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Panning For Gold (your obscure favorites)


bobhopefan1940
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As I mentioned on the other thread, "Penthouse" with Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy and the great Nat Pendleton is a fun movie. "Counsellor-At-Law" with John Barrymore is my favorite role of his. "The Idol Dancer," one of Griffith's lesser known silents, is a good little movie.

 

In newerish films, "Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl" is a Chinese movie that's both very sad and incredibly moving. I'm also into Chinese historical epics -- "The Emperor and the Assassin," "Musa The Warrior" and "Hero" are all good, although the last one isn't that unknown.

 

There are tons of really good cult films that aren't well known, but I won't try to list them all.

 

Great thread.

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I really like Pilot #5, even though it's not that well-known of a film. Good cast (Franchot Tone, Gene Kelly, Van Johnson) and an interesting story, IMO. But it's certainly not the first film you think about when you think about any of these actors.

 

I also like Double Wedding, a William Powell/Myrna Loy film that is not nearly as popular as The Thin Man films...but is still VERY good. It's interesting, but when I look for it under William Powell's filmology here at TCM, it's not even in his list! But it's a great film.

 

At least it's in Myrna Loy's list! *lol*

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Hi Bobhopefan,

 

I have lots of these---here are a few:

The Barbarian - an early pre-code with Myrna Loy, kind of in The Sheik vein...

The Picasso Summer - with Albert Finney and Yvette Mimieux. Along the lines of Two for the Road. A married couple whose relationship is on the rocks take a road trip through the south of France (and Spain, I think) searching for the famous painter. Once upon a time I recorded this extremely rare film off of A&E---when they used to show classic movies---and I remember it as a bittersweet film with beautiful locations (of course) and I think it featured a nice score, too, by someone like Michel Legrand. Anyway, I left the vhs tape behind me years ago in my wanderings and have NEVER found it since. If anyone has any clue how I can get my hands on a copy, I'd love them for it. I've tried ebay.

SLATTERY'S HURRICANE - The Fox Movie Channel occasionally airs this movie featuring a great cast: Richard Widmark, Linda Darnell and Veronica Lake. One of Veronica's last roles, and she's very touching in it.

THE HURRICANE - Many of John Ford's early pictures fall into this category for me, including this exciting story that is really all about the characters involved---until you are wowed by the exceptionally well conceived special effects. Some of my favorite Ford pictures are his "studio" pictures, which critics have never given as much due---except, contradictorily, to his big Zanuck pix.

A LADY TAKES A CHANCE - John Wayne and Jean Arthur in a truly funny little gem of a comedy, a la THE COWBOY AND THE LADY (another fave)

DARK WATERS - Merle Oberon in a strange, brooding story---is there any other kind, set in the South?

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pktrekgirl:

I caught "Double Wedding" a year or two ago and it is a very funny film. At the end where they have the wedding in the trailer is pretty funny.

 

Miss Goddess:

"A Lady Takes A Chance" has turned up on other channels and is on DVD so I've been able to enjoy it recently after a LONG, LONG, LONG time.

 

Other favorites I've mentioned are "Easy Living" with Jean Arthur. "Theodora Goes Wild" with Irene Dunne (which is on in January, I believe.) There are also some old English comedies like "Tight Little Island", The Titifield Thunderbolt" and Alec Guiness' "Last Holiday.

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Love all the films being mentioned here and will be sure and give them a chance. I recorded Pilot #5 but never ended up watching it because it didn't seem like your average Gene Kelly flick, but I will certainly watch it now with a more open mind.

 

Miss G.

 

You mentioned The Cowboy and the Lady. I know there are several different versions to this film but am I wrong in suspecting the one you speak of would be the charming little Coop film? I loved this movie and it was one of the first I ever saw with Gary Cooper in it... Set the stage for me to enjoy all the rest of his films!

 

bhf1940

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> You mentioned The Cowboy and the Lady. I know

> there are several different versions to this film but

> am I wrong in suspecting the one you speak of would

> be the charming little Coop film? I loved this movie

> and it was one of the first I ever saw with Gary

> Cooper in it... Set the stage for me to enjoy all the

> rest of his films!

>

> bhf1940

 

Oh my yes, definitely the one with that tall drink of water!!

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There was one made with Cary Grant and Jeanne Crain called 'People Will Talk'. It was a comedy/drama and I don't think it got much attention. It's one of my favorite all time movies and although it's been on TCM, nobody ever talks about it much. I tried a thread on it last time it played and got only about 3 responses so I still don't think people know about it. It's a terrific little movie though.

 

Anne

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> "Rain", 1932, Joan Crawford, pre-code.

>

> "The Bitter Tea of General Yen", 1933, Barbara

> Stanwyck, pre-code.

 

I would love to see Rain! I have been anxious to see it ever since they showed clips of it in one of Crawford's TV biographies.

 

I agree about The Bitter Tea of General Yen. Fascinating movie! Interesting that Asian actors were scarce to nonexistent in Hollywood then, so they used Nils Asther, a Sweed, to play the Chinese warlord General Yen.

 

Asther has an interesting bio on imdb. (Link below.) It seems he was blacklisted for breaking for breaking a contract in 1934, suffered a career decline, and by 1949 he was driving a truck. Kind of a Veronica Lake story.

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0039989/bio

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Hi! PEOPLE WILL TALK is one of my favorites, too! I agree, it seldom gets mentioned, and even Cary Grant deprecated it himself. I don't know why it's been considered a "misfire" by some because I find it one of the wittiest and most intelligent presentations of what it means to be a doctor ever put on film. Not to mention the love story is one of the most unconventional I've ever seen!

 

But then, I'm biased: Joseph L. Mankiewicz has always been one of my favorite writer/producer/directors.

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Hi movieman1957,

 

Yes, "Double Wedding" is hilarious. In fact, I think it is actually funnier than a few of the Thin Man films. I love William Powell's bohemian character in this film, living in a trailer next to the bar....and the giant gong hanging in his window to call him to the phone! *lol*

 

Good stuff!

 

I think anyone who loves William Powell & Myrna Loy in the Thin Man series is really doing themselves a disservice if they miss this little gem.

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Hi bobhopefan1940,

 

Well, "Pilot #5" is not your standard Gene Kelly film - you are right about that! No real song & dance bits or anything. But I like his character and think he does a really great job with the role.

 

Actually, all of them in that film do a good job with their roles.

 

I'll definitely watch this one again some day!

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And now for something completely different...

"The Brute Man" with Rondo Hatton-which Universal sold (!) to a B-studio

"Chained For Life" with (Siamese twins) Daisy and Violet Hilton (also featured in "Freaks")

And "Bunny O'Hare-" which reunited Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine...

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I think many Irene Dunne movies, especially the ones without Cary Grant ( :) ) are highly underrated. She was so talented at both drama and comedy. My list of underrated Irene Dunne films includes: Symphony of Six Million (1932), No Other Woman (1933), The Joy of Living (1938), A Guy Named Joe (1943) with Spencer Tracy, and The White Cliffs of Dover (1944). This may sound like heresy to some, but I much prefer the grim, non-musical Anna and the King of Siam (1946), which starred Dunne and Rex Harrison, to the later musical version, The King and I, with Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner. Further, I think Love Affair (1939), which starred Dunne and Charles Boyer, was as good if not better than its more famous remake, An Affair to Remember (1957) starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr. And although My Favorite Wife (1940) is not really an "underrated" movie, I can't resist adding that, in my opinion, it was far better than its remake Move Over Darling (1963), with Doris Day and James Garner. I would love to see the original Magnificent Obsession (1935), starring Dunne and Robert Taylor, which has been overshadowed by its 1954 remake starring Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson. But I can't remember the 1935 version having been shown recently. (Perhaps I simply missed it.)

 

Irene Dunne: The queen of forgotten but wonderful originals overshadowed by more-famous remakes.

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You know, speaking of more obscure favorites...I was able to watch about 4 of the Kay Francis films that were shown in that group last month, and I really enjoyed each and every one of them.

 

A couple I'd never seen on the schedule before, so I assume they are fairly obscure...but I quite enjoyed them.

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