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bansi4

"In the Spotlight"

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Hernandez as Lucas Beauchamp in "Intruder in the Dust" (1949)

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New York Times review:

With his cast, director Clarence Brown has also accomplished some real creative art, especially with Juano Hernandez, who plays the condemned Negro. The stanch and magnificent integrity that Mr. Hernandez displays in his carriage, his manner and expression, with never a flinch in his great self-command, is the bulwark of all the deep compassion and ironic comment in this film.

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Thank you Mongo for this photo. I have lost track of how many times I have watched "Young Man With A Horn". I LOVE THIS MOVIE! Juano will always be Art Hazzard the mentor to Kirk Douglas`s Rick Martin. He was so kind and generous to him, and when Rick lost sight of this, his life fell apart. Doris Day as Jo Jordan and Hoagy Carmichael as Smoke knew how good Art was for Rick. A wonderful movie, cast, and musical standards.

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Cashette, I share your sentiments for the movie "Young Man with a Horn", since years ago I was a BIG Doris Day fan. No doubt that it is a good drama.

 

kpr, both actors are scheduled to appear in the spotlight next year.

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Hernandez with John Garfield in "The Breaking Point"

 

 

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New York Times Review:

 

Juano Hernandez is quietly magnificent as John Garfield's helper and friend.

As a matter of fact, the suggestion of comradeship and trust that is achieved through the character played by Mr. Hernandez, and the pathos created by his death, is not only a fine evidence of racial feeling, but it is one of the most moving factors in the film.

 

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Juano Hernandez has dignity and authority as a Negro judge - New York Times (1955)

 

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Juano Hernandez as a sympathetic butler and Bobby Clark as the lad who is "snatched" are the two bright, believable individuals in this well-meaning but far-fetched picture show - New York Times (1956)

 

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Hi Mongo---Juano Hernandez has been a favorite of mine ever since I first saw Young Man with a Horn. He is the very human heart of that movie and of many others. He has a way of projecting so much compassion, patience and understanding in a dignified way that lifts up even his smallest roles. I enjoyed reading about his determination to improve himself and how he managed to keep a bright, kindly spirit despite his troubled childhood. What a lesson to us all.

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Juano Hernandez was one of the first Puerto Ricans of African descent to become a major star in the United States and one of the first "new style" black screen actors, who neither sang nor danced but played regular characters

He played masculine, sensitive, individualistic men.

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In the Spotlight: SYLVIA SIDNEY

 

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The sad-eyed beauty with a heart-shaped face, an only child, was born Sophia Kosow in The Bronx, New York on August 8, 1910 to Rebecca, a Romanian Jew, and Victor Kosow, a Russian Jewish immigrant. They divorced not long after her birth. Her mother subsequently remarried and Sylvia was adopted by her stepfather, Sigmund Sidney.

Sidney became an actress at the age of 15 as a way of overcoming shyness, using her stepfather's surname as her professional surname. As a student of the Theater Guild's School for Acting, Sidney appeared in several of their productions during the 1920s and earned praise from theater critics.

In 1926, she was seen by a Hollywood talent scout and made her first film appearance later that year.

 

During the Depression, Sidney appeared in a string of films, often playing the girlfriend or the sister of a gangster. She appeared opposite such heavyweight screen idols as Spencer Tracy, Henry Fonda, Joel McCrea, Fredric March, George Raft (a frequent screen partner), and Cary Grant.

Among her films from this period were: "An American Tragedy", "City Streets" and "Street Scene" all in 1931, Alfred Hitchcock's "Sabotage" and Fritz Lang's "Fury" both in 1936, "You Only Live Once" and "Dead End" in 1937. Although Sidney had an arresting, slightly Eurasian face and a lovely figure, these assets were often obscured for the sake of the stark, gritty plots of her films. She was also prominent on the Broadway stage.

 

Her career diminished somewhat during the 1940s. In 1952, she played the role of Fantine in "Les Mis?rables", and her performance was widely praised and allowed her opportunities to develop as a character actress.

Other roles included, "Ladies of the Big House", "Merrily We Go to Hell", "Madame Butterfly", "Good Dame", "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine", "One Third of a Nation", "The Wagons Roll at Night", "Blood on the Sun" with Cagney, "Mr. Ace", "Violent Saturday", "Damien: Omen II", etc.

She turned down the 'casbah girl' lead in "Algiers" (1938) opposite 'Charles Boyer'. Hedy Lamarr went on to fame in the role.

 

She received a Golden Globe nomination and an Academy Award nomination for her supporting role in "Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams" (1973), and was visibly furious at losing to the 10-year-old Tatum O'Neal.

During the filming of "Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams", costar Joanne Woodward remarked how she and her husband, Paul Newman, had a difficult time remembering their anniversary date. Later, Sidney surprised Woodward with a gift of a handmade pillow with the inscription "Paul and Joanne" and their anniversary date.

She also wrote a few books on needlepoint, in which she excelled.

 

As an elderly woman Sidney continued to play supporting screen roles, and was identifiable by her husky voice, the result of a lifetime cigarette smoking habit.

She was the formidable Miss Coral in the film version of "I Never Promised You a Rose Garden" and later was cast as Aidan Quinn's grandmother in the television production of "An Early Frost" (about AIDS) for which she won a Golden Globe Award.

Sidney also played key roles in "Beetlejuice" (directed by longtime Sidney fan Tim Burton) and "Used People" (which co-starred Jessica Tandy, Marcello Mastroianni, Marcia Gay Harden, Kathy Bates and Shirley MacLaine).

Her final role was in another film by Burton, "Mars Attacks!", in which she played a senile grandmother whose beloved Slim Whitman records stop an alien invasion from Mars when played over a louspeaker.

 

Sidney was married three times, she married publisher Bennet Cerf on 1 October 1935, but the couple were divorced shortly after on April 9, 1936. She then was married to actor and acting teacher Luther Adler from 1938 until 1947, by whom she had a son Jacob who predeceased her and a daughter Jody. Her son contracted amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) at age 32. The actress has been a tireless volunteer for the National ALS Foundation ever since.

On March 5,1947 she married radio producer and announcer Carlton Alsop. They were divorced on March 22, 1951.

 

An antique farmhouse in Roxbury, Connecticut was Miss Sidney's home for decades, before moving to suburban Danbury, Connecticut the last several years of her life.

She died from throat cancer in New York City at the age of 88, after a career spanning more than 70 years.

 

Sidney has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to Motion Pictures.

 

Quoted: "What did Hitchcock teach me? To be a puppet and not try to be creative."

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Quoted: "Fredric March had the reputation of being a ladies man. We made two pictures together, "Merrily We Go to Hell" (1932) and "Good Dame" (1934). But he never laid a hand on me, never made a pass at me! Freddie was happily married. He'd tease me by saying, 'Look at those boobs!' or 'Look at that toosh!'. But it was all in fun."

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Sidney in her Oscar nominated role as Mrs.Pritchett in "Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams" (1973)

 

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In the Spotlight: ROBERT WALKER

 

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The charming, boyish actor was born Robert Hudson Walker on October 13, 1918 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Zella and Horace Walker, he was the youngest of four sons.

He attended the San Diego Army and Navy Military Academy and developed an interest in acting which led to his maternal aunt to offer to pay for his enrollment at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City in 1937.

 

It was at the academy that Walker met fellow aspiring actress Phyllis Isley (better known as Jennifer Jones). After a brief courtship the two were married on January 2, 1939 and moved to Hollywood to find work in films.

Their prospects proved to be meager however and they soon returned to New York where Walker found work in radio and Phyllis gave birth to two sons in quick succession, actor Robert Walker, Jr., born April 15, 1940, and Michael Walker, born March 13, 1941.

Phyllis then returned to auditioning where her luck changed when she was discovered by producer David O. Selznick who changed her name to Jennifer Jones and groomed her for stardom.

During their initial meetings Selznick was highly attracted to Jones and they quietly began an affair. She eventually landed the plum role of Bernadette Soubirous in the Twentieth Century Fox production "The Song of Bernadette" (1943). Many speculate that her film success was the result of her affair with Selznick who managed every aspect of her life and furthered her career.

 

The couple returned to Hollywood and Selznick's connections helped Walker secure a contract with MGM where he started work on the war drama "Bataan" (1943). Walker's charming demeanor and boyish good looks caught on with audiences and he worked steadily playing "boy-next-door" roles in films such as "See Here, Private Hargrove" (1944) and "Her Highness and the Bellboy" with Hedy Lamarr (1945). He also appeared in Selznick's "Since You Went Away" (1944) in which he and his wife gave poignant performances as doomed young lovers. By that time Walker had found out about her affair with Selznick and the filming of loves scenes was torturous for the actor; Selznick was especially cruel by having him perform take after take of each love scene with Jones.

 

Walker and Jones were divorced after the end of filming and although he continued to work steadily in Hollywood, he was distraught by the divorce and prone to drinking and emotional outbursts. In 1946 he starred in "'Till the Clouds Roll By", where he played the lead as the song writer Jerome Kern in a role that required him to age from a young man to an old man. Walker starred as composer Johannes Brahms in "Song of Love" (1947), which co-starred Katharine Hepburn and Paul Henreid.

 

He subsequently suffered a nervous breakdown and spent time at the Menninger Clinic in 1949. Following his release from the Menninger Clinic, Walker was hired by director Alfred Hitchcock for "Strangers on a Train" (1951). His performance as the evil yet oddly sympathetic Bruno Anthony was highly lauded and considered to be his finest role.

His emotional problems largely behind him, and his career in an upswing following his latest acclaimed performance, he spent a lot of time with his sons, and was considering the possibility of remarrying. (He had married Barbara Ford the daughter of director John Ford in 1948 but the marriage was annulled six weeks later).

 

During his 15 year movie career, he made 24 films which included, "Madame Curie", "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo", "The Clock" with Judy Garland, "The Sailor Takes a Wife", "The Beginning or the End", "The Sea of Grass", "One Touch of Venus" with Ava Gadner, "Please Believe Me", "Vengeance Valley", etc.

 

While filming "My Son John" with Helen Hayes in 1951, Walker died suddenly. Suffering a severe panic attack in the early evening, he was administered an injection of sodium amytal under cloudy circumstances by two psychiatrists who had appeared at his home. Unused footage from "Strangers on a Train" in addition to a body double were used to complete "My Son John".

Walker was 32 years old and was buried at Washington Heights Memorial Park in Ogden, Utah.

 

The circumstances surrounding Walker's death have never been fully explained. Conflicting stories surfaced from those who were present the night he died.

 

The heartbroken actor has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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Great stuff Mongo, I haven't commented in a while. But that doesn't mean that I don't read your thread. I do.... always. So keep it going and Happy Holidays.

 

 

Bill (vallo)

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