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YourManGodfrey

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Everything posted by YourManGodfrey

  1. She Done Him Wrong (1933) My first Mae West film and my oldest Cary Grant film mixed into one! My main takeaway: holy sexual innuendo. The plot isn’t anything great, but the reason to stay in Mae West’s one-liners, which I assume was the goal. Grant doesn’t have a whole lot to do, but he played his part as well as he could have. The Chase (1946) I picked this, because I liked the setting of Florida/Havana and Robert Cummings. He was one of the best at playing the everyman caught up in crime and espionage. My main quibble was the plot twist about halfway through. It’s certai
  2. It’s been so long since I’ve had time to sit down and watch films. All it took was getting hit with COVID to do it! Ace of Aces (1933) Richard Dix is perhaps my favorite of the wooden pre-code actors. He’s not particularly remarkable, but he gives his role something extra. The film is actually quite good, with Ralph Bellamy also turning in a good performance. However, Elizabeth Allan was the real star in the picture. Being an actress I had never heard of in a pre-code film, I wasn’t expecting much, but she wowed me enough to write about her here. Mara Maru (1952)
  3. Atlantic City was a really good film. It surprised me when I watched it. I haven’t seen all of his films, but I love every Lancaster performance. It’s hard to find an actor that delivers his lines quite like Lancaster did. He was so intense and precise at the same time. Sweet Smell of Success with Lancaster and Curtis is some of the best acting you will ever see in film. I’ve been watching a lot of Criterion films lately, so I’m hoping to at least catch Elmer Gantry.
  4. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) I think this is a film that will require multiple viewings. This was my entry into German expressionist film and it was certainly as ridiculous as I imagined it would be. I flip flopped on whether I hated it or loved it throughout. After reading through some of the theories surrounding the plot, I feel compelled to watch the film again at some point. The Golem: How He Came into the World (1920) This was my second German expressionist film and was my favorite of the two. The score, the tinting, and the Golem are as scary as you could possibly g
  5. Monsieur Verdoux (1947) Chaplin’s sound acting is superb in this black comedy about a man that murders wealthy widows. The first half of the film is incredibly entertaining and offers some of the best dark comedic moments that you look for in these sort of films. However, as the film progresses to the second half, it becomes a bit tedious. The film falls into a rut and fails to remove itself until the final few scenes. Having not seen Chaplin outside of his shorts, I was thoroughly impressed by the way he delivered his lines throughout. He was even able to sprinkle some of his slapstick t
  6. I’m glad you’ve come to your senses. Apology accepted. On another note, Fonda has quite the tan.
  7. Cagney’s performance was actually my favorite in that film. I have only seen the film once, but Cagney’s scenes are the ones that have stuck in my head. Now, by the rules of the internet, I demand that you change your opinion! 😆
  8. The Sword of Doom (1966) Tatsuya Nadakai’s performance in this film is an all-time great performance. His eyes and facial expressions alone are worth watching for two hours. His character has no soul. His eyes are in a perpetual thousand yard stare. He only craves death and destruction. I almost avoided this film due to its title, but in retrospect, it’s a perfect title. I am left wanting to fully explore Nadakai’s filmography. I watched Harakiri a few years ago, but I don’t remember it well. Perhaps that is a good place to start my journey. What I’m trying to say is, watch this
  9. A Day’s Pleasure (1919) This is my favorite Chaplin film I have seen so far. Not only are the gags well done, but his slight facial expressions and overall acting really make the film. This is one of the better silent shorts I have seen. Death Drums Along the River (1963) I felt that the overall story was not explored at enough depth. Conclusions were seemingly pulled out of thin air and the film could have been at least another 30 minutes longer. Richard Todd plays his part brilliantly and the on-site locations are absolutely stunning. Give this one a go if you like African adv
  10. It wasn’t intended to be a 1:1 comparison of the two. I apologize if it came off that way.
  11. I usually do not post in these type of threads, because they are filled with nonsensical shouting for pages and pages. I know I am late, but I feel the need to post a response. TopBilled is a great contributor to this forum. I disagree with many of his views, but I would never want to see him banned for it. He has every right to continue posting based on his beliefs, as everyone else does. He’s not combative or malicious with his words. Gone With the Wind shouldn’t be banned for the same reason that any other film, book, or piece of art should find its place in society. Mein Kampf wa
  12. Young Mr. Jazz (1919) I’m going to assume that the score was reworked, but that is the high point of this film for me. The final “brawl in the hall” is entertaining, but the rest isn’t the best. The rhyming won’t cost you extra. However, it’s a 10 minute Harold Lloyd short, so it’s worth watching anyway. His Royal Slyness (1920) Another Hal Roach-directed Lloyd short that is an improvement over the above film. Again, the score is the real high point. I found myself tapping my foot and bouncing around to the music as Lloyd finds himself in a case of mistaken(?) identity in a for
  13. Shoulder Arms (1918) I haven’t taken to Chaplin like I have with Keaton and Linder, but I still respect him as an actor and filmmaker. I actually liked this one a lot and it’s definitely in the top half of my favorite silent films. It also features my new favorite title card: “More heroic work.” If you have ever wondered why Germany lost the war, this will answer a lot of your questions. Who could possibly take on Charlie Chaplin and win? Maybe Buster? I hear he was a great boxer. I recently subscribed to the Criterion Channel and I am overwhelmed with the amount of films that a
  14. I actually had her in my post, but I must have accidentally deleted her name.
  15. Three on a Match (1932) I’ll be honest and say that the story here isn’t really that interesting. However, the star power and pre-code brutality more than makes up for that. This film features Warren William, Ann Dvorak, Joan Blondell, Lyle Talbot, Humphrey Bogart, and small appearances by Alan Jenkins, Glenda Farrell, and Frankie Darro. This film marks the earliest Bogart film I’ve seen. His part is very small, but he comes across as menacing as ever.
  16. Cherry 2000 (1988) I was looking for a 1980s sci-fi film and I definitely found one in Cherry 2000. Everything about this film screams, “80s sci-fi!” It is also one of the worst films I have ever seen. I wanted something slightly ridiculous, but this takes ridiculous to an entirely different level. The premise of the film, trying to find a replacement sex robot, is interesting, but nothing else makes sense. Additionally, the script and acting are horrendous. If you like cult films, watch it, but that’s the only way I can possibly recommend this Mad Max fan fiction.
  17. I looked through the schedule afterwards and realized that they were showing a bunch of Ginger Rogers films, too. It’s a great film to show, because it acts as a bridge between the two tributes. I’m sure whoever suggested that at TCM got a gold star. 😆
  18. Bachelor Mother is a good one, too, with David Niven playing opposite Ginger Rogers.
  19. The Mouse That Roared (1959) As one of the great military strategists of his time, I was happy to see that a film was dedicated to Field Marshal Tully Bascomb. This biopic focuses exclusively on Bascomb’s late 1950s war service that made him into a worldwide celebrity. If you’re looking for a more full picture of his life, I would skip this one. However, if you’re looking for a great, blood and guts war film that makes Saving Private Ryan look like Singing in the Rain, look no further than The Mouse That Roared, which features noted actor Peter Sellers in the role of The Field Marshal. An
  20. The Journey (1959) I almost certain that most people could pick Yul Brynner out of a crowd, but outside of Westworld I hadn’t actually seen another Brynner film. Out of the selection of his films that TCM recently aired, this one looked the most interesting to me, so I just had to watch it. I had seen Deborah Kerr in a few other films and I wasn’t very impressed, but Kerr and Brynner put in two really good performances in this Cold War romance/drama. However, the film didn’t wow me. I didn’t hate it either, but something was missing. I felt like nothing really happened and there wasn’t mu
  21. A Shot in the Dark (1941) This is one of those mystery films where the one character explains why they caught the bad guy in the final two minutes of the film. With approximately 50 different names thrown at you inside of an hour, you’re left with crossed eyes trying to figure out who double-crossed who, and who that nameless victim was halfway through and why they were of any importance to the overall plot. William Lundigan really nailed the wise-cracking newspaperman, though.
  22. Castle on the Hudson (1940) If you put Garfield and Cagney in a film together, no one else would be able to get a line in. I’ve only seen two Garfield films now, but it’s clear that he was one of the finest actors of his generation. Looking through his films, it’s fascinating how often he is first billed early in his career. There are a few more early Garfield films floating around on TCM onDemand, so I might check those out next. I’ve been on a 50s-80s kick lately, so it was nice to jump back into the real classic Hollywood era.
  23. Blow-Up (1966) This is one of the greatest films ever made. This is a film that will keep you questioning what you just witnessed for hours and hours, pondering the opening, conclusion, and meaning of the entire thing. I honestly have very little idea what I just watched, but I have never had a film leave me in the sort of trance that I was in for nearly two hours. I could not pull myself away from the screen and I was constantly attempting to figure out what was going to happen next and why it was going to happen. This film is on TCM onDemand through the 22nd, and if you happen to watch
  24. Hopscotch is on TCM onDemand until July 6th if you use that.
  25. Hopscotch (1980) I’ve been watching a good handful of films from this era recently. I noted in my previous post that I usually don’t care for this period of film, but a few interesting films have popped up over the past handful of months; Atlantic City, Hardcore, and Hopscotch. Atlantic City Hardcore Hopscotch would be a good name for something. I’m not sure what that something is, but it’s a good name. Anyway, as far as I know, this was my introduction to Walter Matthau. It’s not an over-the-top Peter Sellers-style performance, but it’s an amusing performance in this spy comedy, which is
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