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Improve the Magnificent Seven?


slaytonf
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Notwithstanding the all-starryness of The Magnificent Seven, there are some roles that to my mind could have been cast better.  Nobody doubts the magnificence of Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, James Coburn, and Charles Bronson.  And Robert Vaughn, though perhaps nearing borderline non-magnificence, still has the starch and gloves to pass muster.  But I have to say, I would like to have seen someone like James Garner in Harry Luck's role (of course, that's pipe dreams, but dreaming is free).  And for puppy-dog Chico, maybe Sal Mineo.

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Improve it? No such thing.

 

Yes, it can be a more realistic move -read dirtier. Or it can have a lot more action, more blood, more stunts, more imaginative killings.

 

But it can't duplicate the reverence that the original inspired. The world has changed too much. The flawless characterizations put forward by McQueen, Wallach, Vaughn, Bronson, will not be matched with today's propensity for less character development in favor of ooh and ahh action.

 

Then again, maybe once my generation has passed away, the original will be less revered than something newer.

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I sometimes, to pass the time, think of ways to remake or even "update"  some movies, or simply leave the basic premise alone.  Like once, I was thinking of how I would cast a "remake" of ON THE WATERFRONT, but not change the period of time the original took place.

 

I tried the same with other movies, like THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE.  I mean, WHO TODAY could do that original cast any justice? 

 

I thought, while watching  TM7 last night, and after hearing Carradine mention it's inspiration from SEVEN SAMURAI, that there have been movies that PREDATE Samuri that had a similar premise.  You know, a gang of bandits that terrorize ome small town.  And I immediately came up with THE WILD ONE.  And I thought, "Wouldn't it be a kick if someone found some long hidden fact that  Akira Kurosawa got the inspiration for HIS movie from IT?"

 

I mean, I don't mind many remakes, but think in the case of movies long held in "high regard", the remakes should be treated as they do with restaging Shakespeare plays.    I mean, I've known of sets and costumes being more or less "updated", but the text never changes.

 

 

Sepiatone

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For me, yes.  He's the worst thing in the movie.  Brad Dexter is just indifferent.  Bucholz is bad.

 

I would agree Bucholz gives the worst performance in the film.     As for actors of Mexican decent,   Ricardo Montalban would have been an improvement but he might have been too old for the role.     

 

But if one is going to complain about the casting of Bucholz because of his heritage (which you're not),  what about Eli Wallach.   

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I would agree Bucholz gives the worst performance in the film.     As for actors of Mexican decent,   Ricardo Montalban would have been an improvement but he might have been too old for the role.     

 

But if one is going to complain about the casting of Bucholz because of his heritage (which you're not),  what about Eli Wallach.   

 

 

I have no problem with people of one ethnicity playing another, after all, it's acting.  I think Mr. Wallach delivers his usual serviceable Mexican Bad Guy, though his Tuco had a little more depth to him, and even one fine moment on the road in The Good, Bad, 'n Ugly.

 

Now I think of it, Tony Franciosa could have done a good job as Chico, though he may have been a little old for it.

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I have no problem with people of one ethnicity playing another, after all, it's acting.  I think Mr. Wallach delivers his usual serviceable Mexican Bad Guy, though his Tuco had a little more depth to him, and even one fine moment on the road in The Good, Bad, 'n Ugly.

 

Eli Wallach, whom I knew pretty well, was a great actor and a lovely man. Pretty early in his career, he originated the role of Alvaro Mangiacavallo in The Rose Tattoo on Broadway in 1951, for which he won a Tony Award. He was close to Tennessee Williams and appeared in many productions of Williams plays. Eli was offered a part in the film From Here to Eternity but turned it down because he had promised Tennessee that he would play the lead in Camino Real, when funding came through for that very strange play. The part Eli turned down in From Here to Eternity went to Frank Sinatra.

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