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Good variety from Arthur Kennedy


bradtexasranger
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I remember reading when Barabbas first came out that the full eclipse of the sun, as shown during the early crucifixion scenes, was a real eclipse of the sun. A lot of people have forgotten that, since the scenes were shot in wide-angle and the sun couldn?t be clearly seen as actually being the sun. A lot of people think it was a special effect.

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You pretty much hit the nail on the head with the variety comment, Brad. Arthur Kennedy is one of my favorite, favorite actors, so I definitely watched last night's lineup. I've never been disappointed by a movie that he's in--and he's been in so many top notch movies, especially in his early stuff at Warners. I wish TCM would show some of those early 40's b-movies that kicked off his career as well.

 

I particularly enjoy him in those soapy 50's melodramas like 'Peyton Place' and 'Some Came Running' (I have yet to see 'A Summer Place'). But I've really been enjoying his Westerns lately. 'Bend of the River' is particuarly excellent, but my favorite Arthur Kennedy role is in 'Elmer Gantry', where he plays the cynical reporter Jim Lefferts. IMO, that's the one he should have gotten an Oscar for, but wasn't even nominated for. He's fantastic in that, kind of like the balance of the whole movie.

 

As you can see, I could go on all day, but I stop here before my gushing gets to be too fangirl-ish. :)

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I'm glad they showed Bright Victory. Every time they've played it, I've missed it. So, I was glad to see it. What a lovely movie. Kennedy richly deserved his Oscar nomination for the film. I didn't think the film once went too sentimental. It was just sentimental enough.

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I'm in total agreement about Arthur Kennedy. He first caught my eye in The Girl in White, and also in The Lusty Men (staring B. Mitchum and S. Hayward). Does anyone know why he made so many foreign movies in the late 60's and 70's? I looked him up on IMDB to see how old he was and was surprised at the amount.

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I enjoyed that lineup very much. I hadn't seen either BARRABAS or DAY OF THE EVIL GUN. I thought the former was exceptionally well done. And I think BRIGHT VICTORY is one of Kennedy's (and all the cast) best roles. What ever happened to the leading lady who played the blonde? I don't recall seeing her in anything else, though she had a very pleasant, warm personality.

 

Miss G

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There's a very good book on Arthur Kennedy that I bought a few months ago which covers his entire career, and there's a section covering all the Italian movies. He basically did them because he enjoyed working in Italy, and eventually, he began working exclusively overseas. He thought the locations were fascinating, the work was easy (the dialogue was all dubbed afterwards) and I assume the money wasn't bad either. Eventually, the scripts got worse and worse and he finally told his agent to call it a day. His interest in acting also waned with the death of his wife in 1975.

 

The only American work he did at the time was a 1974 tv show called "Nakia" (he disliked working in tv) and the 1976 all-star horror movie, "The Sentinel". Everything else was Italian.

 

I always thought Joseph Cotten's career went haywire in the 70's, but Arthur Kennedy's just imploded. A real shame because he was in so many fantastic movies. And if Arthur Kennedy were still alive, I'd love to ask him what possessed him to accept a role in "Emmanuelle?on Taboo Island"!

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Chelsea and MissGoddess, thanks for the heads up on "A Summer Place"! I've been dying to see this one and I was beyond thrilled to find out that it's finally coming out on dvd! I've seen a few movie/production stills of him where he looks all boozed up, holding a glass, tilted to the side.

 

I'm still waiting to pre-order from Amazon, because February is a long time away. I figured some more classic dvd's will be out by then and I can add them to the order for the free shipping.

 

And I totally agree that Kennedy was great in "The Glass Menagerie." He's the main reason why I love that version so much compared to the others. I think it was a Fox movie though, because I taped it off FMC a few months ago right before they stopped showing it. Whew!

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If you like Arthur Kennedy, you might like to check out tomorrow morning's showing of Devotion (1946) with Ida Lupino, Olivia De Havilland and Arthur Kennedy as the Bronte siblings. It's one of Warner's attempts to be classy and it doesn't entirely work, but Kennedy is--of course--interesting as the wastrel brother Bramwell, as is Lupino as Emily. One of the more intriguing might-have-been productions from the forties' dream factory. It airs at 8:30am on Tues., Nov. 14th on TCM.

 

Sugarpuss,

Could you please share the title of that intriguing sounding book on Arthur Kennedy? Thanks in advance for any info. Wait until you see A Summer Place. Kennedy is great, as is Constance Ford and Dorothy Maguire. Even Richard Egan is good here, thanks in large part to the good actors he appears opposite here. Now, about those youngsters...well, the less said the better.

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moria, the name of the book is "Arthur Kennedy, Man of Characters: A Stage and Cinema Biography" by Meredith C. Macksoud. I bought my copy through Amazon for about $30, but I'm sure other places on the net have it. It's a great book, very detailed, lots of good pictures (I've always found him very handsome, so the pics were icing on the cake) and goes over every single one of his movie and stage performances. There's even a good intro and closing chapter written by his daughter that gives a little more personal insight into him. If you're a fan, it's definitely worth seeking out.

 

And I'm very excited to see "Devotion" tomorrow morning. I've been looking forward to this one since I noticed it on the schedule a month or two ago. A few interesting facts: this movie was actually made in 1943, but shelved until the end of the war until 1946. Also, according to his biography, Kennedy wrote an article for the Saturday Evening Post in 1953 and said the role of Branwell was his favorite at the time.

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> I think

> it was a Fox movie though, because I taped it off FMC

> a few months ago right before they stopped showing

> it.

 

No, it was produced by Charles K. Feldman Productions for Warner Bros. Feldman retained rights to MENAGERIE and STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE and sold them both to Fox, who reissued them in the late 50's. Warners bought STREETCAR back a few years ago but Fox still owns GLASS MENAGERIE. Too bad, too, because the opening chords of Steiner's music are cut along with the Warners logo. I produced the original soundtrack CD for BYU/Screen Archives a few years ago - 70 minutes of magnificent Max Steiner music:

 

http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm?ID=2003

 

Ray Faiola,

Chelsea Rialto Studios

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All Right Miss Goddess and Moira: :)

 

About those youngsters. . . this was the first serious starring role for both Sandra and Troy, if they were a little stiff it could be understood, especially in the company of Dorothy McGuire, Richard Egan, Arthur Kennedy and all the rest. Also, it was in the late 50's and they were doing things that 'good' boys and girls didn't do. I always thought they were cute as buttons trying to be adult. I shouldn't say always, when I first saw it, I was shocked to my bobbysox, but as an adult I felt so sorry for them (the characters, not the actors) and cheered for the 'adulterous' parents who helped them.

 

Message was edited by:

mrsl

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