Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Romanticizing Malovelence


CaveGirl
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have some specific things in mind concerning Hollywood's propensity for doing such in films, but I shall let the vox populi here comment first.

 

Name a film which you think is predisposed to such predilections.

 

Sorry for all the "p" words. They just started flowing forth from my little "p"-brain.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Romantic malevolence.  That means the characters doing it for themselves, or the effect it has on audiences, or both?  Hmmm.

 

"Gun Crazy" (1949)--Are characters in love with each other, violence, or death--or all three?

 

"Bonnie and Clyde" (1967)--See above.

 

"Dracula" (1931).  Being blunt, the bites' effect is likened to ******.

 

"Rebecca" (1940)--Mrs. Danvers and her tour of Rebeccas' bedroom she gives for the nameless heroine, etc.

 

"The Phantom of the Opera" (1925)--Lon Chaney Sr. gets the idea across very well.  Claude Rains runs a distinct third in 1944's version with Susanna Foster and Nelson Eddy because he doesn't sing.

 

"Svengali" (1931)--John Barrymore fits the threads title perfectly.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Romantic malevolence.  That means the characters doing it for themselves, or the effect it has on audiences, or both?  Hmmm.

 

"Gun Crazy" (1949)--Are characters in love with each other, violence, or death--or all three?

 

"Bonnie and Clyde" (1967)--See above.

 

"Dracula" (1931).  Being blunt, the bites' effect is likened to ******.

 

"Rebecca" (1940)--Mrs. Danvers and her tour of Rebeccas' bedroom she gives for the nameless heroine, etc.

 

"The Phantom of the Opera" (1925)--Lon Chaney Sr. gets the idea across very well.  Claude Rains runs a distinct third in 1944's version with Susanna Foster and Nelson Eddy because he doesn't sing.

 

"Svengali" (1931)--John Barrymore fits the threads title perfectly.

Well, yes any of the films which feature "folie a deux" type scenarios, would definitely fit, like "Gun Crazy" and "Bonnie and Clyde".

 

These are all good choices. My rather cryptic usage of the word "romanticizing" was provoked more in a sense by something like "The Sheik", the original one from 1921 with Rudolph Valentino and Agnes Ayres, wherein the idea of the woman being subjugated by Rudy in honor of an entire cultural ethos, is made to seem very alluring, attractive and sensual. I mean, the idea of Rudy taking over in all areas might seem appealing from just watching the movie, but in real life I would suspect fans of the film who were female might not have been so crazy about a real sheik who looked like Milo O'Shea with a long beard and in robes, being their lord and master.

 

Thanks, FL!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Profuse apologies to all for my horrid spelling of the word "malevolence".

I swear I know how to spell it but things just got out of hand while I was typing the header and I did not realize it till just now in rereading the post.

 

I should be banned just for that, if for nothing else here.

My spelling looks more like an ad for a movie with Linda Lovelace.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, not banned. Maybe a seven-day suspension.

 

;)

 

There's a way to change it. I don't know it but there are plenty here who do.

 

==

 

Does Johnny Eager quality. He's not a real bad guy but he's a bit shady. It's "romanticized" in that he's a "lovable rascal" type. We like him.

 

A more dire example might be Richard III. He is vile and we don't condone his actions but we can't help liking him, at least a little. Olivier version anyway. He addresses the audience as if we were his friend. 'Course this an old play and doesn't affect us like a gritty contemporary story.

 

/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, not banned. Maybe a seven-day suspension.

 

;)

 

There's a way to change it. I don't know it but there are plenty here who do.

 

==

 

Does Johnny Eager quality. He's not a real bad guy but he's a bit shady. It's "romanticized" in that he's a "lovable rascal" type. We like him.

 

A more dire example might be Richard III. He is vile and we don't condone his actions but we can't help liking him, at least a little. Olivier version anyway. He addresses the audience as if we were his friend. 'Course this an old play and doesn't affect us like a gritty contemporary story.

 

/

Yes, of course he qualifies. I don't want my threads to be too pedantic or authoritative and accept all replies.

 

I think your Richard III, hits the mark more, in my original interpretation though. He is a scoundrel, but Olivier makes him sympathetic. That is more my meaning of "romanticizing malevolence".

 

Or something like "Kismet" where the ideas shown are so beautifully filmed that we forget the real background story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Profuse apologies to all for my horrid spelling of the word "malevolence".

I swear I know how to spell it but things just got out of hand while I was typing the header and I did not realize it till just now in rereading the post.

 

I should be banned just for that, if for nothing else here.

 

My spelling looks more like an ad for a movie with Linda Lovelace.

If you are fishing for a compliment, I'm not taking the bait.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably most Noir and '30's gangster flicks would qualify here.  More modern enties could include THE WILD BUNCH and THE GODFATHER I suppose.

 

 

And by the way------

 

Your referrence to Linda Lovelace about your thread title reminded me of something a friend of mine once said( reader discretion is advised)

 

"Calling Linda Lovelace an actress  is something I find hard to swallow!"  :D

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting though that 30s for 40s noir and gangster exhibited those rugged outlaw life styles, etc., the Code was still there to sort of keep things in order by putting a capper of how far they could go.

 

Ouch on the joke.

 

===

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the boldest example of a movie (to twist your terms somewhat) "romanticizing violence" would be A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. I do not like that film even a little- although it has certain undeniable strengths (chief among them, the brilliant performance of Malcolm MacDowell.)

 

The violence is framed very attractively, with an almost glee- contrast that to other (controversial) violent films of the 70's- TAXI DRIVER and THE FRENCH CONNECTION- where- yes, they are violent- but the violence is not packaged in a sexual, candy-coated or "romantic" view that gleefully wallows in it the way ORANGE does. The result of those films is that violence looks every bit as dark and ugly as it really is, no need for "dressing it up."

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmmmm..."Romanticizing Malevolence" ya SAY?!

 

Well, while I can't say for CERTAIN that it never happened or happens on the mean streets of NYC, but somethin's tell me the instances of a REAL bunch of juvenile delinquents in a gang ever doin' THIS in unison is probably pretty darn slim....

 

 

 

tumblr_lldl4jvczE1qclvq3.gif

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the boldest example of a movie (to twist your terms somewhat) "romanticizing violence" would be A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. I do not like that film even a little- although it has certain undeniable strengths (chief among them, the brilliant performance of Malcolm MacDowell.)

 

The violence is framed very attractively, with an almost glee- contrast that to other (controversial) violent films of the 70's- TAXI DRIVER and THE FRENCH CONNECTION- where- yes, they are violent- but the violence is not packaged in a sexual, candy-coated or "romantic" view that gleefully wallows in it the way ORANGE does. The result of those films is that violence looks every bit as dark and ugly as it really is, no need for "dressing it up."

 

I dislike CLOCKWORK too but not for so good reasons as you explain here. I've become squeamish watching graphic violence whether gratuitous or no. It does me good to read what you say about it, it's a perverse pleasure because I don't have 'critical' reasons of my own. Consequently I feel a guilty pleasure is seeing it put down, ha. I like your take on it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dislike CLOCKWORK too but not for so good reasons as you explain here. I've become squeamish watching graphic violence whether gratuitous or no. It does me good to read what you say about it, it's a perverse pleasure because I don't have 'critical' reasons of my own. Consequently I feel a guilty pleasure is seeing it put down, ha. I like your take on it.

...and I like your style.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are fishing for a compliment, I'm not taking the bait.

Okay, I'll admit it, I just spelled it that way, Down knowing that subliminally if the header made you think of Linda Lovelace that you would read my thread.

 

You caught me red-handed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the boldest example of a movie (to twist your terms somewhat) "romanticizing violence" would be A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. I do not like that film even a little- although it has certain undeniable strengths (chief among them, the brilliant performance of Malcolm MacDowell.)

 

The violence is framed very attractively, with an almost glee- contrast that to other (controversial) violent films of the 70's- TAXI DRIVER and THE FRENCH CONNECTION- where- yes, they are violent- but the violence is not packaged in a sexual, candy-coated or "romantic" view that gleefully wallows in it the way ORANGE does. The result of those films is that violence looks every bit as dark and ugly as it really is, no need for "dressing it up."

Yes, you are so right, Lorna and I had not even thought of that one.

 

The ultra-violence as the Droogies call it, is played out like a beautifully choreographed ballet, and even the horrid scene with Alex attacking the wife, has him singing the old standard, "Singing in the Rain" which is confusing to the senses. The movie does give process to conflicting emotions which are also mirrored in Alex's reaction to the Ludovico Technique, wherein the the drug makes him nauseated to the gorgeous strains of Beethoven whilst watching scenes of violence on film, that are supposed to cure him of his anti-social behaviour.

 

Sorry for all my extrapolating, which looks like I just checked IMDB, but "Clockwork Orange" was the basis of my thesis paper in college for a course called "Science Fiction and Religion" and having seen the film like ten times for it, I have most of it memorized.

 

Thanks so much for reminding me that it too does fit the nomenclature of my original post idea, with your excellent expose!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...