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Movies where a line should had been used.


hamradio
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Have there been movies where a situation arrived and the character should had said something?  Could have improved it!

 

In "Heidi" (1965) the towns people was giving Alp-Oehi the evil look, basically staring a hole though him.

 

I give anything if he said, Why don't you take a picture, it will last longer! :lol: 

 

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Are ya KIDDIN' here, ham ol' buddy?! Why, there are probably THOUSANDS of flicks I've seen in which I would have liked to see one character tell off the other.

 

Here's just ONE instance...

 

REBECCA (1940)

alfred_hitchcock_rebecca_poster_shop_new

 

What I wouldn't give to just ONCE see Joan turn around on Judith here and say somethin' like:

 

"LOOK you old crone! I'M the boss around here now and could fire, or as you Brits say, 'SACK' your ugly butt in a freakin' New York minute IF I was a mind to. And so, what say you shut your damn pie hole about the 'FIRST Mrs. De Winter' once and for all, OKAY?!"

 

(...yep, now THAT I'd pay good money to see, alright!!!)

 

LOL

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Didn't Professor Higgins in "My Fair Lady" say something to Eliza like:

 

"Where the devil are my slippers, Eliza?"
 

Now she should have said something back like:

 

"Go find them yourself, you old codger with the bad toupee!"
 

At least that's what I would have said after all that abuse.

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Didn't Professor Higgins in "My Fair Lady" say something to Eliza like:

 

"Where the devil are my slippers, Eliza?"

 

Now she should have said something back like:

 

"Go find them yourself, you old codger with the bad toupee!"

 

At least that's what I would have said after all that abuse.

 

In the proper grammatical manner in which you wrote that new line for Eliza, I assume this would've been AFTER her schooling in the art of English language elocution, right CG?!

 

(...'cause that whole "Go find them yourself, you old codger with the bad toupee" line, sure doesn't sound very cockney to ME, CG!!!)

 

;)

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In the proper grammatical manner in which you wrote that new line for Eliza, I assume this would've been AFTER her schooling in the art of English language elocution, right CG?!

 

(...'cause that whole "Go find them yourself, you old codger with the bad toupee" line, sure doesn't sound very cockney to ME, CG!!!)

 

;)

Argh, yer a blooming one, ya are, Dargo.

 

Next I suppose I will need to use Cockney rhyming slang to please you?

 

Okay, call me on the dog and bone, or come up the apples and pears to discuss this, since I'm all Jack Jones.

 

Either that or you will end up in Davy Jone's locker and I'm not monkeying around.

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Argh, yer a blooming one, ya are, Dargo.

 

Next I suppose I will need to use Cockney rhyming slang to please you?

 

Okay, call me on the dog and bone, or come up the apples and pears to discuss this, since I'm all Jack Jones.

 

Either that or you will end up in Davy Jone's locker and I'm not monkeying around.

 

THAT'S better!

 

(...'cuse me now while I finish me bangers 'n mash, love...might 'ave those apples and pears for dessert later, though)

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Here is a reverse example:

 

In La Nuit de Varennes (1983) a member of Royalty (Hanna Schygulla) slaps Thomas Paine (Harvey Keitel) and then explains why she did it.

 

Better had she said nothing, just walked away. It wasn't that much of a mystery and the viewer would have been better served if allowed to reason for oneself. Like that little spark of enlightment that adds to the drama.

 

This is one of my favorite movies of all time and sadly it has yet to be transferred to DVD. A wonderful movie also starring Jean-Louis Barrault and Marcello Mastrianni (sp?)

 

**

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In 1982 there was a rather minor and coarse comedy called Jekyll and Hyde...Together Again.  There is one line I vaguely remember.  At one point the Jekyll character is caught in bed with the girl's father.  The protagonist gets out of this situation by promising to do an important medical procedure the father is interested in.  Or something like that.  Anyway, the father responds, well I can't actually print the response because of the message board's censor functions, and because I don't remember the exact words.  But it amounts to "have lots of sex with my blessings."

 

The point of this questionable anecdote is that if Spencer Tracy had said this to Sidney Poitier when he first meets him in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner the world would be a much better place.

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There's so much that is false with Judgement at Nuremberg.  Like when Schell goes on arguing that Germans should not be held collectively responsible, when actually only a few highly compromised judges are on trial.  On when Widmark goes on about the Holocaust, something the defendants are only tangentially involved.  Or when one of Tracy's fellow judges decides to support cold war realpolitik and support leniency despite overwhelming evidence.  On all three occasions, "Cut the BS" comes immediately to mind.

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Here is a reverse example:

 

In La Nuit de Varennes (1983) a member of Royalty (Hanna Schygulla) slaps Thomas Paine (Harvey Keitel) and then explains why she did it.

 

Better had she said nothing, just walked away. It wasn't that much of a mystery and the viewer would have been better served if allowed to reason for oneself. Like that little spark of enlightment that adds to the drama.

 

This is one of my favorite movies of all time and sadly it has yet to be transferred to DVD. A wonderful movie also starring Jean-Louis Barrault and Marcello Mastrianni (sp?)

 

**

 

I can't say I remember that exact scene very well, I just had to chime in because I totally love that movie too, and it's not mentioned much anymore.  Great cast, story, music, visuals -- and Marcello excels as the aging Casanova!

 

hqdefault.jpg

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I can't say I remember that exact scene very well, I just had to chime in because I totally love that movie too, and it's not mentioned much anymore.  Great cast, story, music, visuals -- and Marcello excels as the aging Casanova!

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

In one of the coaches, no doubt. Either in the two-seater with Jean-Louis when we first meet him or in the larger coach later on where five people sit and converse. This hang dog look comes over him from time to time. A couple of ladies are naturally interested in his history and at one point he is trying to answer when his gaze falls upon a little herd of cattle grazing in the pasture as his mind falters. A time perhaps for him to do a little of that.

 

I'm glad to hear someone else is a fan of this movie. It is sooo rewarding. I'm not likely to fall in with Royalty but I almost wept when Hanna walked across the room ... ...    (spoiler avoided).

 

Vive Le Roi !!!

 

:o

what am I saying?

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I can't say I remember that exact scene very well, I just had to chime in because I totally love that movie too, and it's not mentioned much anymore.  Great cast, story, music, visuals -- and Marcello excels as the aging Casanova!

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

 

She? looks like Lon Chaney in drag. :lol:

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She? looks like Lon Chaney in drag. :lol:

 

Well ham, then just chalk this up as yet another case of an otherwise very handsome man not exactly being able to carry off that whole drag thing.

 

(...I'm thinking of Cary Grant in that "War Bride" flick here of course)

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