Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
bansi4

"In the Spotlight"

Recommended Posts

Marty (Igor) with Madeline Kahn

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

Marty (Igor) with Teri Garr & Gene Wilder

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Spotlight: GLYNIS JOHNS

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

The daughter of the Welsh actor Mervyn Johns and concert pianist Alys Steele, Glynis Johns was born on October 5, 1923, in Pretoria, South Africa, while her parents were on tour there.

 

With a career spanning seven decades, Johns is often cited as the "complete actress", who happens to be a trained pianist and singer. She is also an accomplished dancer, and was qualified to teach ballet by age ten.

 

Glynis Johns debuted on the London stage at age 12 with the role of Ursula in ?Buckie?s Bears (1935) and continued with performances in Lillian Hellman?s ?The Children?s Hour,? ?St. Helena? and ?The Melody That Got Lost,?

 

Her first big screen role arrived in 1938 with "South Riding", in which she promisingly portrayed the stubborn daughter of Ralph Richardson. She went on to give powerful supporting parts in British films, such as Michael Powell?s top-notch "The Invaders/49th Parallel", "Adventures of Tartu" and "Vacation From Marriage", and appeared with her father in "Halfway House". On the London stage, Johns was cast in the title role of ?Peter Pan? in 1943.

 

However, the actress had her first real victory in the blockbuster "Miranda" in 1948, starring as a mermaid.

Other films included, "No Highway in the Sky" with James Stewart, "The Magic Box", Disney's "The Sword and the Rose" & "Rob Roy", "The Beachcomber", etc.

 

She made a successful transition to Hollywood, appearing in "The Court Jester" as Danny Kaye's love interest, followed by "All Mine to Give", "Another Time, Another Place" with Lana Turner, "Shake Hands with the Devil" with James Cagney, and "Papa's Delicate Condition" with Jackie Gleason.

 

Johns boosted her international popularity in 1960 when director Fred Zinnemann cast her in the supporting role of Mrs. Firth, the hotelkeeper who sets her sights on Peter Ustinov, in "The Sundowners. The role handed her an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. She would also get a Golden Globe nomination best support in "The Chapman Report".

 

Johns gathered even more attention when she portrayed Winifred Banks, David Tomlinson?s batty suffragette wife and mother of Julie Andrews? charges, in the comedy/musical "Mary Poppins". In between, she appeared in guest roles in numerous TV series, and starred in her own short-lived sitcom ?Glynis? (CBS, 1963).

 

In the 1990s she was a hoot in "While You Were Sleeping", and "The Ref".

Her most recent film appearance was in the 1999 film "Superstar", in which she played the grandmother of the lead character.

 

Johns also had success on stage, most memorably in Stephen Sondheim's musical "A Little Night Music". The song "Send in the Clowns" was written with her in mind, and in 1973, she won a Tony award for her role in the musical.

 

Johns has been married four times. One of her husbands was Anthony Forwood, with whom she had her only child, Gareth Forwood (1945?2007), who was a British actor. (Anthony Forwood was later the manager and partner of Sir Dirk Bogarde). She once remarked that she was wed so often because she married all of her lovers.

At age 84 she is still active and attends various functions.

 

The wistful, husky voiced actress nicknamed 'The girl with the upside-down eyes' does not have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Message was edited by: mongo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glynis with Ty Hardin in "The Chapman Report"

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

She was a Golden Globe nominee for best supporting actress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glynis as Elsie in "While You Were Sleeping"

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

Elsie : I don't drink anymore... I don't drink any less, either!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glynis had a veddy distinctive voice, wouldn't you say? I enjoyed "The Chapman Report" mainly for the ****-maniac, Claire Bloom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Spotlight:

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

The essential lead/character actor was born Charles Ambrose Bickford in Cambridge, Massachusetts, during the first minute of January 1, 1891.

The fifth of seven children, Charles was an intelligent but very independent and unruly child. He was tried and acquitted when he was only nine years old of the attempted murder of a motorist who had accidentally driven over his dog. In his late teens he drifted aimlessly around the United States for a time but eventually graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Before breaking into acting, he worked as a lumberjack, investment promoter, and for a short time ran a pest extermination business.

He eventually joined a road company and travelled throughout the United States for more than a decade where he appeared in various productions. During an appearance in a Broadway play called, "Outside Looking In," he was noticed by legendary filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille and offered a contract with MGM studios. He soon began working with MGM head Louis B. Mayer on a number of projects.

 

He became a star after playing Greta Garbo's lover in "Anna Christie" (1930), but never developed into a romantic lead.

Always of independent mind, strong-willed and quick with his fists, Bickford would frequently argue and sometimes come to blows with Mayer. During the production of DeMille's "Dynamite", he punched out his director and eventually found himself blacklisted from MGM productions on several different occasions. Understandably, his association with MGM was short-lived, and Bickford became an independent actor for several years.

His films of the 1930s included, "East of Borneo", "The Squaw Man", "Thunder Below", "No Other Woman" (on TCM Dec. 6th.), "White Woman", "A Wicked Woman", "Est of Java", "Gangs of New York", "Mutiny in the Big House", "Of Mice and Men", etc.

 

Later, he would sign with 20th Century-Fox studios where it was anticipated he would play leading man roles. However, Bickford was mauled by a lion while filming "East of Java" in 1935. While he recovered from this attack, he would lose his contract with Fox as well as his leading man status due to extensive neck scarring coupled with his advancing age.

 

With the possibility of leading man status gone, Bickford sought character actor roles. Here he would find his greatest success, both in films and later in television.

He would establish himself as a highly sought after, powerful character actor, whose screen appearances commanded attention throughout the remainder of his career. His burly frame and craggy, intense features, coupled with a gruff but powerful voice lent themselves to his being cast in a wide variety of roles in high quality productions. Most often he played lovable father figures, stern businessmen, heavies, ship captains or authority figures of some sort.

 

During the 1940s he would be nominated three times for the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award in "The Song of Bernadette", "The Farmer's Daughter", and "Johnny Belinda".

Every time he was nominated for the Academy Award, one of his co-stars won the Oscar for Best Actress (Jennifer Jones for "The Song of Bernadette" who he became a close friend to) , Loretta Young for "The Farmer's Daughter", and Jane Wyman for "Johnny Belinda".

Other films of the 1940s included, "Reap the Wild Wind", "Mr. Lucky", "Wing and a Prayer", "Fallen Angel", "Duel in the Sun", "The Woman on the Beach", "Brute Force", "Whirlpool", etc.

 

Throughout the remainder of his career he would continue to act in generally prestigious projects including "Guilty of Treason", "Branded", "A Star Is Born", "Not as a Stranger", "The Big Country", "The Unforgiven", "Days of Wine and Roses", etc.

 

He was also a staple on numerous TV dramas.

In his final years, Bickford played rancher John Grainger, owner of the Shiloh Ranch on "The Virginian" NBC television series.

 

He died in Los Angeles of a blood infection at age 76, just days after filming a 1967 Virginian episode. Married just once he had a son, Rex and a daughter, Doris.

He is interred in an unmarked grave at Woodlawn Cemetary, Santa Monica, California.

 

The versatile actor has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. And deservedly so.

 

Message was edited by: mongo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bickford with Kay Johnson in "Dynamite" (1929)

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 

On the set of "Dynamite" with C.B. DeMille

 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for shedding light on Charles Bickford's life and background. A year or so ago, I saw him on TCM in "Hell's Heroes" (1930), directed by William Wyler. It was a version of the "3 Godfathers", and Bickford played the lead. Having mostly seen him as much older and in character roles, I was happy to have the chance to see him as a young man. His backgound certainly matched the rough, gruff roles he later played. cinemafan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appreciate your input, Cinemafan. Indeed Bickford was a character and one heck of an actor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mongo, Thanks for shining on the spotlight on one of our great character actors, Charles Bickford. Charles offered fine support as the head butler in"The Farmer`s Daughter" and the father of deaf mute Jane Wyman in "Johnny Belinda". His leading lady in "Little Miss Marker" was Shirley Temple. Charles was loyal friend and studio head Oliiver Niles to Norman Maine in "A Star Is Born" 1954. He played the small town doctor Dave Runkleman in "Not As A Stranger". With the stature and integrity that Mr. Bickford showed, he became a mentor and friend to Robert Mitchum in this movie. I will never forget the scene in "Days And Wine And Roses", when Charles confronts his daughter, Lee Remick on her failure to stop drinking. Not all actors are meant to be leading men, and Mr. Bickford was an example of the fine roles that a character actor can be offered with the talent he possessed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...