Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The Big Street


bradtexasranger
 Share

Recommended Posts

She was in other dramas, but there often was a dash of humor to them, a la The Thin Man.

 

I missed all but the last 10 minutes of the movie--what made her change her tune about Henry Fonda? (I've seen her putting him down in the Carol Burnett tribute to Ball, so I know her character makes a big turnaround.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be honest, I was only mostly half watching it while doing other things except for the last part where they dance so my take on it may be wrong. I think she just melted after he stuck with her through thick and thin, all her insults and taking care of her through her illness. Anyone feel free to correct me if I'm off base.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you are right--even when the movies themselves were dramatic or had a lot of serious moments, Ball tended to play supporting characters that either introduced some comic relief or were so pathetic as to be funny. I am thinking of the supporting parts she played in Stage Door (1937), Having Wonderful Time (1938), Joy of Living (1938) and Dance, Girl, Dance (1940).

 

She seemed to play a lot of unsuccessful man-chasers and jealous girl-buddies. Whether the parts were supposed to be funny or not, she made them be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I will have to check out some of her dramatic performances too. Last night I was too busy trying (again) to get through La Dolce Vita, which I recorded last week. (*groans*) I just can't seem to read the subtitles fast enough to catch what the characters are saying and watch what they are doing. But I digress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was clueless to her dramatic roles too, but I really enjoyed her in "Five Came Back," "Twelve Crowded Hours" and "Two Smart People." (Now that was a Mardi Gras!)

Pintorini, you're so right-Italian movies and Spanish movies always have a lot of subtitles and they're fast and furious!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought she was really good. And Henry Fonda was too. Here is what I wrote in my LJ film review:

 

 

 

The Big Street (1942 - Lucille Ball, Henry Fonda) was a fairly decent movie. Lucille Ball was fabulous playing a selfish, self-centered, cruel, gold-digger nightclub singer...and Henry Fonda did an excellent job of playing the biggest weenie of a man ever in the history of the universe - a busboy who was in love with her...and as a consequence, allowed her to walk all over him to extraordinary degrees, making excuse after excuse for her poor behavior.

 

As I said, both actors were fabulous. But I was really disturbed by Little Pink's (Henry Fonda's) degree of weeniehood. Never have I seen a male character walked all over and abused to this extent and still keep coming back for more. I mean, sure, she was physically beautiful...but that was truly the only thing likeable about her! And so that really kinda turned him into not only a weenie...but a SHALLOW weenie, IMO. Although that was not the intent. The intent was to show Pink as a man in love with the unattainable....but who refused to give up.

 

I have to give Henry Fonda credit - he did an excellent job of groveling his way through this film. And Lucille Ball...well, put it this way: Lucy Ricardo she was NOT!

 

In the end, "Her Majesty" (that is what Pink called her - SERIOUSLY) finally 'got it', stopped chasing the shallow rich guys, and fell in love with Pink.

 

And then....she died.

 

No 'happily ever after' here, I'm afraid.

 

But then...there are not that many 'happily ever afters' in real life in any event.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Live Journal.

 

It's a fairly popular blog site. ;)

 

My particular blog is a mixture of:

 

1. Classic film reviews of pretty much every film I watch (unless I've reviewed it before)

2. Graphics-related stuff (love playing around with PhotoShop)

3. Scifi TV-related reviews and commentary.

4. Details of my adventures when I travel overseas.

5. Whining about work

6. Whining about my personal life.

7. Links to absurdities found on the internet

8. Gushing over the latest hilarious thing Jon Stewart said.

9. Ranting over the latest not-so hilarious thing Dubya said/did.

10. Surveys, quizzes and games that are making the rounds among my friends.

 

and my latest hobby...

 

11. Lusting over the guys on Prison Break.

 

Fascinating, huh?

 

Just ask JonParker! *lol*

 

If he is still awake..... ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> She was in other dramas, but there often was a dash

> of humor to them, a la The Thin Man.

>

> I missed all but the last 10 minutes of the

> movie--what made her change her tune about Henry

> Fonda? (I've seen her putting him down in the Carol

> Burnett tribute to Ball, so I know her character

> makes a big turnaround.)

 

Her health started to fail. According to the doctor it is all in her head that she has gotten worse. So he throws a big party in her honor, He also steals a dress so she can wear it. But the show must go on. So after bribing and fooling people to come to this party in honor of some phony royalty (her) the party was a great success. She even gets to sing her trademark song. She realizes because Nicely Nicely misspoke because he thought once again Pinks was in trouble with law because of the dress.how much Pinks sacrificed for her and she is all starry eyed about him. She wants to walk up the stairs with Pinks and that would make her the happiest person. But she never makes it and drops dead in his arms.

IMO Lucy was a better dramatic actress then comedic. Like Carol Burnette this was the first time I ever saw Lucy in a movie. She was something else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...