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NoShear

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  1. It was strange experiencing a pair of television sillies, Vincent Gardenia and Stuart Margolin, in the far-more-serious setting of "DEATH WISH" (1974).
  2. "Dry-cleaned" on TCM: I went to a garden party last night and found that the Marxist-Leninist horticulturalists, led by Khigh Dhiegh's proto-Wo Fat, seem to have as much relevance in today's world of Russian political dissent salting and microwave terrorism - if not more so - as when The Manchurian Candidate was originally released during THE MISSILES OF OCTOBER (1962).
  3. Two on a GuiLLoTin'e was worth the price of a Pacific Ocean Park admission. The mid-Sixties silver screen "bus tour" of Los Angeles includes an interior visit to, I think, Ciro's, which ends with a nice editing "collision" that might have got a sign-off from Sergei Eisenstein himself. There's also an appropriate name drop of The TWILIGHT ZONE - a Henry Slesar story was tapped and, despite the Max Steiner credit, occasional music passages sound like (Nathan) Van Cleave's tilted theremin in "Perchance to Dream": https://youtu.be/k4rXHuVq9f4
  4. Regarding last night's screening of Take a Giant Step (1959), I thought I'd briefly stepped out and missed lead Johnny Nash's singing of the(me) song, but apparently it's nonexistent within the movie despite an opening credit to the contrary!? Re(ggae) Johnny Nash and film, Nash's 1972 number one, "I Can See Clearly Now", was later revisited by Jimmy Cliff for and here's the original:
  5. "Mountains and the canyons start to tremble and shake Children of the sun begin to wake..." - Page/Plant Fifty years ago on this date the San Fernando earthquake and its subsequent threat posed by the Van Norman Dam(age) yields the germs for EARTHQUAKE (1974): Speaking of the Sylmar quake and germs, filming of THE OMEGA MAN (read: Charlton Heston) is curiously said to have been interrupted by the earthquake.
  6. You're welcome, TopBilled... Before leaving the De Carlo evening behind: It was interesting seeing future "CHiPs" actor Robert Pine "pulling over" Debbie Watson's character in MUNSTER, GO HOME!
  7. "It's funny how the colours of the real world only look really real when you viddy 'em on the screen." - A Clockwork Orange More especially when it was sixties TV given a silver screen sendup as is MUNSTER, GO HOME!: Butch Patrick's howlin' Wolfman getup is as purple as a Tom Wolfe prose! Yvonne De Carlo's diva approach, which Dave Karger referenced earlier in the evening with his Death of a Scoundrel intro, haunted the set of THE MUNSTERS. This, coupled with a ratings scare by a rival cathode caped character to Al Lewis' grumpy ghoul, BATMAN, nailed down the series' prim
  8. It was interesting viewing a pre-bearded Gerry Mulligan in JAZZ on a SUMMER'S DAY. Though generally associated with the "pastel" of cool jazz, Mulligan looked and sounded all fire engine red in his 1958 Newport segment:
  9. FEAR frontman Lee Ving's appearance in the 1985 take on the PARKER BROTHERS board game recalled vocalist Roger Daltrey's role in The Legacy (1978) for me.
  10. "There's something out there - I just hope it didn't see us!" For me, LOST peaked during the first episode(s) - not unlike its predecessor's child's play:
  11. I isolated only those I experienced contemporarily: 1971- THE OMEGA MAN 1981- THE DECLINE of western civilization 1991- JFK
  12. Never really got into that one. It must have seemed like forever between Pernell Roberts' departure from BONANZA and Trapper John, M.D.: A BONANZA fan friend of mine recently mentioned that had Roberts hung on to BONANZA a bit longer, he wouldn't have denied himself some serious residuals.
  13. As with viewing the MASH series, I find myself being overly conscious of the characters' dialogue within the show. It's arguably a distraction for works of screen fiction.
  14. THE WEST WING staff all sound like they possess a political science degree with a minor in screenwriting.
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