and time I could view it. From her first note of “Over the rainbow” I was utterly and completely slayed. I could hardly believe the sweet intonations, and clarity of her voice. I knew her voice was a gift to us all! Her voice was one with which I could blend and harmonize which made it so personal. To this day I prefer her performances where she sings with the same sweetness
  10. 1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? The first Judy Garland film, for me, was “The Wizard of Oz”. I was in my twenties before the film aired at a day and time I could view it. From her first note of “Over the rainbow” I was utterly and completely slayed. I could hardly believe the sweet intonations, and clarity of her voice. I knew her voice was a gift to us all! Her voice was one with which I could blend and harmonize which made it so personal. To this day I prefer her performances where she sings with the same sweetness
  11. Daily dose #14 1. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? The masculine performances become more believable. The masculine performances open up the circle of relatability to multiple people groups of both genders. 2. What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? He is so comfortable in his own skin! He is in command of the whole stage…the whole room (or park) is his stage. He is fearless with
  12. Daily Dose #5 1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. The scenes in today’s daily Dose promote American values in several ways. First, there is a massive and wonderful display of known / completely recognizable American symbols of patriotism/freedom/unity (flags…on stands… and flags being waved by people of all ages, or flying high in the community…even a tiny one on Cohan’s lapel… and also red/white/blue buntings), lib
  13. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)? Wow! Once you know what you are looking for the Lubitsch Touch is easily discovered. The props and setting help me to understand the character of Alfred in many ways. As an example, the large picture on the wall of a woman scantily dressed and posed for pleasure indicates he enjoys beautiful women and isn’t inclined to mask this fact! The apartment is more ornate than one might expect for a gentleman’s home…glittering sconces,
  14. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Give specific examples. The first word that comes to mind concerning the interaction between Eddy and Macdonald is “bantering”. The two banter back and forth, in a fun way, throughout the first clip. He jibes her about helping her get to another man. He quotes poetry to help show he is equal to any competition. He jibes again with the lyrics singing “there is an angel’s breath beneath your sigh” and then there is a “devil in your eye”. In this he is calling it as he sees it. Her facial expression s
  15. I do agree the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might have been realistic for the time. A five pound tip-quite large indicating the money flows freely. ( I don't know if a pun was intended but it struck me as funny. Was he trying to be truthful in saying I'm trying to lose a little...wait...as in wait time...OR...being humorous in tying together pounds for pounds as in...weight...as in physical weight loss? Again, struck me as funny. Additionally, the settings and costumes were lavish; even the audience was in all it's finery.
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