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Blackboard Jungle


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I look forward to watching Blackboard Jungle on TCM tonight.  Haven't seen this film in a long time.   Anyone else planning to watch this?  Some of the "kids" look too old in this film - but other than that, not a bad film.

 

I quite like Blackboard Jungle. I enjoy the cast, the story, and especially that mid-50s inner city atmosphere.

 

But I can't stand to watch the scene in which the poor well-meaning teacher's jazz records get smashed !

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But I can't stand to watch the scene in which the poor well-meaning teacher's jazz records get smashed !

I'm reminded of the scene in It's Trad, Dad! in which the town fathers are destroying the records of the decadent music the teens like. All of a sudden, one of the older men says something to the effect of, "No, not that one!"

 

The camera pans down to reveal... a Lawrence Welk record.

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I think Vic Morrow was great in the film - perfect for that Artie West part.   When Glenn Ford said the records can't be replaced - but the recorder is $40 so put your coins in the can...and Morrow says "can we deduct it from our taxes"?   Man - he was one bad student.   Too bad Vic Morrow wasn't in that many movies.

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   I couldn't figure out how Dadier (Glenn Ford) decided to remain at that school when he was offered a teaching job at a better school

Normally, I'd say "well, that's why this is fiction."

But having known and trained many teachers, quite a few of them tell me they'd rather teach in the inner cities, because that's where the most help is needed. And a lot of them are still in those schools.

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Normally, I'd say "well, that's why this is fiction."

But having known and trained many teachers, quite a few of them tell me they'd rather teach in the inner cities, because that's where the most help is needed. And a lot of them are still in those schools.

 

I remember bringing up this movie and that point to a teacher of mine back when I was in high school and his response was basically the same thing.   He also added, "Teaching kids who WANT to learn is like training a dog to eat.  There's no  challenge  in it, and therefore no sense of accomplishment".

 

MR. Z was EVERY kid's favorite teacher in that school.

 

I always liked the movie, and eventually got( and still get) a kick out of seeing a young "Corporal Klinger" in the classroom.  but I also wonder----

 

RAFAEL CAMPOS as MORALES was also one of my favorite characters in the film.  The only other movie I recall seeing him in was LADY IN A CAGE.

 

Are there other films he's been in and it's just that I've never seen them?  Too bad, I thought he was kinda cool!  Plus, my wife thought he was "kind of CUTE!"

 

Whatever became of him?

 

Anyway, it's another one of those movies I can watch over again and never tire of.  And as for VIC MORROW----

 

I first saw BLACKBOARD JUNGLE on TV when the movie was 10 years old, which would make it 1965.  And by then already a Vic Morrow fan due to TV's COMBAT series, was delighted to see him in this.

 

 

Sepiatone

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RAFAEL CAMPOS as MORALES was also one of my favorite characters in the film.  The only other movie I recall seeing him in was LADY IN A CAGE.

 

Are there other films he's been in and it's just that I've never seen them?  Too bad, I thought he was kinda cool!  Plus, my wife thought he was "kind of CUTE!"

 

Here he is in Astro-Zombies with Tura Satana.

 

 

 

"Oh, this is a little something I picked up in The Blackboard Jungle."

untitled1-23.jpg

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Hey it takes a while to pass 6th grade.

 

jethro.jpg

Remember the episode where Jethro could hit a golf ball a mile, so they put him on the course like he's a pro, but everytime he has to putt like a foot, he also hits the golf ball a mile down the fairway?

 

Loved him as Jethrine too. Thanks for the visual, Ham even though you went off-topic!

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I remember bringing up this movie and that point to a teacher of mine back when I was in high school and his response was basically the same thing.   He also added, "Teaching kids who WANT to learn is like training a dog to eat.  There's no  challenge  in it, and therefore no sense of accomplishment".

 

MR. Z was EVERY kid's favorite teacher in that school.

 

I always liked the movie, and eventually got( and still get) a kick out of seeing a young "Corporal Klinger" in the classroom.  but I also wonder----

 

RAFAEL CAMPOS as MORALES was also one of my favorite characters in the film.  The only other movie I recall seeing him in was LADY IN A CAGE.

 

Are there other films he's been in and it's just that I've never seen them?  Too bad, I thought he was kinda cool!  Plus, my wife thought he was "kind of CUTE!"

 

Whatever became of him?

 

Anyway, it's another one of those movies I can watch over again and never tire of.  And as for VIC MORROW----

 

I first saw BLACKBOARD JUNGLE on TV when the movie was 10 years old, which would make it 1965.  And by then already a Vic Morrow fan due to TV's COMBAT series, was delighted to see him in this.

 

 

Sepiatone

Hey, Sepia we can start the Rafael Campos Fan Club since I too always would watch anything that he was in.

 

He seemed to be in more television shows than movies, after ****, but he was great in another Ted V. Mikels' masterpiece called "The Doll Squad" from 1973.

 

If you haven't seen it you don't know what you are missing:

 

The Doll Squad (1973)
PG |  1h 41min | ActionAdventure | 19 September 1973 (USA)
MV5BMTcxMjMzNTEyMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjI5
Squad of beautiful government agents tries to catch saboteurs.
Director: Ted V. Mikels
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Normally, I'd say "well, that's why this is fiction."

But having known and trained many teachers, quite a few of them tell me they'd rather teach in the inner cities, because that's where the most help is needed. And a lot of them are still in those schools.

 

To me it is very clear the Ford character stays at that inner city school because of the reason you state.   He had helped the Poitier character turn a corner and this gave him a sense of fulfillment.   One that he couldn't obtain to the same degree in a school in the burps.    (as well as the fact the screenwriter \ director wished to end the film with a hopeful message).

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Remember the episode where Jethro could hit a golf ball a mile, so they put him on the course like he's a pro, but everytime he has to putt like a foot, he also hits the golf ball a mile down the fairway?

 

Loved him as Jethrine too. Thanks for the visual, Ham even though you went off-topic!

 

I didn't went off topic, just replied to the "older kids" in school comment.

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The nerdy kid that sat in back of the class - the kid with the hair parted on the side who wore a suit an tie, he only had one line in the film:  he stands up during the cartoon and says "not the FBI" ....and that's his only line.   That kid didn't seem to fit in with all the bad students in the class.

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The nerdy kid that sat in back of the class - the kid with the hair parted on the side who wore a suit an tie, he only had one line in the film:  he stands up during the cartoon and says "not the FBI" ....and that's his only line.   That kid didn't seem to fit in with all the bad students in the class.

 

Oh yeah. Well, I THINK that kid was the one who had already planned his pre-law undergraduate course in school. ncff1.

 

(...uh-huh...he was the only one in that class smart enough to know all his fellow classmates would eventually need a good lawyer somewhere down the line...and I THINK his character's name in this movie was somethin' like "Murray Goldstein" or somethin', but don't quote me on this)

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Great post Dargo!   Hard to believe a kid named Murray Goldstein was in that class.   Who do you think threw the baseball at the teacher while he was writing on the blackboard?

 

Wasn't one of those students named "Lefty O'Shea" or somethin'?!

 

Well, THERE was probably your culprit right THERE!

 

(...you can never trust those southpaws, ya know)

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I thought maybe Poitier threw the ball cause when Glenn Ford said "whoever threw that will never pitch for the Yanks"....Poitier had a grin on his face.

 

Yeah, in all seriousness here(really tough for me, you understand), I always thought it was Poitier, too...and for the same reason.

 

(..and because as Ford noticed early on, Poitier was pretty much the leader of those kids, and so he might only have the guts to do such an outrageous thing and without needing the say-so from any of the other kids)

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Yeah, in all seriousness here(really tough for me, you understand), I always thought it was Poitier, too...and for the same reason.

 

(..and because as Ford noticed early on, Poitier was pretty much the leader of those kids, and so he might only have the guts to do such an outrageous thing and without needing the say-so from any of the other kids)

 

Why would a bunch of white kids have a black kid has their leader?    That just doesn't add up.

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Why would a bunch of white kids have a black kid has their leader?    That just doesn't add up.

 

Your question here James reminds me of the intro to this film the other night, and when Ben's co-host and movie selectee Lou Gossett Jr. (and who was evidently considered for the Poitier part at one time) mentioned that in the working-class mixed-race Brooklyn neighborhood he grew up in, the race of a kid meant very little and most all felt and were treated equally regardless of it.

 

(...remember that, or did you miss it?)

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