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Movie References Within a Movie


CaveGirl
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I like movies where within the film, there is a reference to another film, that makes you feel great that you got the reference since otherwise your movie knowledge might be questioned as being meaningless and a sick avocation, even to yourself.

 

For example, in "Annie Hall" there is a reference to the killers from "In Cold Blood". I saw a retrospective of the Allen film a few years ago, and when Woody said something about not wanting to live in the woods or whatever, because Dick and Perry might be there, I started laughing uproariously and then noticed no one else in the audience was laughing.

 

Apparently they were not into Dick Hickok and Perry Smith info, or just thought I was strange [don't answer] but my guess is, they just didn't get the reference so had a zilch reaction.

 

So, if you have any examples of similar things please post here and share!

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AllI can come up with quickly is ....

 

In the movie THAT THING YOU DO actor Tom Everett Scott's character Guy Patterson often repeats the line "I am Spartacus!".  Which I think most who've seen the movie caught on to.  But also just probably thought that he was claiming that HE was Spartacus  But if it makes you feel any better, I too, snickered a bit at the Dick and Perry referrence in ANNIE HALL.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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AllI can come up with quickly is ....

 

In the movie THAT THING YOU DO actor Tom Everett Scott's character Guy Patterson often repeats the line "I am Spartacus!".  Which I think most who've seen the movie caught on to.  But also just probably thought that he was claiming that HE was Spartacus  But if it makes you feel any better, I too, snickered a bit at the Dick and Perry referrence in ANNIE HALL.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

I do feel better, Sepia knowing someone else with such abstruse film knowledge and only wish you'd been in the audience with me as a compatriot.

 

Yes, the line "I am Spartacus" is funny when referenced in other things. Thanks for contributing!

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In ANNIE HALL, Annie and Alvy while waiting in line to see THE SORROW AND THE PITY, overhear the opinions of the guy standing directly behind them of Federico Fellini's work such as LA STRADA... 

 

Annie-Hall-Movie-Line.png

 

(...so's I'd count that as a two-fer here, CG)

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In ANNIE HALL, Annie and Alvy while waiting in line to see THE SORROW AND THE PITY, overhear the opinions of the guy standing directly behind them of Federico Fellini's work such as LA STRADA... 

 

Annie-Hall-Movie-Line.png

 

(...so's I'd count that as a two-fer here, CG)

His movies do always have such high-toned references, Dargo and thanks for reminding me.

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In Allen's Oscar-winning 1986 film "Hannah and Her Sisters," his hypochondriac character explains how the 1933 Marx Brothers comedy "Duck Soup" saved his life.

 

 

Good one, Jakeem!

 

I'm starting to wonder if there are any films by Allen that don't have other movie refs?

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Good one, Jakeem!

 

I'm starting to wonder if there are any films by Allen that don't have other movie refs?

 

That's doubtful. One of his early films -- "Play It Again, Sam" (1972) -- was about a movie buff obsessed with the movie "Casablanca" and Humphrey Bogart. 

 

Of course, Allen's influences range from Bergman to Fellini to Bob Hope. And we've seen that in his films.

 

 

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Something I noticed from watching "What's Up Doc" (1972) with Babs Streisand and Ryan O'Neal:

 

Barbra rips Ryan's jacket while she's trying to stop him, and I remembered how Katharine Hepburn did the same thing to Cary Grant in "Bringing up Baby" (1938). 

 

 

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Something I noticed from watching "What's Up Doc" (1972) with Babs Streisand and Ryan O'Neal:

 

Barbra rips Ryan's jacket while she's trying to stop him, and I remembered how Katharine Hepburn did the same thing to Cary Grant in "Bringing up Baby" (1938). 

 

That's probably because Peter Bogdanovich, who directed "What's Up Doc," greatly admired "Bringing Up Baby" director Howard Hawks.

 

As a matter of fact, the final film shown at the Royal Theater in Anarene, Texas -- the 1950s small town in Bogdanovich's Oscar-nominated 1971 drama "The Last Picture Show" -- was Hawks' great 1948 Western "Red River." 

 

 

 

sjff_02_img0585.jpg

Bogdanovich

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Something I noticed from watching "What's Up Doc" (1972) with Babs Streisand and Ryan O'Neal:

 

Barbra rips Ryan's jacket while she's trying to stop him, and I remembered how Katharine Hepburn did the same thing to Cary Grant in "Bringing up Baby" (1938). 

Yesssssssssssssssss!

 

I'd forgotten that, so thanks for the reminder, N&N. That film really does have other elements reminiscent of BUB.

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That's probably because Peter Bogdanovich, who directed "What's Up Doc," greatly admired "Bringing Up Baby" director Howard Hawks.

 

As a matter of fact, the final film shown at the Royal Theater in Anarene, Texas -- the 1950s small town in Bogdanovich's Oscar-nominated 1971 drama "The Last Picture Show" -- was Hawks' great 1948 Western "Red River." 

 

 

 

sjff_02_img0585.jpg

Bogdanovich

Right on, Jakeem and thanks!

 

My "strange movies" thread brought up "Dementia" [aka Daughter of Horror] which as we all know was similarly shown in "The Blob".

 

I wonder if filmmakers doing such things are perhaps wanting to show an abbreviated clip of something that they think has some kind of subtext for their newer film?

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Right on, Jakeem and thanks!

 

My "strange movies" thread brought up "Dementia" [aka Daughter of Horror] which as we all know was similarly shown in "The Blob".

 

I wonder if filmmakers doing such things are perhaps wanting to show an abbreviated clip of something that they think has some kind of subtext for their newer film?

 

Perhaps. But filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg and George Lucas simply love making references to films and genres they've always loved. Some of Spielberg's influences are Disney films and John Ford movies. Lucas grew up as an enthusiast for movie serials, World War II films, Westerns and Kurosawa tales. And they've always put those influences onscreen.

 

 

 

 

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I'm usually bored by references by film school generation directors to their favorite movies. One exception, however, is the hilarious Bunuel scene in Midnight in Paris.

 

For other movie references: don't forget Martha's struggle in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? to remember the title of that Bette Davis movie. "What a dump."

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Not sure if this was deliberate or not. But in the 2006 dystopian tale "V for Vendetta," the British dictator played by Sir John Hurt is often depicted like screen incarnations of Big Brother from George Orwell's "1984."

 

V+For+Vendetta+(2005)+Official+Trailer+%

 

Interestingly, Hurt was in the 1984 film version of Orwell's novel, but he starred as the beleaguered hero, Winston Smith. Big Brother (the image of Bob Flag) looked like this:

 

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Not sure if this was deliberate or not. But in the 2006 dystopian tale "V for Vendetta," the British dictator played by Sir John Hurt is often depicted like screen incarnations of Big Brother from George Orwell's "1984."

 

 

Yeah, it was definitely deliberate. 

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In Day For Night, Jacqueline Bisset's character makes a comment about not wanting to be remembered as "that woman from the movie with the car chase", or something like that. Obviously a reference to Bullitt.

 

Speaking of Bisset, I watched Under the Volcano last night and the cinema at the beginning of the movie is showing Mad Love, and even has posters for Las Manos de Orlac, that apparently being the Mexican title of the movie.

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I'm usually bored by references by film school generation directors to their favorite movies. 

I'm kind of with you on this. I'm a film school graduate and I get bored with it too. When I was making student films in college, I tried to stay away from doing that. It was kind of like an exercise in showing off-- and that you were admitting your own ideas were so weak you had to glom on to something someone else had done (and much more successfully).

 

This said, I do think it works if the reference is plot-related or triggers some sort of revelation about character. In Merchant Ivory's MR. AND MRS. BRIDGE, the Bridges (played by Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward) go to see A STAR IS BORN. Immediately it's clear that the happy, adventurous married life depicted on screen when Janet Gaynor and Fredric March are on their honeymoon is not at all the kind of marriage the Bridges have. So in this case, the reference or allusion gives us a contrast and tells us something about the characters in the story we are in the middle of watching.

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Also in "V for Vendetta," the mysterious freedom fighter in the Guy Fawkes mask (Hugo Weaving) draws inspiration from his favorite movie. It's the 1934 version of "The Count of Monte Cristo," starring Robert Donat.

 

 

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That's doubtful. One of his early films -- "Play It Again, Sam" (1972) -- was about a movie buff obsessed with the movie "Casablanca" and Humphrey Bogart. 

 

Of course, Allen's influences range from Bergman to Fellini to Bob Hope. And we've seen that in his films.

 

 

As we on this site all know, the words "Play it again, Sam" were never spoken in CASABLANCA. (Woody said he knew that, but he didn't care.)

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In THE GRIFTERS, Anjelica Huston gets a phone call warning her that her boss knows she's been stealing from him. She immediately leaves, leaving the TV on -- it's playing THE LADY VANISHES.

 

In BRUTE FORCE, the convicts who have behaved themselves are rewarded with a showing of THE EGG AND I.

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Was just last night watching (again) THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION in which there's a scene showing the cons watching the movie GILDA., and shows RITA HAYWORTH's "hair tossing" scene.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Well, the Stephen King story that the movie was based on is titled "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption." In King's version, the first poster that Andy Dufresne -- the character played in the film by Tim Robbins -- puts up in his cell is an image of Hayworth.

 

Writer-director Frank Darabont reportedly dropped Hayworth's name from the film's title because he was being inundated with resumés from actresses who wanted to play her in the movie.

 

tumblr_n1h54iKOCo1r6amklo1_500.gif

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