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Stallion

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Everything posted by Stallion

  1. Concerning Johnny O'Clock, I felt I was watching a text book film noir. Like The Big Sleep, sometimes plot doesn't matter to me as long as I am seeing what is film noir. I think a couple of the noirs that Eddie has had on recently almost departed from classic noir, so I was glad to watch Johnny O'Clock.
  2. The Night of the Hunter-1955 In a Lonely Place-1950 The Third Man-1949
  3. You are absolutely right. In this case, some of these actors were being given their very first opportunity to direct so I could see the temptation of wanting to appear as a real director to themselves and others. Fortunately that didn't happen much as many of the actors either got a chance to direct or write an episode. I think the reason they really did this was to get the actors extra money, in this way, because they couldn't pay them any higher as actors. I think movies are a little different, however. If Charles Laughton is directed Night of the Hunter, he probably wants to sees speci
  4. On Dallas, the cinematographer was Bob Caramico. Really sharp guy who came from filming action in WW2. All the directors on that show were wise to seek his advice. Because I am still kind of connected to the industry and even people connected with that show, I would prefer not to mention the actor.
  5. The smartest thing a director can do is to get a good cinematographer to attached themselves to. I have literally witnessed an actor given a directing opportunity continuously go to the cinematographer and say "Bob, what do you think?" A whole episode of the number one tv show in the world, during its heyday, was basically directed by the cameraman. The funny thing is I thought that was a wise move by this particular actor who was directing. He knew the cameraman had set up the shots for many years on this tv show and would know how to continue the style and be quick in its execution. To the b
  6. I know the feeling. Recently I received my Maven 10x42 binoculars and have put them to use bird watching as well looking over the hills around my home.
  7. I can think of three movies in three different areas. First, Shane for a western. I just saw it, maybe for the first time, and how can anyone not enjoy it. Next, The Dirty Dozen as a war movie. They will certainly see a lot of top stars of that era and get a glimpse of what had to be done in WW2. Last, a film noir like Out of the Past. Devious double crossing plus a few different, interesting locations.
  8. It is funny thinking of the walk/movement/presence of the three various Moose Malloys. All three were high level athletes with Bond a starting lineman on USC's first national championship team, O'Hallaran as a professional boxer and Mazurki as a professional wrestler. I like the casting of two of the three with Bond being not quite big enough or menacing enough, although John Ford at least thought Ward Bond had a big enough rear end that he often featured. I noticed that even in the one Wagon Train episode Ford directed.
  9. I think having Donna Reed step in as Miss Ellie on Dallas didn't work while Barbara Bel Geddes was ill. Donna didn't have the Miss Ellie spunk that Barbara had and the viewers were used to.
  10. I think good direction is the fact that you can say that you don't notice what the director did. As TopBilled said well, a director is like a conductor. When doing a Hollywood movie, you have the best of the craft on set and behind the scenes. A director can fine tune the effect of the script, the effect of the scenery, the effect of the acting and so on. When a movie looks believable and natural, that is a good thing. A good director will have the viewer see and hear what he ultimately wants to get across, but he has to trust his crew. When a costumer presents an idea to the director he/she h
  11. True Grit(1969) Next: Ward Bond looks the other way from John Wayne
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