Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

"Shop Around the Corner"


otterhere
 Share

Recommended Posts

One of those about which I think, upon seeing it listed, "Oh, I've seen that a hundred times..." Then find myself engrossed in it once again? That's got to be the mark of a great movie; same with "Gone With the Wind" and "The Wizard of Oz" (alas, not with "Casablanca" or "Citizen Kane"!!!)... Also, did anyone see a marked similarity between SATC and the Britcom, "Are You Being Served?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really need to start catching the Robert Osbourn commentary, lol; he seems to answer all my questions??? Sorry, but what's the connection between the man you mention by name and the Britcom AYBS? Same number of clerks (6), and the same desperation to make a sale... Even the "dandy" with the fine clothing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's an all-time favorite of mine, too, no matter how often I see it. It ranks as just about one of the most utterly charming movies ever made. I just love William Tracy's character, "Pepe" and Felix Bressart. Oh, I love 'em all! TCM has some nice behind-the-scenes stills up on the website for any who'd care to see. They also aired the amusing trailer, "hosted" by Frank Morgan and featuring the diminutive genius behind it all, Ernst Lubitsch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yay! This was the first classic I ever saw! I went and bought it on dvd the next day and said to myself, "You know, I might get into these things." Now look at me! I'm a regular fanatic!

 

And I love the trailor with Morgan... It's also on the dvd. I actually first fell in love with "You've Got Mail" and they had an extensive trailor on Shop Around The Corner on that. And that's it... I fell in love with classics!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love this movie, too -- and I think it's got such a great supporting cast. I really love the end - when Frank Morgan is listing that Christmas Dinner to the new boy, Rudy -- and you realise that the store is his family, and he's making sure that Rudy knows he's got one in Budapest.

 

I like the Judy Garland version, too -- on bad days I go around humming the song "I don't care .. ."

 

Julie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love Felix Bressart as the older clerk, who always runs and hides when the boss asks for someone's honest opinon. But I have to say that the cast as a whole is simply terrific. The two female clerks who were there before Klara was hired are also good.

 

Also the cut from the scene in which Klara sells one of the hideous cigarette boxes to a customer to a pan along the front of the store, revealing that the cigarette boxes are now drastically marked down is simply priceless. That is storytelling in movies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love both Shop Around the Corner and In the Good Old Summertime, and own them both on DVD. I never get tired of them! The answer to the "bowlegged" question ~ as far as I can remember, Jimmy Stewart just mentions the rumor that he's bowlegged (very angrily), but Van Johnson actually stood on the stairs, pulled up his pants legs and showed off his legs along with those strange things he used to hold up his socks! (I'm not sure what they're called - gaiters, maybe?). I really need to watch SATC again, because I fell asleep just before the end of it the other night (shame on me), which is why I'm not sure about the bowlegged incident.

 

To everyone on the boards ~ have a very happy Thanksgiving!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure that I saw In the Good Old Summertime first (I've been a Garland fan since I was young - and remember my father telling me when she'd died), and then discovered SATC - which I enjoy more -- because the supporting cast is so much better.

 

Peggy24 - thanks for setting us straight on the bowlegged question!

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Julie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love both Shop Around the Corner and In the Good Old Summertime, and own them both on DVD. I never get tired of them! The answer to the "bowlegged" question ~ as far as I can remember, Jimmy Stewart just mentions the rumor that he's bowlegged (very angrily), but Van Johnson actually stood on the stairs, pulled up his pants legs and showed off his legs along with those strange things he used to hold up his socks! (I'm not sure what they're called - gaiters, maybe?).

 

I think you mean garters.

 

And if Jimmy Stewart wasn't bow-legged when he did SHOP AROUND THE CORNER, he surely was by the time he finished making all those 1950s westerns for Anthony Mann.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really like Margaret Sullavan though if you really pay attention to the pivotal cafe scene in both "The Shop Around The Corner" and "In The Good Old Summertime" (the sequence with the whole pants raising episode) it's clearly revealed that Judy Garland is the more assured comedienne...she adds a lot of hilarious little nuances to her delivery that Maggie seemed to miss in playing virtually the same scene. Not only was Judy musically gifted by I think her deliciously absurd sense of humor really shines through there...Garland and Van Johnson also had superb chemistry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This could probably go on the 'miscast' thread, because I see Mararet Sullavan more as a dramatic actress than comedian. She always looks so serious and intense, even when she's smiling. One other thing about her that annoys me is her voice, I keep yelling "speak up", she talks in such a low key, she reminds me of Jean Arthur with her prissy ways, Jean is another one who doesn't convince me in comedies. In A Foreign Affair, if I had been Lund, I would have grabbed Jimmy Cagney's grapefruit if she had pursed her lips one more time.

 

Back to Margaret though, she was wonderful in Cry Havoc and the Mortal Storm and so many other dramatic roles, but I guess they all had to do whatever they were given at the time of the studio system.

 

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lol! Your post reminds me of when I first saw TSATC...I absolutely detested Margaret Sullavan, and my opinion didn't change for a long time. I finally warmed to her in THREE COMRADES and the intense charm of Shop won me over to the point where I can see the point of her irritating qualities; Jimmy calls her some pretty hard but accurate names and we in the audience can see what he means. She is "cold and snippy like an old maid". She's never going to be a favorite, however. Can you believe she was the original "Sabrina Fair" on Broadway? That I find to be an error in casting big time.

 

As for A FOREIGN AFFAIR, I have to agree. I always thought John Lund was mad to leave Dietrich for her. That Wilder had to practically turn La Dietrich into a Nazi in order to justify his switch is evidence---coupled with the rather mean trick of making her look so awfully dowdy---that he shares our opinion. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Miss G - I guess that I was lucky -- my first Margaret Sullavan movie was Three Comrades -- and she's ethereal in that - IMHO. Or maybe it was Mortal Storm? The other one that I really like her in is The Shopworn Angel - again with Jimmy Stewart. I think she also died too young.

 

My take on her in TSATC -- is that she and Jimmy are the straight people in the midst of all that comedy around them. They are the ones that are supposed to be pursuing 'intellectual' companionship.

 

BTW - I never noticed that Jimmy pulled up the legs of his pants at the end!

 

Julie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Julie:

 

Ms Goddess is right ~ Jimmy Stewart does pull up his pants legs at the end, but not as "dramatically" or memorably as Van Johnson (smashing his hat on his head and stomping up stairs with his pants legs up). I realized that after I sent that post the other day. My only excuse for not remembering is that I fell asleep just before the end of the movie (shame on me). I had the DVD and was going to try to get the last scene to check, but I just haven't had time this past week.

 

Anyway, I heard a rumor from somewhere (I'm not sure where) that Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan were engaged for a time. Anyone know about this? I also heard that she committed suicide (although not because of JS, but later in life) by drug overdose. True or false? Anyone know the particulars? She sure didn't seem like the type to go that route (although they say it's the quiet ones you have to watch out for).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure that they were engaged, but I have heard that he was definately smitten with her -- and that it's one reason he married late. She did tend to get involved/married with guys that were close to him - Henry Fonda, and his agent (and I think there was one other?)

 

Yes, she did commit suicide in the early 60's -- still waters run deep?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She did tend to get involved/married with guys that were close to him - Henry Fonda, and his agent (and I think there was one other?)

 

Yes, she did commit suicide in the early 60's -- still waters run deep?>>

 

After her marriage to Fonda dissolved (it only lasted maybe a year), she married William Wyler and then Leland Hayward.

 

She had a nervous breakdown from which she never really recovered.

 

Her daughter, Brooke Hayward, wrote an autobiography called "Haywired" that goes into a great detail about the mental problems of Margaret, Brooke's sister, Bridget and her brother, Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<>

 

I disagree with this appraisal of Garland as the more superb commedienne compared to Sullivan. I'm a great admirer of Judy's and also own the DVDs (and VHS's) of both films. While I agree that Judy plays her final "revelation" scene with Van Johnson charmingly, IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME is much more of a broad and light comedy than the more serious, subtle, adult and detailed THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER.

 

The final scene of ITGOS, for example, is entirely comedic, with Johnson hitting Judy with outrageous scenarios for her "beau ideal," such as ridiculous name "Newspickle," and the bit about combing the few strands of hair he has left over the front of his head to "hide" his balding pate. However, after Johnson reveals the harsh "realities" of Judy's pen pal, her only real comment is, "Well, I think this whole thing is just ridiculous," leaving little doubt that, even if what Johnson's account was true, she'd recover from the "loss."

 

By contrast, it's made clear in TSATC, that Sullavan's hopes of romantic fulfillment are just about all that keep her going in the very dark days of a Depression-riddled, prewar Budapest. For example, while Garland resides in comfortable surroundings with a youngish stylish aunt who is a successful dressmaker and doesn't seem to really need the job in ITGOS, it's well-established in TSATC that Sullavan desperately needs her job in order to help support her elderly aunt and grandmother. (Stewart even makes a reference to their less comfortable economic circumstances in the final scene of the film.) While, in ITGOS, Garland's "Veronica Fisher" has lost her job purely as a matter of economics ("it's the dull season"), it's strongly implied that Sullavan left her last position because she was sexually harrassed

 

When Stewart reveals the harsh "realities" of Sullavan's pen pal, she, unlike Garland is really devastated at the news. She practically collapses onto the bench in the store and is choking back tears as she believes all her hopes have been dashed and practically sobs: "Oh, I thought I was the inspiration for all those beautiful thoughts...Now to find out he was just copying them out of a book....He probably didn't mean a single one of them."

 

Because of these basic, inherent but blatant differences in theme and intent, I would argue that despite some superficial similarities in situation and dialogue, the "revelation" scenes in TSATC and ITGOS couldn't be more different. Moreover, for Sullavan to have adopted the lighthearted larkish, slightly broader comedic style that Garland does in playing this scene in ITGOS would have been entirely inappropriate and incongruous for a more serious and mature work like TSATC, and I think Sullavan plays her scene in this film as well or better than any actress could, including Garland.

 

They're both highly entertaing films with talented casts, but I think any honest critical evaluation of the two films would find THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER the vastly superior work, as a film compared to the enjoyable but much more superficial, broader and less well-constructed IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME which adopts a happy-go-luck musical comedy mien to skirt over many of the more complex, adult and moving themes inherent in the screenplay of the original film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...