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Dub Taylor, The Dubs and Dublicious Dubbing in Dubly


CaveGirl
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Take your pick, since I'm bored and really don't care.

 

Now we all love Dub Taylor I'm sure and "Could This Be Magic" was a great tune, but my first intent was to focus on movies that had great dubbing, not only in different languages but for stars who maybe could not sing.

 

I know for many years, I was unaware that Rita Hayworth was dubbed in the vocals, and did not find that out till I was at the advanced age of about nineteen. I was surprised since the dubbing was so superior to most I'd seen that I never would have known and later found that the studio did try to keep it a well kept secret, not wanting to spoil Rita's image as a musical star. But when one can dance that well, who cares I say.

 

So your task is to bring up some great dubbing which does not have to be in Dolby, or bad dubbing or favorite scenes with Dub Taylor or even movies which contain doo **** groups that are dubbed, like the Dubs.

 

Just don't bring up any movies with the line, "Rub a dub dub, three men in a tub" since it might be offensive to some here and you will be reported.

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Can we post about the time Dub was dubbed in Dublin?

 

LOL

 

Love Dub Taylor...! His son Buck Taylor is great too.

Dub, I mean Duh!

 

I'm so stupid; it never occurred to me that Buck was Dub's son. I guess he's maybe a wee bit better looking than the Dubster.

 

Sonny boy looks more like Dean Jones.

 

Thanks for wising me up as usual, TB!

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Dub, I mean Duh!

 

I'm so stupid; it never occurred to me that Buck was Dub's son. I guess he's maybe a wee bit better looking than the Dubster.

 

Sonny boy looks more like Dean Jones.

 

Thanks for wising me up as usual, TB!

Glad I could be of help! :)

By the way, if I was still handing out Thready awards, the title of this thread would get one, along with a standing ovation at the Thready Awards Show.

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I was naively unaware for many years that several of the early James Bond films had characters that were completely dubbed with others' voices. Ursula Andress, Daniela Bianchi, Lotte Lenya, Gert Frobe as Goldfinger were all dubbed. I knew the dialogue had a "redone in post" quality, but I was surprised that it was done by different performers.

 

Oh, and 

dub-taylor-01.jpg

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I was naively unaware for many years that several of the early James Bond films had characters that were completely dubbed with others' voices. Ursula Andress, Daniela Bianchi, Lotte Lenya, Gert Frobe as Goldfinger were all dubbed. I knew the dialogue had a "redone in post" quality, but I was surprised that it was done by different performers.

 

Oh, and 

dub-taylor-01.jpg

Ain't he cool!

 

Thanks, Lawrence as I was unaware of some of that.

 

What I love is when I am watching some cheapie foreign film, maybe of horror or sci-fi origins that the voices will not have the same background sound as characters speak, probably because some are speaking in English and they leave the original background noise and then the dubbed part sounds like they are speaking in a shower stall.

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What I love is when I am watching some cheapie foreign film, maybe of horror or sci-fi origins that the voices will not have the same background sound as characters speak, probably because some are speaking in English and they leave the original background noise and then the dubbed part sounds like they are speaking in a shower stall.

Very noticeable in the Italian giallo films of the early 70s that used fading Hollywood stars who only spoke English.

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Very noticeable in the Italian giallo films of the early 70s that used fading Hollywood stars who only spoke English.

 

In Italian moviemaking, they knew that their markets were all over Europe, in a number of different languages, so they often did all sound in Post. The actors and actresses, hired from all over the globe, were simply instructed to perform in their native languages while filming. Many Hollywood stars have written of the odd feeling of delivering their lines in English, while his/her co-star responded in French or German or Spanish or whatever and the crew only spoke Italian. Sounds chaotic!

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Very noticeable in the Italian giallo films of the early 70s that used fading Hollywood stars who only spoke English.

Right on, TB!

 

Hey, I should have put an addendum on this post about films that one wishes had fake sound and dubbing.

 

One I will have to nominate is Robert Bresson's "Lancelot du Lac" from 1974 which I would like to have a show of hands for those who have seen it. During my Bresson period, I would buy up all his films on dvd, but this is one I really could have done without. I believe it has all natural sound, and you ain't heard nothing till you've heard knights from the Round Table clinking and clanking and clobbering each other while wearing chain mail.

 

The noise in the background of this film is so overwhelming that it is worse than sitting through a Saturday matinee with a bunch of screaming banshis eating popcorn and throwing things at their kiddie friends.

 

I had a really bad headache after I watched this Bresson film. It may be a masterpiece, and I will say it really made me oriented to how much sound is removed from an outdoor scene in a film, to make the speech comprehensible but still. Loud armor and swordplay can give one tinnitus for sure.

 

 

 
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In Italian moviemaking, they knew that their markets were all over Europe, in a number of different languages, so they often did all sound in Post. The actors and actresses, hired from all over the globe, were simply instructed to perform in their native languages while filming. Many Hollywood stars have written of the odd feeling of delivering their lines in English, while his/her co-star responded in French or German or Spanish or whatever and the crew only spoke Italian. Sounds chaotic!

Isn't it fun to watch the actors' mouths and see which of them are speaking English and which are not?

 

Well, maybe I should revise the word "fun" to "slightly amusing".

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Right on, TB!

 

Hey, I should have put an addendum on this post about films that one wishes had fake sound and dubbing.

 

One I will have to nominate is Robert Bresson's "Lancelot du Lac" from 1974 which I would like to have a show of hands for those who have seen it. During my Bresson period, I would buy up all his films on dvd, but this is one I really could have done without. I believe it has all natural sound, and you ain't heard nothing till you've heard knights from the Round Table clinking and clanking and clobbering each other while wearing chain mail.

 

The noise in the background of this film is so overwhelming that it is worse than sitting through a Saturday matinee with a bunch of screaming banshis eating popcorn and throwing things at their kiddie friends.

 

I had a really bad headache after I watched this Bresson film. It may be a masterpiece, and I will say it really made me oriented to how much sound is removed from an outdoor scene in a film, to make the speech comprehensible but still. Loud armor and swordplay can give one tinnitus for sure.

This reminds me of an episode of Webster I watched not long ago on Hulu. There is a kitchen scene where Susan Clark is making fresh juice. Alex Karras is sitting over at the table and she is up at the counter/ cutting board area. In the first part, she is still slicing the fruit, removing the pits and seeds. The she puts the items into the juicer and turns the appliance on. The rest of the scene, at least a good minute or more, has them speaking their dialogue over the sound of the juicer. I had never seen that before on a show.

 

Usually that type of scene ends with the actress turning the appliance on-- or there might be an interruption, like a phone call or someone else coming into the room to prevent her from flicking the switch. But they actually let her turn it on, make all that grinding noise, while the rest of the scene played. I liked it-- it added realism to the proceedings. How many times do we have conversations in real life where some of our speech does get drowned out by background noise...I thought the director took a risk that paid off. 

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This reminds me of an episode of Webster I watched not long ago on Hulu. There is a kitchen scene where Susan Clark is making fresh juice. Alex Karras is sitting over at the table and she is up at the counter/ cutting board area. In the first part, she is still slicing the fruit, removing the pits and seeds. The she puts the items into the juicer and turns the appliance on. The rest of the scene, at least a good minute or more, has them speaking their dialogue over the sound of the juicer. I had never seen that before on a show.

 

Usually that type of scene ends with the actress turning the appliance on-- or there might be an interruption, like a phone call or someone else coming into the room to prevent her from flicking the switch. But they actually let her turn it on, make all that grinding noise, while the rest of the scene played. I liked it-- it added realism to the proceedings. How many times do we have conversations in real life where some of our speech does get drowned out by background noise...I thought the director took a risk that paid off. 

It's funny you say that, TB because my original reason for buying the Bresson film was for exactly that since I'd read that he used all natural sound in the filming.

 

And I like what you are saying about a certain amount of realism, just like overlapping dialogue.

 

It is just that all good plans of mice and men occasionally go awry and in this instance what I got was not quite what I was expecting. And I'm no purist, and demand perfect sound, but seriously you have never heard so much clinks and clanks and rattling sounds in your life. I think the armor could have knocked out the sound of the blender for sure. The only thing worse would have been Alex Karras in a suit of armor, since he would probably be the loudest knight in captivity.

 

Thanks for revealing that you watch Webster. I saw my first episode the other night on Antenna. Webster had engaged the Four Tops to appear at his parents' anniversary party and I must say, that Webster was quite the little dancing star.

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It's funny you say that, TB because my original reason for buying the Bresson film was for exactly that since I'd read that he used all natural sound in the filming.

 

And I like what you are saying about a certain amount of realism, just like overlapping dialogue.

 

It is just that all good plans of mice and men occasionally go awry and in this instance what I got was not quite what I was expecting. And I'm no purist, and demand perfect sound, but seriously you have never heard so much clinks and clanks and rattling sounds in your life. I think the armor could have knocked out the sound of the blender for sure. The only thing worse would have been Alex Karras in a suit of armor, since he would probably be the loudest knight in captivity.

 

Thanks for revealing that you watch Webster. I saw my first episode the other night on Antenna. Webster had engaged the Four Tops to appear at his parents' anniversary party and I must say, that Webster was quite the little dancing star.

I think overlapping dialogue can get gimmicky-- certain directors like Altman and Welles, as much as I love them, over-do it. Overlapping dialogue should not a stylistic device, it should be used wisely and add to the scene naturally.

 

As for the juicer scene from Webster-- If you think about it, it's unrealistic for all dialogue to be heard clearly all the time.

 

And yes I'm a Webster/Emmanuel Lewis fan from way back. LOL The Four Tops appeared on three different episodes. Unfortunately Dub Taylor and his harmonica were unavailable.

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Take your pick, since I'm bored and really don't care.

 

Now we all love Dub Taylor I'm sure and "Could This Be Magic" was a great tune, but my first intent was to focus on movies that had great dubbing, not only in different languages but for stars who maybe could not sing.

 

I know for many years, I was unaware that Rita Hayworth was dubbed in the vocals, and did not find that out till I was at the advanced age of about nineteen. I was surprised since the dubbing was so superior to most I'd seen that I never would have known and later found that the studio did try to keep it a well kept secret, not wanting to spoil Rita's image as a musical star. But when one can dance that well, who cares I say.

 

So your task is to bring up some great dubbing which does not have to be in Dolby, or bad dubbing or favorite scenes with Dub Taylor or even movies which contain doo **** groups that are dubbed, like the Dubs.

 

Just don't bring up any movies with the line, "Rub a dub dub, three men in a tub" since it might be offensive to some here and you will be reported.

"Could This Be Magic" was the theme of my high school senior prom. I'm really dating myself. I even know that Richard Blandon was the lead singer of the Dubs.

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I think overlapping dialogue can get gimmicky-- certain directors like Altman and Welles, as much as I love them, over-do it. Overlapping dialogue should not a stylistic device, it should be used wisely and add to the scene naturally.

 

As for the juicer scene from Webster-- If you think about it, it's unrealistic for all dialogue to be heard clearly all the time.

 

And yes I'm a Webster/Emmanuel Lewis fan from way back. LOL The Four Tops appeared on three different episodes. Unfortunately Dub Taylor and his harmonica were unavailable.

Loved Altman's film "Short Cuts".

 

I remember wanting to see it and some well meaning [but not a film buff for sure] friend said to me "I think we need to rethink this as I've heard this film is very dark."

 

Well of course I said "That's the very reason I want to see it!"

 

Welles overlapping dialogue in "Macbeth" was fun to hear, but then all things Lady Macbeth are fun right, unless she had a dog named Spot.

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"Could This Be Magic" was the theme of my high school senior prom. I'm really dating myself. I even know that Richard Blandon was the lead singer of the Dubs.

You are dating yourself?

 

Don't most people want to date another person before resorting to such auto-m-a-s-o-c-h-i-s-m, Down?

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When I take myself home, I get a copy of Glamour Magazine, and pretend that I'm George Costanza.

I'm so sorry to hear that your mother is in the hospital.

 

Hopefully there will be no more sponge baths for her roommate this week.

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I think I mentioned before that 70's TV pitchwoman Joyce Gordon-who looked like Dustin Hoffman as Dorothy in Tootsie with glasses-dubbed one of those Italian Sons of Hercules films where she voiced the villainess in a costume made from a yard of something sheer and little else.  Her voice was immediately recognizable and you simply could not get past the contrast between the movie character and her TV persona.  I kept waiting for a slave to bring out a refrigerator sheet cake-the one where you poked holes in the cake and filled them with Jello before frosting with Cool Whip.

 

I once watched part of a Spanish version of How the West was Won.  The dubbed voices were nothing like those of the stars most of whose were so distinctive that you could recognize them without seeing the screen.  It was very strange. 

 

Maybe hearing the dialogue in your language is better than reading sub-titles but sometimes the mismatch in dubbing detracts from the enjoyment. 

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I couldn't possibly date myself.

 

I'm not my type.  ;)

 

As I also could never be "self employed", as I couldn't bear to have such an incompetent, lazy bum working for me, and I would  never wish to work for such a jerk!

 

Apologies to Groucho Marx.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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CaveGirl--Re films one Wishes had been dubbed:

 

Dub Everyone except Madeline Kahn in "At Long Last Love" (1975).  It would have been a Gift to the audiences (however few they may have numbered) who paid to see ALLL.

I think you may speak for many people with this wish, FL!

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I couldn't possibly date myself.

 

I'm not my type.  ;)

 

As I also could never be "self employed", as I couldn't bear to have such an incompetent, lazy bum working for me, and I would  never wish to work for such a jerk!

 

Apologies to Groucho Marx.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

I'm sure Groucho would be pleased that you are paying tribute to him, Sepia!

 

If you do end up working for yourself, be sure to ask for one-hour for lunch so you have time to post here.

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