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Distaff Half Psychopaths


CaveGirl
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I have to admit it, seeing women who are nutso on screen is a thrill.

 

I probably wish I could just go off on someone half as well as they do, but my tenure in Catholic School probably is just holding me back a bit. I never saw anyone even throw a punch or narrow their eyes and plan a murder plot, so I just have to live vicariously through women on the big screen, like...well of course, the great Faith Domergue.

 

Seeing that TCM is showing the old classic, "Where Danger Lives" from 1950 today in the afternoon, has made me all giddy. It also stars of course the fall guy extraordinaire, good old Mitchum. How can one man who looks so tough be taken in by all these ladies, one has to ask. But when you watch, you can of course see his fatal flaw. He's a sucker, and any old girlfriend of Howard Hughes would have him wound around her little finger in minutes, which is pretty much what happens in this film.

 

I think I first saw it when I was about eleven years old, and found it very entertaining and revealing about how to handle men. Thankfully, I have not been involved in any murders yet, but there's still time I guess. But enough about me, if you are a fan of Faith, even with her limited talents that might mean you are a fan of women psychopaths on film, so if so please share some of the ones in the movies who you think are best qualified for commitment, but not to being wed but to the insane asylum.

 

Thanks!

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I know guys who'd claim ALL women are psychopaths.  MY mother would say it's the MEN that drive them to it.

 

But being in a hurry, I'll just add NORMA DESMOND again, and the "Ma" character from WHITE HEAT for now.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Fröken Julie (Miss Julie) (1951)

 

Lissi Alandh plays Countess Berta, Julie's mother, and is certifiable.

 

When their firstborn is a daughter instead of the son the father so wanted, Berta switches all the gender roles for the workers on the estate. Women plow and harvest, while men churn butter and spin thread. She then dresses and begins raising their daughter as a boy. When father puts a stop to this, Berta burns the house down.

 

Oh yeah...

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FfMih9a.jpg

 

And speaking of crazy women in little boats...

be26b15700d4e2c9f613b6033ebd4140.jpg

 

This of course is Lizabeth Scott in TOO LATE FOR TEARS about to whack her husband Arthur Kennedy "accidentally on purpose" because her manic love of money is greater than are her feelings for her spouse.

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Glenn Close's Alex Forrest made life difficult for Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas) and his family in "Fatal Attraction" (1987). Close earned a deserved Best Actress nomination -- the fourth of her six overall Oscar nods. She is tied with Deborah Kerr and Thelma Ritter for the most nominations by an actress without a win.

 

Douglas won that year's Best Actor Oscar for Oliver Stone's "Wall Street," but it's possible that voters remembered him for this film, too. 

 

FatalAttraction.jpg

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Myrna Loy in THIRTEEN WOMEN, possibly the first time a female serial killer was depicted on screen.

Myrna was very good in this early endeavor. It seems she was great in semi-comedy thrillers like The Thin Man movies or tragic melodramas like the superb film The Rains Came. She and Tyrone Power really lit up the screen there.

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Glenn Close's Alex Forrest made life difficult for Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas) and his family in "Fatal Attraction" (1987). 

 

 

Yeah, jakeem. It's certainly hard to "ignore" Glenn's portrayal of a whack job in THIS one, isn't it!

 

(...sorry...couldn't resist) ;)

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The two women in "Diabolique" (1955).

 

 

This is what came to my mind first also.

 

I believe that: Mrs. Danvers in: Rebecca (1940) qualifies as: 'nutso.'

 

Phyllis Dietrichson in: Double Indemnity (1944) and: Matty Walker in: Body Heat (1981) are definitely manipulative and possibly sociopathic. 

 

Nikita is most definitely a bad girl in first portion of: La Femme Nikita (1990).

 

I feel that: Yuki Kashima in: Lady Snowblood (1973) can not truly be blamed for how she is because she was raised to be: psychopathic murderer. 

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Gabrielle Rodgers in "Kiss Me Deadly" (1955).

 

Katharine Hepburn in "Suddenly Last Summer" (1959).

 

The two women in "Diabolique" (1955).

Gaby Rodgers in KISS ME DEADLY -- yes! yes! I love her demented eyes. And there's no one I'd rather see lying in bed, pointing a gun at me....if you get my drift.

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This is what came to my mind first also.

 

I believe that: Mrs. Danvers in: Rebecca (1940) qualifies as: 'nutso.'

 

Phyllis Dietrichson in: Double Indemnity (1944) and: Matty Walker in: Body Heat (1981) are definitely manipulative and possibly sociopathic. 

 

Nikita is most definitely a bad girl in first portion of: La Femme Nikita (1990).

 

I feel that: Yuki Kashima in: Lady Snowblood (1973) can not truly be blamed for how she is because she was raised to be: psychopathic murderer. 

Phyllis in DOUBLE INDEMNITY was even weirder in James M. Cain's novel.

 

Carrie Snodgress gives a great performance as a psycho in MURPHY'S LAW.

 

Jane Greer is memorable in OUT OF THE PAST.

 

Mercedes McCambridge is deliciously unhinged in JOHNNY GUITAR; Joan Crawford never forgave her for walking away with the picture.

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Poor Michael Douglas runs into problems with another lover in the controversial film "Basic Instinct" (1992). This time, he's a cop involved with the flamboyant writer Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone), a key suspect in a notorious murder involving an ice pick.

 

basicinstinctdouglas.jpg

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I know guys who'd claim ALL women are psychopaths.  MY mother would say it's the MEN that drive them to it.

 

But being in a hurry, I'll just add NORMA DESMOND again, and the "Ma" character from WHITE HEAT for now.

 

 

Sepiatone

Okay, this time I am all with you adding poor, old Norma, Sepia!

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Fröken Julie (Miss Julie) (1951)

 

Lissi Alandh plays Countess Berta, Julie's mother, and is certifiable.

 

When their firstborn is a daughter instead of the son the father so wanted, Berta switches all the gender roles for the workers on the estate. Women plow and harvest, while men churn butter and spin thread. She then dresses and begins raising their daughter as a boy. When father puts a stop to this, Berta burns the house down.

 

Oh yeah...

Just rewatched it last nite and was again mesmerized!

 

Thanks, Kid.

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And speaking of crazy women in little boats...

be26b15700d4e2c9f613b6033ebd4140.jpg

 

This of course is Lizabeth Scott in TOO LATE FOR TEARS about to whack her husband Arthur Kennedy "accidentally on purpose" because her manic love of money is greater than are her feelings for her spouse.

Poor old sleazy Dan Duryea was not match for Lizbeth Scott either!

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This is what came to my mind first also.

 

I believe that: Mrs. Danvers in: Rebecca (1940) qualifies as: 'nutso.'

 

Phyllis Dietrichson in: Double Indemnity (1944) and: Matty Walker in: Body Heat (1981) are definitely manipulative and possibly sociopathic. 

 

Nikita is most definitely a bad girl in first portion of: La Femme Nikita (1990).

 

I feel that: Yuki Kashima in: Lady Snowblood (1973) can not truly be blamed for how she is because she was raised to be: psychopathic murderer. 

All great choices and I love LFN, SansFin.

 

It's funny, sometimes I think Mrs. Danvers is psycho and sometimes I think she is just totally love smitten with Rebecca and can't give it up.

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Phyllis in DOUBLE INDEMNITY was even weirder in James M. Cain's novel.

 

Carrie Snodgress gives a great performance as a psycho in MURPHY'S LAW.

 

Jane Greer is memorable in OUT OF THE PAST.

 

Mercedes McCambridge is deliciously unhinged in JOHNNY GUITAR; Joan Crawford never forgave her for walking away with the picture.

McCambridge and those blazing eyes cannot be forgotten, as you say, Lonesome!

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Yeah, jakeem. It's certainly hard to "ignore" Glenn's portrayal of a whack job in THIS one, isn't it!

 

(...sorry...couldn't resist) ;)

 

heh----

 

I'm reminded of a funny one of my NEPHEWS came up with a few years ago----

 

Our town( certain parts of it) has in recent years been inundated with jackrabbits.  While sitting on my deck and watching several of them hop all over my back yard and chew on my dwarf roses, he piped up with, "So, where's GLENN CLOSE when you need her?"  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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It's funny, sometimes I think Mrs. Danvers is psycho and sometimes I think she is just totally love smitten with Rebecca and can't give it up.

 

 

I find it bone-chilling to think that: Mrs. Danvers implies that there was at one time a: Mr. Danvers. I feel real sympathy greatly for him even although he is imaginary adjunct to fictional character. 

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I find it bone-chilling to think that: Mrs. Danvers implies that there was at one time a: Mr. Danvers. I feel real sympathy greatly for him even although he is imaginary adjunct to fictional character. 

 

Yeah, and while another character in REBECCA may not be "crazy" in the clinical sense, I always kind'a felt sorry for one Mr. Van Hopper too, Sans.

 

(...you know...the poor slob who had been married to that insufferable old bitty of a widow played by Florence Bates in that movie)

 

1b7d23f973e5b04a283bb202964ad70a.jpg

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