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Bunderful

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About Bunderful

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  1. Meant to say, Yvonne DeCarlo always looked bi-racial to me as well. BLU
  2. To me Linda looked more Hispanic than bi-racial. She was beautiful but could be very hard-looking at times, like that Eva Mendes who was so hot a few years back, before that other Eva (Longoria) came to prominence. Or like Alice Faye. That "sweetheart" looked to me like she could really kick some butt! BLU
  3. "they didn't want to offend any black audiences because there were so few representations of people of color on the screen at the time." Are you kidding? I find most depictions of black people in old movies offensive! Hollywood sensitive to the feelings of blacks? Have you seen Birth Of A Nation? Anything with Willie Best or Stepin Fetchit? How about all those black maids who are so devoted they are ready to work for free when their employer's fortunes reversed? Who the hell works for no pay? Only under extreme pressure from the NAACP, plus the refusal of Butterfly McQueen to be overly stereotypical (eating watermelon on screen, etc.) did David O. Selznick back down on the characters in Gone With The Wind. I can think of only a handful of films offhand where black people were shown as normal, intelligent people: Out Of The Past, The Well, Lost Boundaries, Christmas in Connecticut, Bright Road, The World, The Flesh, and the Devil . . . I'm sure there are more. One undignified but (to me) hilarious performance came from Hattie McDaniel in Alice Adams. It cracks me up every time. BLU
  4. In this particular case, I'm using "unconventional" as a polite way to say, "homely." In other words, sometimes Ms. Lamour looked lovely to me, and other times she looked homely. But she always struck me as biracial-looking, more so than any other actress. I think she would have been an excellent choice for the role of Pinky. BLU
  5. Randolph Scott as Ashley Wilkes! What a marvelous casting choice. I always thought Leslie Howard too old for the part, although they did a damned good job taking off the years. BLU
  6. King Kong (if they're going to remake classics, let Peter Jackson do it. He did a marvelous recreation of Depression era New York, although of course I wasn't around to know if it was authentic, it looked like it. And what marvelous special effects!) Color doesn't mean it has to be Dick Tracy bright! Million Dollar Baby (that Clint is so much more than Dirty Harry) Crash (just marvelous) Cinderella Man (another Depression era goodie, brings the desperation of that time to light) Ray (the early scenes with his mother and that poverty broke my heart) The Road to Perdition (can still hear the theme music) Titanic (no expense spared) I have a fondness for films set in the past, particularly if they're done well. BLU
  7. The Philadelphia Story wins it for me. I didn't buy Grace Kelly and Bing Crosby, even though he later married a woman Grace's age. BTW, my favorite song from High Society was the opening number by Satchmo. BLU
  8. Francesca, I wondered the same thing and in fact started a thread. I noticed at the end of MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS that the listing of the next three movies they usually show wasn't shown. I wanted to see if the voiceover mentioned that it was the eve of Judy's birthday. Thanks, Kyle, for offering your insight as to why they showed the movies a day early. BTW, I don't really care for THE HARVEY GIRLS either (Judy and John Hodiak had zero chemistry, IMO), but I do watch the first 30 minutes because I love the way they staged the big number On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe. BLU
  9. I always felt Ethel Waters is often overlooked. She was slim in her younger days, had high cheekbones and even as late as Cabin in the Sky, aged approximately 47, she looked quite pretty. To this day I wish she had been given the lead in King Vidor's Halleluljah (sp?) that she was given serious consideration for . I believe it would have changed the perception of the darker-skinned black woman in film. Donna Reed was also quite lovely, completely believable to me as Elizabeth Taylor's older sister in The Last Time I Saw Paris. BLU
  10. So why did Betty Grable disappoint you, ClassicBlackandWhite? BLU
  11. I remember her in a movie with Jeffrey Lynn and Brenda Marshall, Money and the Woman. She played a prominent role. Also as Bette Davis' friend in In This Our Life. BLU
  12. I noticed that TCMs lineup today (Friday, June 9th) features Judy's movies one day prior to her birthday. I caught the end of Meet Me in St. Louis to see if they would mention anything about it being the eve of her birthday (actually, I wondered if somebody goofed and mixed up the date) when they announced the next three movies that would follow, but to my surprise they didn't mention the next three movies that were coming on. Did anybody else notice this? BLU
  13. Awshucks. My message didn't post the way I typed it. Sorry. BLU
  14. Awshucks. My message didn't post the way I typed it. Sorry. BLU
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