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ClassicMovieholic

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Posts posted by ClassicMovieholic

  1. A lot of great ones have been mentioned. If I may submit my own...

    Entrance: Gale Sondergaard coming through the beaded curtain to the ethereal tune of glass Chinese wind chimes in The Letter.

    Exit: Olivia de Havilland going up the stairs in The Heiress.

    I'm assuming somebody has already mentioned Rhett disappearing into the fog in GWTW? Almost too obvious to note.

  2. 1 hour ago, NipkowDisc said:

    the prodigal is watchable all the way through and we can look forward to the enjoyment of lana's big dive into the fire pit. the beginning of Land of the Pharoahs is good but then the whole film bogs down due to joan collins' nastiness but the ending will make the whole film watchable and it does evoke a sense of claustrophobia.

    :)

    Agreed! That and the stop-motion animated vulture pit! Some creative Hays Code evasion with Lana's costuming, too😉.

    I think Land of the Pharaohs is fun camp that gets a bum rap from serious critics. Personally speaking, I am here for the Joan Collins nastiness! Nobody does it better. I agree that the ending is magnificent. Scared the bloody hell out of me when I was a kid, and still low-key obsessed with it all these years later.😲😳😱😍

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  3. 6 hours ago, DougieB said:

    Also a fan of the movie. It's one of the best historical spectacles of the 1950's, which made a specialty of them. I agree with ClassicMovieholic that it's a nice departure from the usual Greco-Roman setting. I never felt that Bella Darvi was the deal-breaker; that would be Victor Mature, whose goofy persona seemed way too contemporary. Bella Darvi fit the requirements of her role, with her slightly hypnotic, unmodulated delivery, and the hint of a lisp added to her other-worldly allure. Throw in the wigs and you have one exotic creature who could believably lure men to their doom. But in her scene at the end when she came to him for help her vulnerability seemed touchingly real. I'm also a fan of Edmund Purdom, who probably never really made it in this country because of the failure of this film and his other historical epic from the era, MGM's The Prodigal, which truly was a stinker. He seemed more relatable to me than, say, Richard Burton, who could too often veer off into bloviation.

    I just happened to notice Fathom Events upcoming schedule, with things like The Blues Brothers and Annie. What a pity that they can't seem to see the value in something from an earlier era like The Egyptian, which I'm certain could captivate a modern audience on a big theater screen.

    I thought of Darvi's final scene, too. It is indeed surprisingly moving. 

    Personally, I like Richard Burton. I find him more real and relatable than, say, Laurence Olivier, whom I would say veers more toward bloviation. I do however like Larry in his non-Shakespearean roles, but I found him so pompous and contrived in his Shakespeare productions. Burton is over the top, but I find him charismatic. Yet, I can totally see how someone would not enjoy him.

    I think The Prodigal is marginally entertaining trash, but not a movie I would want to watch all the time. I remember once reading it described as a "semi-spectacle" which stuck with me; if anything it needed to be more bloated, more ostentatious, more committed to its own silliness.

    I'd also had the thought that The Egyptian should be brought back to the big screen, and couldn't agree more! I would love to see this one and El Cid, but sadly, don't think either have a resonant enough following to make the current revival circuit. Possibly more so El Cid, but I won't hold my breath for The Egyptian.

  4. Thank you, Terrence1, for the insight about the novel. I very much enjoy the fat, historical fiction epics of the time. I read Forever Amber to pieces; another that I think is underrated as a book, but is not nearly done justice by the censorship-stunted movie.

    I can't imagine Brando in this, but may be of a minority opinion that he was miscast in these kinds of wordy historical pieces, with one exception: I like his Napoleon in Desiree, which brings me to Jean Simmons. I don't think anyone has mentioned her yet, but she's lovely in this. For an English girl, she really thrived in these dark maiden type roles.

    As for Darvi, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, as they say. I can see how her features might be a bit strong for some, but I find her quite striking. Her performance does border heavily on the side of camp, aided by the outlandish array of drag-ready wigs that TomJH and I mentioned, but it's all part of the fun. I haven't seen the film recently enough to comment seriously on the technical quality of her acting, but all I can say is I sure as hell remember her in the film! I feel if one can make such a memorable impression, they must have done something right.

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  5. In my opinion, definitely one of the most underrated epic movies, and one of my favorites of the decade. The historical accuracy and attention to detail that went into the production design (costumes, sets, etc.) is super impressive for the period. I may be in a minority that thinks Darvi was great in it. What she lacks in acting experience she makes up for in charisma and star power (though she never was a major star in the US that I'm aware of)...and those wigs! Another user commented on Gene Tierney's acting. Say what you will about her acting ability (I'm a fan, but don't remember her too vividly in this movie), her bone structure was made for this kind of costuming! And The script, while certainly not free of the hokey cliches and sword-and-sandals stereotypes that were in vogue at the time, is nonetheless taut for the genre and more cerebral than one generally expects from this kind of material. However, the pseudo-philosophical misinterpretation of Akhenaten's monotheism as a sort of proto-Christianity is dated to 1950s Western culture. Just as a matter of taste, I further find the Egyptian setting and aesthetics more interesting and appealing than the more ubiquitous Greco-Roman.

    A personal favorite of mine, even if it isn't as widely well-regarded as I feel it deserves.

    curiously, based on the only Finnish novel ever adapted for a Hollywood film. I have a copy of that dusty old bestseller of yesteryear laying around here somewhere, but regrettably haven't read it yet. Also highly regarded for its historical accuracy and attention to detail, as I recall.

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  6. 3 hours ago, Calamity said:

     

    I haven’t seen the 2008 remake but did catch a bit of The Opposite Sex once. Bailed pretty quickly. Yee-esh. I think June Allyson sometimes gets unduly harsh criticism but things really went wrong for her in that movie.

    I love the cast in the ‘39 film but do wince at some of the situations & dialogue. I think that was the intent though, as you say. Fortunately for the sisterhood there are many more Marys than Sylvias in real life but one may encounter the latter from time to time. (To paraphrase Rod Serling, “And the pity of it is, these things cannot be confined to The Women.”)

    I think Robert O. stated he didn’t care for the fashion show section. Neither do I. 1) The animals in the cages,  and, 2) the outfit with a hand for clasp. That thing creeps me out. (I think it’s in this movie.) Maybe it’s a subliminal message that we’re actually watching a horror film.

    I feel similarly about The Opposite Sex. The addition of men into the cast totally undermines the whole point. Leave it to the '50s to be like, "You know what that movie The Women needed...men." Although the 1939 film did have the tagline, "It's all about men!"😂 At least the 2008 remake stayed true to the (radical for the '30s) all-female cast concept. But as for the lackluster The Opposite Sex, Joan Collins was fun in a sort of trial run for her later career image, and there were some competent supporting actors.

    I actually think the fashion show is really cool, but I understand others find the sudden switch to technicolor, and breaking of the fourth wall jarring. I think the hand-for-clasp outfit is super badass; very Schiaparelli meets Meret Oppenheim, French avant-garde, surrealist chic!  Here are some examples of what I mean: https://www.sartle.com/blog/post/surrealist-chic-goes-to-hollywood. I like that sort of borderline grotesque inventiveness in fashion, but I totally get why it's not everybody's cup of tea.☺️

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  7. 2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

    The remake of The Women was dreadful:  really - a fat farm - that doesn't celebrate women.  Meg Ryan is not Norma Shearer and, in the original, the only outside shots were when they were on the farm.  Favorite line... Paulette Goddard, "and where I spit no grass grows."

    Again, not a fan of the remake, but I don't know that the point of either the original or the remake was necessarily celebrating women. The tone of the original can be sharply (at times even brutally) critical. Internalized misogyny, yes, the absurd lengths that women will go to to meet societal beauty standards (it's right there in the opening scene of the original), and woman-on-woman viciousness are kind of part of the point. In the words of William Makepeace Thackeray, writing about a society an ocean away and a century before Clare Boothe Luce's, but not dissimilar in many respects, "...the greatest tyrants over women are women." (Vanity Fair).

    If anything, as I began to suggest earlier, perhaps where the remake goes wrong is that it tries too hard to reinvent the story and make it empowering for women by modern standards, but is not successful at either fully committing to this attempt at a third-wave-feminist reclaiming, or honoring the eviscerating satire of the original. The original was empowering in its own way just by being fully, brutally, and unapologetically what it was. The remake couldn't decide what it wanted to be. The revival of the play with Cynthia Nixon which was broadcast on public television some years back, on the other hand, was fantastic!

    I love that line, too!😆

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  8. 3 hours ago, Calamity said:

    In The Women (original), I often end up wishing the ladies would just stay on that train and go off to have adventures. (Just bring along Little Mary. And they might have to ditch Peggy at some point.)

    A new biography of Louis Bromfield (The Rains  Came) was released this Spring. Has anyone read it? Still on hold at my library.

    I know what you mean. The "train to Reno" portion of the film is the most fun. I also find myself wishing they would just permanently settle and convert the divorcée ranch into an all-female (occasionally men-optional) commune and retreat. Peggy's a sweet kid, but you're right, the commune isn't really for her...she wouldn't be happy there. Miriam and the Countess on the other hand would keep things interesting!

    I know almost nothing about Louis Bromfield. I only know of the novel by way of the film. I would be interested to learn more about him or read some of his work.

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  9. On 9/27/2020 at 1:37 AM, TikiSoo said:

    Good points above, may I respond? 

    The problem with the morals expressed in THE GOOD EARTH are so female-subservient, I just rolled my eyes in exasperation wondering why she didn't give him the boot. It's very hard to empathize with the charactor's self-induced suffering when we do not have to, even for traditional, cultural mores.

    I imagine it was similar to THE WOMEN remake, although I haven't seen it yet. The story revolves around "pride" and honor especially, which was still around during my upbringing, so the original movie resonates for me. I figured a modern young woman would just be frustrated/angered by Mrs Stephen Haines acceptance of being her husband's appendage. (like I was angered by Rainer's charactor)

    Wholeheartedly agree on your citing THE RAINS CAME.  Although no one could beat Maria Ospenskya

    Thank you for your response. Sorry that mine is so late. I see what you mean about The Good Earth, and must also admit I haven't seen it in some years. As for what you refer to, I think I chalked it up to this story being about (as you say) traditional, cultural mores specific to pre and inter-revolutionary Chinese peasants at  a specific moment in Chinese history. Of course, it should be acknowledged that though novelist Pearl S. Buck spent much of her life in China, she was writing from a Western woman's perspective looking in on that culture. I'm not familiar with the book, but no doubt there were many cultural misunderstandings and oversimplifications, evidently even more so in the movie by the nature of the medium and the cinematic conventions of the time. While I like many aspects of the film, I certainly make allowances for it being a product of its time.

    As for the remake of The Women, I did not think it compared with the wit, style and incisive satire of either the original play or film by a long shot, but I didn't mind the seemingly anachronistic social mores you mention because this is a story about a very specific subset of women in New York high society in which (if tabloid news and Sex and the City are to be believed) women still regularly turn a blind eye to their husbands' adulteries for a comfortable spot of beachfront in the Hamptons or a charge card at Tiffany's. I think that the fact these women live in a world unrecognizable to most modern American women is part of the point; though again, didn't care for the remake and thought it was clumsy in many respects. If anything, I felt they should have gone with more of the original script (which I think is still relevant to the social circle it satirizes for the aforementioned reasons) instead of trying to both stay true to the mood and dialogue of the original while attempting (none too successfully, to your point) to update it to modern attitudes.

    As to your greater point, I hear where you're coming from, and I think we agree that outdated values can still make compelling period drama without playing fast and loose with the source material or historical era. You rightly brought up the enduring popularity of Jane Austen; though I would argue this is a special case as Jane Austen (while the social mores around which her books are centered are very much of their time) was writing with more than a share of good-natured irony and satire about those same mores. This lightly satirical tone, together with the timelessly human concerns, failings, and desires of her characters, makes her work easily adaptable through a modern lens...not to mention hilarious in the hands of a screenwriter who really gets it.  But some contemporary period pieces (The Duchess and Mad Men come to mind), show how the adept writer can translate dated cultural attitudes around class, gender, etc. to the screen without either denigrating and belittling the complexity of the characters who were obliged to navigate them (as you express frustration regarding O-Lan's female subservience), or betraying historical truth to make it more palatable to modern viewers. This is all my very longwinded way of saying that I agree with you that The Good Earth could be readapted to the screen in the hands of a careful screenwriter and production team.

    I concur that Madame Ospenskaya is incomparable, and that despite the racially insensitive casting that was the fashion of the time and not her fault at all, she does brilliantly with this part! She is every bit a QUEEN and more believable than I can imagine any other white actress of her generation having been with this material.

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  10. 8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

    The social mores of the story are definitely outdated, so a successful re-make would be tricky. (re: The WOMEN) But they successfully make modern movies of Jane Austen stories.

     

    I don't see why it couldn't work just fine as an adaptation of Pearl S. Buck's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, and a period piece presenting China at a specific historical moment. Period pieces and adaptations of period literature remain popular and commercially viable (Jane Austen, to your point), even if they don't rack up the ticket sales and accolades they did in, say, the peak of the Merchant Ivory era. Could be a better one for a TV or web miniseries in today's market, but some of the recent ones have been quite good! And the time is ripe for an all-Asian cast movie/series for the Western market, what with the recent success of Crazy Rich Asians. Would that Anna May Wong herself were still around to star in it, and finally "get her day in court," so to speak.

    Not dissimilar to my idea of a British/Indian co-production of The Rains Came with South Asian actors in the South Asian roles, which could work for big screen or TV/web, and be released in  both English and Hindi markets.

  11. 7 hours ago, slaytonf said:

    Might I suggest it is the direction by Clarence Brown that is the star of this motion picture.  His framing, his composition, his lighting.  Myrna Loy also does a good job.  One of her best performances.

    I agree that it is well-directed and handsomely photographed. And Loy is very good in it, definitely one of her best dramatic roles of the 1930s. Her final scene is one of the more moving and realistic such scenes of the studio era, when there was a risk that this kind of material could drift a bit too far toward overwrought melodrama. It is subtle and beautifully articulated, which according to Loy herself was thanks to the guidance of director Clarence Brown; so you make good points on both counts.

    In any case, it's a magnificent production with many merits, among them the Oscar-winning special effects, Brown's artful direction, the atmposhperic scenes, and Loy's fine dramatic performance. If I'd like to see a remake, it's not to the detriment of the original film; It's that I think this story still has much to offer, and would be a good vehicle for a more diverse Anglo-Indian cast than was possible in an American production of the studio era. The remake that we do have, The Rains of Ranchipur (1955), hardly satisfies on this score either.

  12. I posted this on the "Tyrone Power" thread in response to TomJH's comments on The Rains Came, but perhaps more appropriate for this thread:

     

       On 8/15/2018 at 11:31 AM,  TomJH said: 

    The real star of The Rains Came, in my opinion, is the special effects, which still dazzle.

    Power may look like a "copper Apollo" but he is hardly convincing in his role. I agree, however, that George Brent is very good.

    This is one of those ones I would care to see remade with updated casting (while I love the original and totally agree that the special effects hold up marvelously!). It would be perfect for a British/Indian co-production. Could be a lavish big-screen epic, or alternatively might play well on the small screen in light of recent developments like Indian Summers and Beecham House. Could be released for English and Hindi markets and make big money globally. The late Sushant Rajput, who played a romantic hero in the similarly themed film Kedarnath, could have stepped into Power's part; a perfect "pale copper Apollo," but sadly no longer with us. Dev Patel could maybe do it now, though IMHO he's not quite up to Tyrone and Sushant levels of dreaminess, handsome as he is. At least he's bankable. Myrna Loy's jaded society lady, languishing in her couture amidst the monsoons, would make good Keira Knightley bait. You could bring the great Sharmila Tagore out of retirement to take on Ouspenskaya's role of the stately dowager; or recast as a younger but no-less regal widow with someone internationally marketable, say Priyanka Chopra or Archie Panjabi...more of an older sister figure to Power's character or even perhaps a romantic rival to Loy's (though I should say I vastly prefer the more faithful and less Hollywoodized former option!). Pepper the secondary leads and supporting cast with a who's-who of popular and hyper-competent British period drama staples, and of course "decolonize" the cast by bringing some Bollywood talent to more prominence in the script. I see it as a glamorous period piece a la Indian Summers or The Jewel in the Crown, but could also work with a postcolonial face-lift and still be mostly relevant.

  13. On 8/15/2018 at 11:31 AM, TomJH said:

    The real star of The Rains Came, in my opinion, is the special effects, which still dazzle.

    Power may look like a "copper Apollo" but he is hardly convincing in his role. I agree, however, that George Brent is very good.

    Wrong thread, but this is one of those ones I would care to see remade with updated casting (while I love the original and totally agree that the special effects hold up marvelously!). It would be perfect for a British/Indian co-production. Could be a lavish big-screen epic, or alternatively might play well on the small screen in light of recent developments like Indian Summers and Beecham House. Could be released for English and Hindi markets and make big money globally. The late Sushant Rajput, who played a romantic hero in the similarly themed film Kedarnath, could have stepped into Power's part; a perfect "pale copper Apollo," but sadly no longer with us. Dev Patel could maybe do it now, though IMHO he's not quite up to Tyrone and Sushant levels of dreaminess, handsome as he is. At least he's bankable. Myrna Loy's jaded society lady, languishing in her couture amidst the monsoons, would make good Keira Knightley bait. You could bring the great Sharmila Tagore out of retirement to take on Ouspenskaya's role of the stately dowager; or recast as a younger but no-less regal widow with someone internationally marketable, say Priyanka Chopra or Archie Panjabi...more of an older sister figure to Power's character or even perhaps a romantic rival to Loy's (though I should say I vastly prefer the more faithful and less Hollywoodized former option!). Pepper the secondary leads and supporting cast with a who's-who of popular and hyper-competent British period drama staples, and of course "decolonize" the cast by bringing some Bollywood talent to more prominence in the script. I see it as a glamorous period piece a la Indian Summers or The Jewel in the Crown, but could also work with a postcolonial face-lift and still be mostly relevant.

  14. 44 minutes ago, TomJH said:

    One more thing, her screen tests as Scarlett O'Hara make the mouth water.

    Oh, and by the way, I completely agree about her potential as Scarlett. She's one of perhaps a handful of actresses besides Leigh who I think might have been compelling in a different way in the role, Susan Hayward and Joan Bennett among them, but Goddard way at the top of that pack! Makes one wish for alternative realities where we can see the possibilities unfold.

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  15. 10 minutes ago, TomJH said:

    I tried to get a friend of mine, who was black, to watch Ghost Breakers with me. She was stony silent while it played and I could tell by the expression of her face that she was not happy. Finally she walked out on the film, not able to take the character played by Willie Best. I respected her sensitivities, obviously coming from a different place than me, though I thought she did Best's skills as a comedian a disservice by concentrating only upon what she viewed as a racially demeaning characterization. Still, as Atticus Finch said, you have to walk around in another person's shoes to understand where they're coming from.

    I don't know your sources for Paulette Goddard's life. Yes, I know she was a free spirit and had a few relationships. But she also always remained a very private person about her personal life which was undoubtedly a very interesting one. I don't think we really know all that much about her activities away from the screen, though I do know she had a legendary jewelry collection and was an international jet setter after her film career ended, dying in her Swiss residence, probably not too far from where Chaplin had died. One more thing, her screen tests as Scarlett O'Hara make the mouth water.

    Absolutely. A choice every viewer has to make for oneself, and I certainly wouldn't try to "drive the point home." Not my place to tell a Black person how they should feel about anything. If one feels they can get past the stereotypes and see the value of the performer, great! If one feels personally hurt by it and just doesn't want to deal with the pain, totally a valid choice.

    My source is primarily the biography I mentioned, Opposite Attraction. Not sure where the author sourced their information. It was a library copy so I don't have it on hand, but I recall there was an extensive index. Admittedly there's a lot anecdotal information circulating about her out there on the web and various gossipy books, not all of it flattering, and much of it doubtless untrue or exaggerated. One thing that becomes clear at least in the way her life is presented in Opposite Attraction is that Paulette herself rewrote her own narrative so many times it was hard to keep the facts straight (her fluctuating birthdate for example). Like all the best stories, it's often hard to distinguish legend from truth. One shouldn't confidently assert the former as the latter, and that's not what I mean to do.  One can still enjoy the ride, but be sure to have the proverbial grains of salt on hand for the taking😉. My general impression is that Paulette Goddard lived the hell out of life, liked a bit of fun, and a flashy piece of jewelry as you say, and I don't begrudge her that one iota!🍻

     

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  16. 5 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

    There's a limited number of comedy plots (supposedly). And if you look at the titles of the episodes for the old time radio sitcoms, you can see how often they repeated/recycled these plots. Another common one is the housewife being put on a budget; and the kids being put on a schedule because they're always late. Another one is redecorating a room in the house which leads to some sort of disaster. 

    Don't forget trading places.😉

  17. 15 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

    Almost all the I Love Lucy episodes from the first, second  and third seasons are remakes of episodes from Ball's radio show My Favorite Husband

    So this had previously been done on MFH. 

    It was also done on both the radio and TV versions of The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet (with young Ricky being the one who supposedly can't tell the truth for a whole day).

    It was a popular comedy trope. My point is that even in 1941 it was an "old recycled" plot for Bob Hope to be using in a new big budget movie.

    I got you. I imagine George Burns and Gracie Allen did something similar, though I can't pinpoint a specific episode. That gag had probably been around since vaudeville, or even Euripides long before it trickled down to Nothing but the Truth. I'll have to see the movie for myself before I can judge it on its own merits.  I'm sure I can enjoy a bit of well-produced light comedy for what it's worth.

  18. 6 hours ago, TomJH said:

    In Ghost Breakers, once the action has been transported to the haunted castle, it's Willie Best who provides 99% of the laughs in the film (a sweet, endearing performance by Best even if his character is a racial stereotype) while Hope turns hero (even after his often cowardly activities in the first half of the film). And, like yourself, I adore Paulette Goddard, finding her during her early years at Paramount one of the most vivacious and charming of all leading ladies. I fell in love with her when, as a boy, I first saw her in Ghost Breakers. Who wouldn't want to rescue that beautiful spunky lady?

    I agree about Best, and have nothing but admiration for the great Black performers of yesteryear who made their talent, charisma, humor, and humanity shine through the demeaning stereotypes they were obliged to play to be working professionals in Hollywood. One reason I'm wary of "canceling" pop cultural artifacts that today's standards deem (often rightly so) racist; you're also canceling the legacy of these amazing performers who did the best they could with the only options they had at the time, and left some wonderful work despite what they had to face.

    On Goddard, I too developed an impossible crush on her when I watched her as a kid, and have never really shaken it! We're in good company, as many of the great geniuses of the era lost their heads over the unique, vivacious charm you describe; George Gershwin, Diego Rivera, and of course Chaplin to name just a few. There's a magnificent dual biography of Goddard and last husband Erich Maria Remarque, tracing their oft-diverging, oft-intersecting lives in the decades before and after their last-act marriage. It's called Opposite Attraction.  She had a rollicking, adventurous, whopper of a life! It reads like a modern retelling of an 18th-century picaresque novel...Moll Flanders in tennis shorts and knee-length skirts.

  19. 5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

    The problem I had with NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH is that it seemed like a sitcom plot. The type of story we've seen countless times on TV shows where someone bets the other person they can't go a whole day without lying. In fact this idea was done on radio sitcoms, so I don't think Bob Hope's writers were being too original with this particular script.

    For sure. I can think of an episode of I Love Lucy with that exact premise, and a Jim Carrey movie with a very similar one. Seems to be recycled a lot.

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  20. 6 hours ago, TomJH said:

    Hope had the opportunity to play both comedian as well as hero in his two scare comedies with Goddard while she was most appealing as spunky girl who became a lady in distress in them. Nothing But The Truth, based on a stage play, took those kinds of roles away from them, and, in doing so, denied them the opportunity to shine together as they had before. Considering the two leads I was very disappointed by this film, especially since Cat and the Canary and The Ghost Breakers are two of my favourite films, with Bob and Paulette one of my favourite screen pairings.

    Curious to see Nothing But the Truth now, but of course can't speak for it, not having seen it. I'm glad you like The Ghost Breakers and Cat and the Canary as they are two of my favorites as well! Generally I'll watch almost anything with Paulette Goddard 'cause I just find her infinitely adorable, and Bob Hope is an American treasure for all the obvious reasons. I guess I can picture what you mean about him playing "comedian as well as hero," as I was perennially frustrated by the "Road" movies for him always having to play farcical second fiddle to Bing Crosby's romantic lead straight man, when Hope seemed so much more appealing.  Fun to see him in a similar type of movie, being the hero, getting the laughs, and getting the girl!

  21. 9 hours ago, TomJH said:

    I agree that Hope and Goddard have great chemistry in those two scare comedies, though I don't think they are a particularly "unusual" screen team. Curiously, though, they went on to make a third comedy together, Nothing But The Truth, in which all that established chemistry between them in their first two films strangely disappeared.

    I guess you're right that they weren't a particularly unusual pairing. I was thinking of the funny-man/glamour-girl "beauty and the beast" kind of dynamic...but then, that's a pretty standard trope in comedy, and unlike Lou Costello, Hope was quite handsome in his early years and always played opposite beautiful leading ladies. And while Goddard was always very trim and stylish, her screen persona in those movies is not a "glamour girl" type. The Costello and Marjorie Reynolds thing made me think of it, but I guess I was drifting outside the original topic.

    I've never seen Nothing But The Truth. Could be something about the send-up and genre mixing about the scare comedies lent itself well to their dynamic, or maybe the scripts were sharper, or the director(s) knew better what to do with them. Who can say? Not to get gossipy again😏☺️, but Goddard did have a way of breaking hearts, so maybe Bob was smarting in the personal department. Purely speculation, of course.

  22. The point about Lou Costello and Marjorie Reynolds Just reminded me that Paulette Goddard and Bob Hope had delightful chemistry in the two horror-comedies they made together, The Cat and the Canary, and The Ghost Breakers. I usually kick off the coming Halloween season with one or both of those. So much humor, and such a spirit of fun between them.

    I know the OP was referring more to non-romantic pairings, but this came to mind just now.

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