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Kitchen Sink Realism


CaveGirl
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This Sunday, TCM will be showing one of the foremost films extolling the filmic style of Kitchen Sink Realism with "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning" starring Albert Finney.

 

The term came into use in England, firstly to describe the art of John Bratby who found painting such objects of household non-allure, most exhilirating. Being that he was also considered one of Britain's angry young men [another term which had taken hold of the consciousness there] the phrase also came to describe films of such mundane surface ugliness, which mirrored society.

 

Written by Allan Sillitoe, who was also responsible for "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner", the film was directed by the talented Karel Reisz, who later directed "The French Lieutenant's Woman" amongst other triumphs.
 

26 Sunday     8:15 AM SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING (1960)  

A factory worker lives for the chance to have fun on the weekends.

DirKarel Reisz Cast:  Albert Finney , Shirley Field , Rachel Roberts .

BW-90 mins, CC,

 

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Absolutely love the British New Wave films!  I believe "Alfie" and "Georgy Girl" are two of the most popular and the last of the genre.  

 

Also love one of the lesser known films; "A Smashing Time" starring Lynn Redgrave, before her turn in "Georgy Girl" and the pin-up girl of the New Wave; Rita Tushingham.

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Absolutely love the British New Wave films!  I believe "Alfie" and "Georgy Girl" are two of the most popular and the last of the genre.  

 

Also love one of the lesser known films; "A Smashing Time" starring Lynn Redgrave, before her turn in "Georgy Girl" and the pin-up girl of the New Wave; Rita Tushingham.

Those are all wonderful evocations of swinging London and in the hinterlands too.

 

My favorite scene in "Alfie" is when he gives the baby a chocolate bar and its mouth looks all blackened. Oh, also when Shelley Winters unceremoniously dumps him, in her apartment graced with the Vladimir Tretchikoff print, of his painting "The Green Lady".

 

Thanks, John!

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Although it's rightly counted in the "Brit noir" category, IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY (how's that for a downbeat title?) actually has a scene with Googie Withers at the kitchen sink.

 

WOMAN IN A DRESSING GOWN (which I haven't seen) is sometimes named as a key film in this genre.

 

Some other titles which come to mind:

 

A TASTE OF HONEY

THE ANGRY SILENCE

THE L-SHAPED ROOM

THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER

BILLY LIAR

THE GIRL WITH GREEN EYES

ROOM AT THE TOP

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The only trouble with these wonderful films is understanding what they are saying. I like the DVDs to have English subtitles for the English dialogue.

 

That strikes me as a bit of cheap shot.  Kes strikes me as the only movie that actually tries to get how working class people actually talk.  And it's about a decade after the British "New Wave" started, and it's considerably tougher.  It's also far more admired nowadays than the BNW, much of which looks rather stodgy.

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I've never seen Kes (1969-UK), but I have seen another Ken Loach film.  From 1971.  I believe the original title was "Wednesday's Child", but I bought a used Columbia VHS release of it over 20 years ago from a low-rent video shop under the title "Family Life".  Stars Sandy Ratcliff, Grace Cave, Bill Dean and Malcolm Tierney.  Don't expect happy stuff here, but I found it to be well worth watching.  I've watched the tape 3 times.  It could be on DVD now, I reckon.  It's filmed in a docu-drama style, btw.   

 

     A KIND OF LOVING (1962) is another British kitchen-sink drama. 

 

     Has anyone mentioned 1959's LOOK BACK IN ANGER?  Even the 1960 Richard Todd/Peter Sellers movie NEVER LET GO has some kitchen-sinkism in it.  Drab surroundings, to be sure. 

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That strikes me as a bit of cheap shot.  Kes strikes me as the only movie that actually tries to get how working class people actually talk.  And it's about a decade after the British "New Wave" started, and it's considerably tougher.  It's also far more admired nowadays than the BNW, much of which looks rather stodgy.

 

I can understand where Face is coming from though.  The comedy THE FULL MONTY for me and my wife WAS a bit hard to digest most of it's dialog at first viewing, but we noticed that with subsequent viewings, we were able to decipher more and more of it, and got rewarded with "getting" more of the humorous exchanges.

 

I also think it's more than a bit pretentious and snobbish to assume "working class" people talk so differently or use poorer grammar than do anyone else.  I can only suppose it's an oft used and accepted device in many British movies, at least from what I'VE seen, but still a bit stodgy and presumptuous.  They've done that, and still do a bit, in American cinema too.  Assuming ALL hourly-wage manufacturing workers spend their free time swilling beer, bowling or playing cards and beating their wives.

 

Sound familiar?

 

 

Sepiatone

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I am not familiar with "The Angry Silence or "Woman in a Dressing Gown" but I actually have "Life at the Top", the little-seen sequel to "Room at the Top".

 

I alway wonder if the British New Wave films took their inspiration from Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty" "The Bachelor Party", "Middle of the Night" or "The Catered Affair".

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This is making me think of kitchen appliance references:

 

Crimes of the Heart:  Jessica Lange:  Why'd you do it Babe?  Why'd you put your head in the oven?

                                   Sissy Spacek:   I don't know.....I'm having a bad day.

 

Pretty in Pink:             Molly Ringwald:  I'm going out with Blane.

                                   Jon Cryer:          His name is Blane? That's a major appliance, that's not a name

 

 

The Catered Affair:  Bette Davis wants a new refrigerator to replace the icebox.

                                 Ernest Borgnine:  No new contrivances in this apartment!

 

                                 

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This is making me think of kitchen appliance references:

 

Crimes of the Heart:  Jessica Lange:  Why'd you do it Babe?  Why'd you put your head in the oven?

                                   Sissy Spacek:   I don't know.....I'm having a bad day.

 

 

What is that movie where someone tries to commit suicide by putting their head in an electric oven?

Maybe there's more than one. 

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Although it's rightly counted in the "Brit noir" category, IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY (how's that for a downbeat title?) actually has a scene with Googie Withers at the kitchen sink.

 

WOMAN IN A DRESSING GOWN (which I haven't seen) is sometimes named as a key film in this genre.

 

Some other titles which come to mind:

 

A TASTE OF HONEY

THE ANGRY SILENCE

THE L-SHAPED ROOM

THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER

BILLY LIAR

THE GIRL WITH GREEN EYES

ROOM AT THE TOP

All great choices, King!

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The only trouble with these wonderful films is understanding what they are saying. I like the DVDs to have English subtitles for the English dialogue.

But you know, Face that many Brits might need subtitles for Lonesome and his buds in "AFITC" since those southern accents can get a bit thick too!

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I've never seen Kes (1969-UK), but I have seen another Ken Loach film.  From 1971.  I believe the original title was "Wednesday's Child", but I bought a used Columbia VHS release of it over 20 years ago from a low-rent video shop under the title "Family Life".  Stars Sandy Ratcliff, Grace Cave, Bill Dean and Malcolm Tierney.  Don't expect happy stuff here, but I found it to be well worth watching.  I've watched the tape 3 times.  It could be on DVD now, I reckon.  It's filmed in a docu-drama style, btw.   

 

     A KIND OF LOVING (1962) is another British kitchen-sink drama. 

 

     Has anyone mentioned 1959's LOOK BACK IN ANGER?  Even the 1960 Richard Todd/Peter Sellers movie NEVER LET GO has some kitchen-sinkism in it.  Drab surroundings, to be sure. 

"Look Back in Anger" and "A Kind of Loving" are both fab examples of kitchen sink stuff!

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The definition....angry young men who were disillusioned with modern society?   Didn't they use to be called hippes?

I don't think of the British "angry young men" moniker as being much like hippies.

 

But that's just me, Ham.

 

They seem much more insulted by class consciousness in Britain, whereas many hippies were too drugged up to even notice such things.

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I love THE WHISPERERS starring Edith Evans. It's directed by Bryan Forbes. I'm not sure if it's technically part of the kitchen sink wave of films. But it very much has that feel to me.

 

P.S. I just looked kitchen sink realism up on wiki, and THE WHISPERERS is included:

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-06-24%2Bat%2B3.12.4

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I can understand where Face is coming from though.  The comedy THE FULL MONTY for me and my wife WAS a bit hard to digest most of it's dialog at first viewing, but we noticed that with subsequent viewings, we were able to decipher more and more of it, and got rewarded with "getting" more of the humorous exchanges.

 

I also think it's more than a bit pretentious and snobbish to assume "working class" people talk so differently or use poorer grammar than do anyone else.  I can only suppose it's an oft used and accepted device in many British movies, at least from what I'VE seen, but still a bit stodgy and presumptuous.  They've done that, and still do a bit, in American cinema too.  Assuming ALL hourly-wage manufacturing workers spend their free time swilling beer, bowling or playing cards and beating their wives.

 

Sound familiar?

 

 

Sepiatone

Now if all women in British movies sounded like Joan Greenwood, we commoners would have no trouble understanding the language, Sepia.

 

As Churchill once said, "Two countries separated by one language."

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This is making me think of kitchen appliance references:

 

Crimes of the Heart:  Jessica Lange:  Why'd you do it Babe?  Why'd you put your head in the oven?

                                   Sissy Spacek:   I don't know.....I'm having a bad day.

 

Pretty in Pink:             Molly Ringwald:  I'm going out with Blane.

                                   Jon Cryer:          His name is Blane? That's a major appliance, that's not a name

 

 

The Catered Affair:  Bette Davis wants a new refrigerator to replace the icebox.

                                 Ernest Borgnine:  No new contrivances in this apartment!

That was quite amusing, Roy and in return may I suggest to you the following movie, called: 

 

Kitchen Stories (2003)
Salmer fra kjøkkenet (original title)
PG |  1h 35min | ComedyDrama | 17 January 2003 (Norway)
MV5BMTIzNjEwNTc5MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNzE3
MV5BMTcyOTY4MzM3N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjg4
 
 
1:54 | Trailer
 

 
Watch Now

From $2.99 on Amazon Video

 
ON DISC
A scientific observer's job of observing an old cantankerous single man's kitchen habits is complicated by his growing friendship with him.
Director: Bent Hamer
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What is that movie where someone tries to commit suicide by putting their head in an electric oven?

Maybe there's more than one. 

I think Maureen Stapleton does that in "Bye Bye Birdie", Holden.

 

Oops, probably was a gas oven.

 

Thanks for bringing in such an outre reference!

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I think Maureen Stapleton does that in "Bye Bye Birdie", Holden.

 

Oops, probably was a gas oven.

 

Thanks for bringing in such an outre reference!

 

I think it was an electric oven in BYE BYE BIRDIE.

 

For some reason I'm hearing Paul Lynde saying "It's electric."

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I think Maureen Stapleton does that in "Bye Bye Birdie", Holden.

 

Oops, probably was a gas oven.

 

Thanks for bringing in such an outre reference!

 

I believe the Bogie film Knock On Any Door has a women (wife of bad boy John Derek's character) kill herself using a gas oven.

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Hey, jamesjazzguitar, you mentioned "Knock On Any Door".  Did you know that Frank Sinatra wanted the juvenile delinquent role, but when the producer saw Frank's hairline, he cast John Derek instead.

 

Sinatra would had been a little too old for the part and he really wouldn't have fit the movie's tag line of 'live fast and leave a good looking corpse'.

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