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Cathy or Kenton

You know you're hooked

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You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

 

you cite scenes from movies during your Sunday school lesson.

 

 

You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

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You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

 

you cite scenes from movies during your Sunday school lesson.

 

 

You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

 

...they show movies not available on video.

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...you expect every cop and/or priest you run across in real life to look just like Pat O'Brien? OR at least be Irish???

 

(...well, that's when I knew I WAS hooked on TCM, anyway)

 

;)

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...You check out your cable service's "guide" to see what THEY have scheduled for the day/night before checking out any other channel.

 

This thread, in the way it's presented, reminds me of the late BOB TALBERT's Detroit Free Press column.  He used to pose questions in his column in this fashion, inviting regular readers to submit their thoughts, and would even print his favorites in his column.

 

I have somewhere, saved clippings of his column that my submissions were printed in.

 

Really miss that guy...

 

Sepiatone

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Your recognize the same doors used in different movies.

 

...and stairways. The one used in Mr Skeffington is the same one used in Now Voyager, and others I'm sure, maybe even Jezebel. Same house, I should say.

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You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

 

you cite scenes from movies during your Sunday school lesson.

 

 

You know you're hooked on TCM when ....

I have always been "hooked" on TCM but didn't realize it until I developed a presentation for my Travelers Club on "Seeing the World" in the movies when I discussed what I thought were the best movies filmed in locations through-out the world. 

 

This really began to interest me when I became a TCM fan and was watching BHOWANI JUNCTION and realized it was filmed in Pakistan.  Following that realization I went back and looked at many films from that perspective including SHADOW OF A DOUBT which Hitchcock actually filmed in Santa Rosa California.   So I am hooked....big time.

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...when there are absolutely NO commercial interruptions.

 

Well related to this;  you know you're hooked when you put on Depends right before the movie starts.

 

On another thread related to concerns about TCM showing commercials I stated that I wished TCM had ONE break (intermission),  per movie.     Of course maybe I should just drink less wine while the movie is on.   :wacko:  

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Well related to this;  you know you're hooked when you put on Depends right before the movie starts.

 

On another thread related to concerns about TCM showing commercials I stated that I wished TCM had ONE break (intermission),  per movie.     Of course maybe I should just drink less wine while the movie is on.   :wacko:  

 

Ah, SEE?!

 

They don't warn ya 'bout this sort'a thing when ya join that wine club, huh!

 

(...the ****!!!)

 

;)

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for Language

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you cite scenes from movies during your Sunday school lesson.

Well, if the movie is ... And God Created Woman

:D

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You start watching The Music Man just to pass the half-hour until Jeopardy, and you end up missing Jeopardy.

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...You actually ponder the idea of paying Comcast for their $99-$150/mo. digital-cable tier just to get it.  And NO OTHER REASON.

 

(C'mon, TCM, can't you take a tip from HBO, and give us a streaming-only simulcast?  Where the movies last longer than a week?)    :(

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You tell your husband when he's setting up new television services:

 

"I don't care how many video games you buy, just make sure I'm signed up for a high enough tier satellite package so that I have TCM!"

 

---

 

When your 2 TB DVR is 85% full (of the 85%, probably 70% of that are TCM recordings) and you actually get a second 2 TB DVR (actually it's to accomodate my sister who has moved in for awhile) and you record things onto that DVR as well. 

 

---

 

You find yourself recording an entire days' worth of programming during the Summer of Darkness series last year (this may have happened more than once, hence why my DVR is 85% full). 

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When you walk into the cable store and the first thing you say is:

 

"I have to have cable to see TCM."........

 

They show you the cable packages and all the hundreds of channels that you're going to be able to see, but all you say is:

 

"Just show me where TCM is on the channel line-up."

 

And the salesperson says - - "I wish we had more customers like you."

 

He breaks into a smile, but you maintain your serious demeanor. Classic films are no laughing matter.

 

And that's exactly how it happened.

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When you walk into the cable store and the first thing you say is:

 

"I have to have cable to see TCM."........

 

Y'know, as much as I like TCM (which I haven't been able to watch since moving out to an area that puts it on the Premium tier, and the expensive tier you need to get the Premium tier), in my little streetcorner-prophet blog movement to ask "Where did the movies on TV go?", TCM is technically part of the problem, not the solution.

 

Whether it's all Milos Forman's fault that AFI 100 movies on TV now have to be treated with such kid gloves that they can't be shown with cuts or commercials, or whether it's just greedy neurotic Warner, afraid of their own shadow, that thinks that any viewer who isn't a TCM fan doesn't know any "old movie" besides Oz, GWTW or Robin Hood, we shouldn't have to gentrify the ability to watch actual 20th-century mainstream studio movies to only the upper-cable niche, and be discussing them only among our clever selves.  Even if we're a kind of "last outpost", No Cable Channel Is An Island.

That's where we were back in the 70's, when the only people paying attention to old films were Woody Allen-esque college students going to afternoon-matinee revival houses, insomniac late show fans, or little old ladies who still remembered Errol Flynn. 

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Eric--

 

Your discussion isn't really about movies it's about capitalism.

Many things we never paid for in the 19 fifties or sixties now we have to pay for them. And number of them--though I hate to say this-- are more important than old movies-- that is decent food and clean water.

 

Organic food is nothing more than the decent food that we had in 1958.

You wouldn't need bottled water all those water filters if we had the tap water that we had in 1958.

 

The local TV stations that showed the classic movies did that because that was the way the owners of those movies wanted to display them.

 

Thanks to the changing Market it's being done a different way now.

 

I'm sure you can think of a lot of things that used to be free but now we have to pay for.

 

It's no wonder so many of us are poor and so few of us are rich today.

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Here,in Oklahoma, we have the OETA Movie Club every Friday and Saturday.They show lots of good shows on TV.

 

Should we drop my original topic?

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Here,in Oklahoma, we have the OETA Movie Club every Friday and Saturday.They show lots of good shows on TV.

 

Should we drop my original topic?

After reading the post by Princess, I am now so depressed that I may have to go on a movie watching jag to cheer myself up!

 

Speaking of movies where the station was allowed to chop up the film in any way they wished. My mother told the story about a local car dealership where the son started up sponsoring a Friday night late movie, with only his dealership footing the bill. He would dress up like characters in films, and even though he was devoid of talent would stay on for seemingly hours during the commercial breaks, because he would cut down a two hour film to about ninety minutes so he could do his schtick. One film had Bogie walking up to a door, then they went to commercial break and this clown was doing his Humphrey imitation for about ten minutes, and then they went back to the film and this time Bogie was walking out of the door.

 

The clown had cut out a whole scene just so there'd be time for him to do his impressions and walk around in a trenchcoat.

 

That was the last time my mother watched the Late Nite Friday Theater!

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Princess would have anyone think that the '50's were idyllic.  Of course they weren't.

 

Unless you think unchallenged government intrusion into our private lives was OK, or seperate restrooms for African Americans, factories belching poison in our air or dumping poison in our water,  or keeping women "barefoot and pregnant" and underpaid for doing the same work as men was ALSO OK.

 

The only poison in our tap water though, was flouride.  Eventually chlorine was added, but yet at the time, the methods to treat waste water for public consumption worked well enough.  But as the population grew, and more and more people were dirtying up more and more water, it got more expensive to treat, and polititians wanting more and more MONEY in their pockets, well, they had to skimp somewhere, and unfortunately, it was in that area.

 

And that for every DIME some corporation had to spend in meeting government regulated clean air and water requirements, and worker safety regulations, they'd tack on what seemed like $100 or so to their products.

 

That "Late show" Cavegirl mentioned sure sounded like a nightmare! 

 

Well yeah, you could say that TV was "free" back then, but the CHOICES were few.  So then the "freedom" was somewhat dubious.  Sure, you didn't have to PAY to watch TV, but you were limited to what OTHER PEOPLE wanted you to see.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Princess would have anyone think that the '50's were idyllic.  Of course they weren't.

 

Unless you think unchallenged government intrusion into our private lives was OK, or seperate restrooms for African Americans, factories belching poison in our air or dumping poison in our water,  or keeping women "barefoot and pregnant" and underpaid for doing the same work as men was ALSO OK.

 

The only poison in our tap water though, was flouride.  Eventually chlorine was added, but yet at the time, the methods to treat waste water for public consumption worked well enough.  But as the population grew, and more and more people were dirtying up more and more water, it got more expensive to treat, and polititians wanting more and more MONEY in their pockets, well, they had to skimp somewhere, and unfortunately, it was in that area.

 

And that for every DIME some corporation had to spend in meeting government regulated clean air and water requirements, and worker safety regulations, they'd tack on what seemed like $100 or so to their products.

 

That "Late show" Cavegirl mentioned sure sounded like a nightmare! 

 

Well yeah, you could say that TV was "free" back then, but the CHOICES were few.  So then the "freedom" was somewhat dubious.  Sure, you didn't have to PAY to watch TV, but you were limited to what OTHER PEOPLE wanted you to see.

 

 

Sepiatone

Gosh, Sepia I saw none of this while watching reruns of "The Donna Reed Show".

 

Mostly it was just about Jeff and Mary's school problems and what Mary would tell Alex if she overspent on decorating.

 

Who knew!

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Actually, it was "Days of Wine and Roses"

Elmer Gantry would have been appropriate too, I suppose.

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Your discussion isn't really about movies it's about capitalism.

Many things we never paid for in the 19 fifties or sixties now we have to pay for them. And number of them--though I hate to say this-- are more important than old movies-- that is decent food and clean water.

 

Organic food is nothing more than the decent food that we had in 1958.

You wouldn't need bottled water all those water filters if we had the tap water that we had in 1958.

 

The local TV stations that showed the classic movies did that because that was the way the owners of those movies wanted to display them.

 

But you can still get your tap water for free, and put it in a Brita filter to make it more like it "should" be in the 10's.  Just because it's democratic doesn't make it as Evil and Deconstructable as the 50's.  

Just as you can watch a random movie on TV, and then track it down on disk--or at least, you used to be able to--if it tickled your fancy.  (And when we have threads about "What's showing this month?", Sepia, you're one to talk about "choice".  You like the random monthly pot-luck surprises and you know it.)

Around our area, we used to have a digital station showing ThisTV, which was a pretty limited commercial free-TV selection of MGM/Orion's third-party back-catalog, although at their high point, they even got Universal and Fox into the game (with the Monsters in October, the Marxes on New Year's, and Heidi at Christmas).  Because it had a corporate owner, like TCM, there was less worry about who had a hand out for a royalty cut, they didn't have to show old cheap third-generation public-domain favorites, and they could pretty well explore their library just for the sake of taking it out and giving it an occasional airing.

 

And--since it's next week's column, I hate to waste all this good discussion--stations showed them because they had nothing else to show.  After Johnny Carson, there was no Dave Letterman or Conan O'Brien, so they had to fill two of four hours till dawn, give the used-car clowns some airtime or sign off early, it's "not like anyone was watching then anyway".  (At least until the VCR/DVR was invented.)

That was back in the 70's Mary Tyler Moore Show days, when stations were responsible for their own programming, and had to groom local hosts for Chuckles the Clown and the Happy Homemaker.  But now that the rise of afternoon Dr. Oz syndication in the 80's, and all-night news in the 00's, took away a station's need to make any programming themselves, there's no need for a station to form any identity apart from their news divisions--Just turn on the network-news feed switch at night, on your way out the door, and there's enough programming till the 5am local update.

 

And that's leaving aside Fox and CW swallowing up the local independent UHF superstations that used to have to fill airtime between home-team baseball games, only to let the rise of the Infomercial pay for all their throwaway programming (why let the used-car clown interrupt someone else's movie, when he'll pay you to let you give him the whole half hour at 2am?) and....(sigh).

Sorry, C or K, you're right--It's your topic.  It's making me use up all my good stuff, and depressing me, too.  

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