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"In the Spotlight"


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Moirafinnie - Spectacular photo of Vic Morrow.. I agree with you - I thought his best work was in the Combat! t.v. series.

 

I saw the documentary "Memories of Combat!" and remember that he made that comment. I think he said something to the effect that he didn't think he was a star, but rather a comet would flame out before his time.

 

There were lots of documentaries from cast, crew and guest stars and even a special interview from Vic Morrow himself on the DVD Combat sets. They all said he was very intense on the set, but that he had a good sense of humor and was very respectful and nice to all of his co-stars. He never tried to overstep his bounds or hog the spotlight - even if he were the more well-known star at the time. He seemed like a real nice guy - but never got a lot of opportunities to showcase his talent.

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Mongo, thank you, thank you, THANK YOU for such a nice dedication to Vic Morrow on his birthday. That color photo of him you posted is super - his blue eyes were striking. This is one of the best looking photos of him I've seen - he has such craggy good looks. Don't know if anyone else agrees - but I think he was handsome.

 

Vallo - your post was excellent as well.

 

I agree that Vic Morrow should have a Star for all his contributions to the film industry.

 

Thanks again for remembering this fine actor.

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What a wonderful tribute to Vic Morrow. I almost fell off my chair when I saw that color photo of him that Mongo posted. WOW - I don't think Vic Morrow was ever thought of as being "handsome" in the conventional sense - but boy, that guy was really quite good-looking.

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Mythoughts, that's my sentiments too. I thought he was handsome too - but that color photo was really nice.

 

I think he was more than a passing "comet" - he was really a "star" which we lost way too soon.

 

The photo of him smiling was a rarity - Vic Morrow hardly ever smiled - that was a pleasant change.

 

I found his life story interesting in that he drove a taxi-cab in NY and NJ to make ends meet and then on a whim went to audition for Blackboard Jungle. He arrived without an appt. and no lunch money - but he beat out other well known actors for the role of Artie West - namely Steve McQueen.

 

Message was edited by:

movielover11

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What a gorgeously handsome man. The color photo looks like he has a hairy chest - love hairy chests.

 

To Movielover: I haven't read all the posts yet, just was reading your last one - I'd take a cab ride any day if Vic Morrow was the driver - he'd get a big tip from me.

 

I always used to watch Combat! and liked him in that show - but this forum has given me a renewed interest in him - especially seeing these photos of Vic Morrow - my goodness - my Valentine's Day isn't that bad after all - LOL

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Movielover, it was my pleasure. There is no doubt that Vic Morrow deserved a spotlight.

It's easy to see that you are a true-blue fan.

 

Was glad to learn that it was Jennifer who inscribed the stone for her father.

 

It's also nice to know that you all enjoyed the color picture of Vic.

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In the Spotlight: Gladys George

 

The daughter of a British Shakespearean actor, Gladys George was born Gladys Anna Clare on September 13, 1904 while her parents' touring stock company was playing an engagement in Patten, Maine.

 

On stage from age three, Gladys toured with her parents in a vaudeville act called "The Three Clares". She won her first Broadway role in the 1914 production "The Betrothal".

Six years later she tried to launch a film career in "Red Hot Dollars" (1920), but her incipient stardom was halted when she was severely burned in an accident.

 

She went back into stock, returning to Broadway in the early 1930s through the influence of her wealthy second husband Edward H. Fowler.

Screen-tested by Paramount in 1934, George was signed by MGM instead; ironically, it was while on loan-out to Paramount that she scored her biggest film hit, 1936's "Valiant is the Word for Carrie" for which she received a best actress Oscar nomination.

 

For the next several years, George alternated between "weepers" and truculent roles in films: the title role in "Madame X" (1937), Madame DuBarry in "Marie Antoinette" (1938), the Texas Guinan counterpart in "The Roaring Twenties" as the brassy Panama Smith (1939), and the unfaithful wife of Miles Archer in "The Maltese Falcon" (1941).

Other films included "Straight Is the Way" with Franchot Tone, "They Gave Him a Gun" with Spencer Tracy, "Here I Am a Stranger" with Richard Dix, "The House Across the Bay", "The Way of All Flesh", "The Hard Way", "Christmas Holiday" with Deanna Durbin, "The Best Years of Our Lives" as Hortense Derry, "Flamingo Road" with Crawford, "Bright Leaf", "Lullaby of Broadway" as Doris Day's mom, "He Ran All the Way" as Garfield's mom, "Detective Story", etc.

 

She didn't really like Hollywood much, but the money was better than on Broadway. She essayed character parts in her last years in Hollywood, culminating with a good comedy role in "It Happens Every Thursday" (1953) and a smattering of television.

 

Gladys George's relatively early death may have been the result of a barbiturate overdose, though she'd been a hard drinker and suffering from throat cancer for quite some time.

She passed away of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 54 in 1954.

Although married 4 times, she died alone.

 

I'll always remember Gladys George as the brassy 'off-key canary' Panama Smith belting out "In a Shanty in Old Shanty Town" with her crush James Cagney in "The Roaring Twenties".

 

No star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for the talented blonde actress.

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[nobr]That's a beautiful picture of Gladys George to accompany your sensitive profile, Mongo. I caught her Madame X within the last year on TCM and found her to be the least sentimental and self-pitying of any of the actresses who've assayed the part. She was also very attractive in many scenes. Her part in The Hard Way is too brief but beautifully played. I also love that The Roaring Twenties role of hers as well, particularly, the last scene, when she cradles Cagney's head gently on the snowy church steps, and, in reply to a cop's query about the deceased, Panama Smith says, "He's dead."

Cop: Well, who is this guy?

Panama Smith: This is Eddie Bartlett.

Cop: Well, how're you hooked up with him?

Panama Smith: I could never figure it out.

Cop: What was his business?

Panama Smith: He used to be a big shot.[/nobr]

 

roaringtwenties.jpg

Partners Cagney and George in conference.

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Another (great) Dame without a star...

Loved her in just about anything, Miles Archer's wife in 'The Maltese Falcon, Detective Story, and of course Panama Smith in The Roaring Twenties etc..

Shame she died so young....

 

 

vallo

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Hi Mongo,

 

Another great choice......

 

Here was a person who consistantly leapt off the screen and made you watch her, no matter how good or bad the movie.

Not too many people could steal scenes from Norma Shearer and John Barrymore, but she did in "Marie Antoinette".......... A true star!!

 

Larry

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Thank you, dear Mongo, for that spotlight you wrote on one of my tippy-top favorites of them all: ROBERT RYAN. I can't get enough of the guy, whether he plays mean or plays sweet. ON DANGEROUS GROUND is one heck of a film and one of the grandest screen performances ever.

 

I also think he was terribly attractive with that irrisistible combination of rugged looks and intelligence.

 

Miss G

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> Thank you, dear Mongo, for that spotlight you wrote

> on one of my tippy-top favorites of them all: ROBERT

> RYAN. I can't get enough of the guy, whether he

> plays mean or plays sweet. ON DANGEROUS GROUND is

> one heck of a film and one of the grandest screen

> performances ever.

>

> I also think he was terribly attractive with that

> irrisistible combination of rugged looks

> and intelligence.

>

> Miss G

 

Robert Ryan was Irish,a liberal, and from Chicago. What a terrific combination !

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Moira, thanks for the inclusion of the pic from "The Roaring Twenties" with Cagney and George, and the dialogue of one of my favorite conclusions on film. Good stuff.

 

Miss G, I'm glad you enjoyed the profile of the outstanding actor Robert Ryan.

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