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FILMS THAT SEEM "GONE WITH THE WIIINNNNDDDD....!!!!!!!


ganavon1
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There are a lot of films-feature and made for television-that seem to have dropped out of sight. Here are a few that I like and please add your favorites.....

 

ALIAS NICK BEAL Paramount 1948

Ray Milland, Thomas Mitchell, Audrey Totter.

Directed by John Farrow.

 

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE BELL CBS TV 1971

Glen Ford, Dean Jagger, Maurice Evans, Will Geer

Directed by Paul Wendkos

 

 

FEAR NO EVIL Universal MCA 1969 TV

Louis Jourdan, Linda Day George, Carroll O'Conner, Wilfrid Hyde-White

Directed by Paul Wendkos

 

WORLD WITHOUT END Allied Artists 1958

Rod Taylor, Hugh Marlowe

 

 

THE DEVIL COMMANDS Columbia 1941

Boris Karloff

 

 

Ok friends-I started this so keep em coming!

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Talking about television mini-series...

 

Right now, I have the four DVD BBC mini-series "Fall Of Eagles" in my Netflix queue. I plan on placing the four DVD BBC mini-series "Brideshead Revisited" in the queue. "Brideshead Revisited", I missed during the original television broadcast. I would like to put the late 1967, or is it 1969?, version of "The Forsyte Saga" in the queue. I never watched the thing on television, but it is seven DVDs. At four DVDs per month rental, "The Forsyte Sage" would be almost two months worth of Netflix stuff and...well, I cannot think of a good reason NOT to rent the DVD set. So, into the queue it goes.

 

Hmmm...."Upstairs, Downstairs"? Oh boy, that series is a LOT of DVDs...

 

 

Rusty

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The British made the best series. One of my early favorites that is in my Netflix queue is "Danger UXB." Also the series' with Alec Guiness - "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy"and "Smiley's People." I'm currently in the middle of "Jewel In The Crown." Man, was Timothy Pigott-Smith nasty.

 

My favorite American series was the mother of all miniseries "Centennial." It was a 26 hour marathon that I thought held up really well until the last episode or two. I would have bought it when it was on VHS but the $300 was a bit much.

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I can't find Woman in Red (1935) with Stanwyck. Not even an illegal bootleg copy on eBay. (*Sniffs*). There are some other movies like that--i.e., 30's vehicles for major stars which, although they are not "lost" films, are evidently so bad that they only get played about once every ten years or so at 4:00 a.m.

 

:(

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?The Brotherhood of the Bell? was a good and rare made for TV movie or mini-series with a top Hollywood cast. It was about a kind of fraternity whose members helped each other in business when they got out of college, including killing people for business purposes.

 

Other rare films are:

 

?Rain? with Joan Crawford, based on a famous play from the late ?20s. This is the play the gangsters are watching in ?Scarface? with Paul Muni.

 

?The Bitter Tea of General Yen? with Barbara Stanwyck, one of the best movies of the 1930s.

 

?The Man Who Reclaimed His Head," a 1934 commie movie about nasty capitalists conspiring to start WW I.

 

?On The Beach?, an excellent anti-atomic-war film. Very frightening. (It?s not too late, brother.)

 

The high-quality restored 2-hour original theatrical version of ?Greed?, as shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1965. Most modern prints of this film today have been ruined with hundreds of still frame slide-shows inserted into the moving picture, and garish colors artificially added by means of computers and Ted Turner?s ?colorization? process.

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I love "Pink Horse". TCM has aired it several times. Robert Montgomery seems odd trying to pay a "tough guy", but he seems like his movie character is trying to pay a tough guy. So I can't tell if he is over acting because he didn't know how to play a tough guy or if he wanted his character to seem to be over acting because he was an average guy trying to play a tough guy. Anyway, I love the film. A lot of interesting ideas in it. Some of it was filmed around Santa Fe, New Mexico during a real Zazobra celebration.

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Oh, and I think "Stranger on the Third Floor" is not played enough by TCM. This is just about "officially" the first American "film noir" movie. Very creative and historical. Although a low-budget film, many later noirs copied much of its stylized photography and dream-like nightmarish mood.

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Thanks for the information.

 

The last scene in the film is one of the most shocking I've ever seen in any film. All during the movie we occasionally see a street preacher set up in a park in some city in Australia, and he's trying to win converts since the last people alive on earth are there in Australia and will be dying within a few months.

 

We see the preacher and his audience several times during the film, and behind him is a large banner that reads, "It's not too late, brother." We don't think much about the banner until the very end of the film, where they show street scenes all around Australia showing that there are no longer any people alive. Everyone is now dead. Everyone on earth is now dead.

 

At the very end of the movie, they show the place in the park where the street preacher used to give sermons, and now there is no one there because everyone is dead. We see the banner flapping in the wind in the background. Then the camera begins to move in on the banner, so that finally it fills the whole movie screen, and then it dawns on us (the movie audience) that the message on the banner is meant for us... "It's not too late, brother," meaning that all of us should work to try to prevent international atomic war.

 

That was a pretty shocking message for 1959, and the way it was presented to the audience drew all of us into the film plot at the end of the movie. While the message on the banner had been a religious message during the movie, that last scene turned it into a secular message designed for everyone in the audience.

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"STRANGLER OF THE SWAMP'

PRC

Frank Wisbar's own remake of the 1936 film"FAEHMANN MARIA" which starred Sybille Schmitz, was done in a very well way with Rosemary La Planche and BLAKE EDWARDS(!). Charles Middletown plays the revenge-driven spirit.

Well done and should be screened!

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ALIAS NICK BEAL is an excellent film, I taped it 10 years ago when The Movie Channel used to show more old films. Sadly, I have never seen it shown since. I would add NIGHT WORLD (1931) with Boris Karloff, and PAROLE GIRL (1933) with Mae Clarke, also RAMONA (1936) a beautiful three strip Technicolor Fox production with Loretta Young.

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On the Beach is indeed a fascinating movie, if obviously very heavy. The dialogue, the acting, and the visuals are all so gritty and brass-tacks. Even though the threat of nuclear war was a big issue in the late 50's, it struck me that the movie was ahead of its time in its realism. I was particularly awed by Fred Astaire's performance in an intense dramatic role.

 

Another late-50's movie with a degree of realism about war that I found surprising: In Love and War (1958).

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Well, here's my contribution to our "wall" of Wanted Posters:

 

"The Rising of the Moon" (1957)

 

And (to plagiarize Mr. Lightfoot) I gotta say, I just don't get it; a full-color John Ford film from the '50's, starring Tyrone Power, filmed in Ireland, did good box office & got good reviews . . yet the last time I caught it on TV was 1981, and according to TCM, AMC, Bravo, Amazon, Movies Unlimited & Blockbuster, it's just plain unavailable, thanks for askin', don't call us we'll call you, have a nice day, NEXT!

 

And while I'm beating that drum, what's up with "The Luck of Ginger Coffey"? Granted a pretty minor project for the late, great Robert Shaw, but I liked it fine & dandy, and any more it shows up only on obscure satellite channels @ 3 a.m., or as bad bootleg copies for too much $ on eBay.

 

I mean, I did bleed my wallet dry to score a VHS of "Dr. Syn, Alias the Scarecrow", bu there comes a limit, right?

 

Gadzooks, Batman, is there no justice?!!

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I feel your pain, klondike. The tyranny of the "unavailable" movie must be stopped.

 

Surely there is a cost-effective solution that would both satisfy consumer needs and afford a reasonable profit to the middlefolks who acquire the rights and perform all the other necessary hocus-pocus in bringing old movies to the home-viewing market. On the technology front, the cable and telecom banditos have made grandiose claims about the possibilities of Video On Demand-type services ... but I have a sneaking suspicion that a massive database of "every" movie is, at the very least, years away still, and that even the most comprehensive would still omit the lost treasures I crave.

 

Maybe we at the TCM messaging think tank can engineer a solution to this abysmal market failure. Thoughts, anyone???

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Today I thought of one I've always liked, but you never see anymore. It's a fanciful sci-fi/adventure movie called "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" (circa 1963-64). An astronaut is stranded alone on Mars (with a little monkey, actually), and the story parallels to some degree the original, only with aliens instead of indigenous island people. It's very well done (in color). I taped it decades ago, and I haven't seen it on TV since then. Adam West has a supporting role as the astronaut who didn't survive the crash onto Mars' surface. I wonder who knows it these days.

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