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R.I.P. Jack Palance


JonParker
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RIP Jack,

 

I loved you in Contempt and Baghdad Cafe and appreciated all your character roles.

 

You seemed like a heck of a guy and film won't be the same without you.

 

Your voice was one of the great ones, immediately recognizable and full of as much character as your face.

 

When you see Jim Coburn tell him we miss him as well.

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(From Yahoo.com)LOS ANGELES - Jack Palance, the craggy-faced menace in "Shane," "Sudden Fear" and other films who turned to comedy at 70 with his Oscar-winning self-parody in "City Slickers," died Friday.

 

Palance died of natural causes at his home in Montecito, Calif., surrounded by family, said spokesman Dick Guttman. Palance was 85 according to Associated Press records, but his family gave his age as 87.

 

When Palance accepted his Oscar for best supporting actor he delighted viewers of the 1992 Academy Awards by dropping to the stage and performing one-armed push-ups to demonstrate his physical prowess.

 

"That's nothing, really," he said slyly. "As far as two-handed push-ups, you can do that all night, and it doesn't make a difference whether she's there or not."

 

That year's Oscar host, Billy Crystal, turned the moment into a running joke, making increasingly outlandish remarks about Palance's accomplishments throughout the night's awards presentations.

 

It was a magic moment that epitomized the actor's 40 years in films. Always the iconoclast, Palance had scorned most of his film roles.

 

"Most of the stuff I do is garbage," he once told a reporter, adding that most of the directors he worked with were incompetent.

 

Movie audiences, however, were electrified by the actor's chiseled face and hulking presence, and a calm, low voice that made him all the more chilling.

 

As a kid he scared me as an adult I loved him. As I once heard, no one played Attila the Hun like Jack Palance. Rest in Peace Jack.

 

vallo

 

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vallo13

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Hi,

 

What sad and surprising news. He was one of the great beloved villains of the screen. He had the ability to scare you and send chills down your spine but yet, he had an endearing sense of humour too......

Malevalent but not really evil. Bad but not wicked. I loved his sneer.......

 

I loved him best as 'Simon the Magician' in "The Silver Chalice"

 

R.I.P. Jack

And, don't give St. Peter too hard a time...

 

Larry

 

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vecchiolarry

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Aw, heck, I can't imagine nor would I wish to have the spirit of Jack Palance confined to an 87 year old body that wouldn't do everything he always asked it to do with such menancing grace and surprising finesse, but I'll miss him still.

 

As has been said earlier here, he scared me as a kid and I relished his appearance in almost anything when I became an adult. I think I ceased to see him as simply a frightening person after my father explained to me that his face had been badly burned as a young man in the Air Force during WWII. Then I understood, as much as anyone can, what this guy may have gone through in a life that should've--by all rights--been lived wholly in obscurity, probably in the mines of Pennsylvania where he was nurtured--yet something in his Slavic soul led him first into boxing, then into acting and the creation of dramatic portraits of some of the most memorable people of post WWII classic cinema: a diseased hoodlum in Panic in the Streets, the ultimate bad man in Shane, a soldier at the end of his tether in Attack, and in his late Renaissance, in the delightful Bagdad Cafe, City Slickers and, the touching Prancer Returns, (yes, i know i'm a sap).

 

So, let's lift a glass in cyberspace to one of life's dreamers and doers, who once said the following, which isn't a bad epitaph for anyone:

 

"One of the most important reasons for living is to do something - live outside of yourself and put together an idea, an idea that you want to explore and then complete... Awaken your creative sensitivities!"

 

Oh, and wouldn't you love to hear that soft, deep voice say those words again?

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God, first you take Bruno Kirby..now Jack Palance I can't believe it! Jack Palance was great in the movie "Attack" opposite Eddie Albert. It was one of the greatest confrontations between characters in film history. I will always remember him in that role and the role I first saw him in "Shane'. What a talent and what push-ups he did when he won the Academy Award. Rest in Peace Jack, you were one of a kind, and we will never see the likes of you again! God Bless You. :(

 

Aftermath

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"Attack" That's one of my favorite films "aftermath",

 

Jack Palance as Costa: Listen to me, Cooney! If you put me and my men in a wringer - -if you send us out there and let us hang - -I swear, I swear by all that's holy, I'll come back. I'll come back and take this grenade and shove it down your throat and pull the pin.

 

The man was one of a kind......

 

vallo

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He used to scare me too, when I was little, but when I read what happened to his face in his youth, I learn not to be afraid of him as well, and I've learned to appreciate him as a brilliant and talented actor.

 

He will be greatly missed, and my condolences go out to his family.

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palance-sized.jpg

 

I remember writing his bio for the DVD VAMOS A MATAR, COMPA?EROS (U.S. title: COMPA?EROS), and being struck by what an interesting life, and an admirable one, he had struggling up from poverty in the Pennsylvania coal country to graduate from Stanford University and become a successful and sought-after character actor and star despite having what he, himself, called, an awful, ugly face (a lot of us would disagree of course, though his appearance certainly was memorable).

 

I also met him in a Thai restaurant in L.A.'s Larchmont Village. He was very pleasant and happy to be remembered by fans too young to have seen his work when he started out.

 

Another unique talent and individual gone.

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Hi Dolores,

 

Jack Palance was burned on his face, neck and upper chest while bailing out of a plane during WWII.

Fortunately, one of the nurses at the hospital treated him with aloe vera and his skin healed reasonably well. I never noticed any scars and thought he was fairly good looking. He has Cossack blood in his ancestry, thus the high cheek bones....

 

Larry

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Hi stoney,

I hope that you don't mind my answering, but, as touched on in my original post on this thread, Jack Palance had been burned during training in the Air Force during WWII and went through a long period of rehabilitation in a Veteran's Hospital. That event and some time in the boxing ring helped to contribute to that unforgettable face.

 

Btw, after my initial post I remembered that Mr. Palance had given a remarkable performance in the original tv version of Rod Serling's fine Requiem for a Heavyweight in 1956, which may still be available on video. He was also, it seems, a true Renaissance man, since, in addition to being a fine horseman in private life, he wrote and illustrated a prose poem called "Forest of Love" about sexuality and loneliness, which was published in 1996, when he would have been 77. So much for the fading of the creative impetus as one grows older.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Ooops, Larry, you're a font of info, as usual. We must've been posting simultaneously.

;)

 

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moirafinnie6

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Hi stoneyburke:

 

Sorry I didn't get back with you right away because I was off line.

 

The answer Larry gave you is correct. In addition to Larry's answer, I've also remember reading awhile back that Jack had some skin graphing done to his face as well. It's been so long ago when I read this, so unfortunately, I don't remember where I got this info from.

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Thanks moirafinnie6 and Ina. Surprising that I had never read that anywhere about Jack before now.

 

I thought he was perfect in Rod Serling's teleplay. Then again, I adored Rod Serling and his writing...talk about gone too young!...so there weren't many shows of his I didn't like.

 

Imagine coming back from something like that AND pursuing acting! It boggles my mind. I give him a LOT of credit and wish him flights of angels.

 

dolores

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He was terrific in "Shane" and "Attack." The scene in which he shoots Elisha Cook Jr. is unforgettable. Palance could do more just sitting and looking than most actors could by waving their arms around and yelling.

 

Although the movie itself ran out of gas, he was good as Dracula for CBS back in the Seventies. He had a small off-beat role in the late Sixties Amicus horror film "Torture Garden" that showed some of his comic talent.

 

Still, I was surprised to see how funny he could be in "Bagdad Cafe." He was priceless in that movie and terrific in "City Slickers." He was one of a kind.

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The first time I saw Jack on tv back in 1968 when I was 6-years old. The name of the mystery show was "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." I don't remember all the details of the show because it was so long ago, but I do remember seeing him running down this damp, dark, and dreary alley, which was lit by a streetlight in the background. I remember feeling scared watching that seen, and I didn't want to watch it any more.

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