Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
bansi4

"In the Spotlight"

Recommended Posts

Photobucket

Daddy Darro and daughter Darlene

 

Photobucket

Darro with wife Betty & daughter Darlene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

The Red Skelton Show with Darro as the 'Little Old Lady"

 

Message was edited by: mongo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Darro (lying down) with Cary Grant in "Operation Petticoat"

 

Photobucket

Darro on the set of "Operation Petticoat" (1959)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the Spotlight: JUDITH ANDERSON

 

Photobucket

 

The grand dame was born Frances Margaret Anderson-Anderson on February 10, 1897 in Adelaide, South Australia.

She attended Norwood High School, and began acting on stage at age 17 in Australia. In the company were some American actors who influenced Francee to try her luck in America. Francee went to California but was unsuccessful, so she tried New York, with equal lack of success.

 

After a period of poverty and illness, she found work with a Stock Company at the 14th Street Theatre in 1918-19. Twelve months later, she had changed her name to Judith and had her first triumph in a play co-starring Louis Calhern.

By the early 1930s she had established herself as one of the greatest theatre actresses of her era and she was a major star on Broadway throughout the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.

 

In 1937, she joined the Old Vic Company in London and played Lady Macbeth opposite Laurence Olivier and in 1941, she played Lady Macbeth again in New York opposite Maurice Evans.

 

Although she made her film bebut in the pre-code crime drama "Blood Money" in 1933, it was in Hitchcock's "Rebecca" in 1940 as the housekeeper Mrs. Danvers, who was required to mentally torment the young bride, the "second Mrs. de Winter" (Joan Fontaine), that brought her wide exposure to movie fans. She was considered one of the screen's most memorable and sexually ambiguous female villains and was nominated for an Academy Award in a supporting role.

Her striking, not conventionally attractive features were complemented with her powerful presence, mastery of timing and an effortless style.

 

In 1943, she played Olga in Chekhov's "Three Sisters", in a production which also featured Katharine Cornell, Ruth Gordon, Edmund Gwenn, Dennis King, Alexander Knox and Kirk Douglas in his Broadway debut. The production was so illustrious, it made it to the cover of Time.

 

Although her opportunities were limited to supporting character actress work she excelled in such films as "Lady Scarface", "Kings Row", Otto Preminger's "Laura" with Gene Tierney, Ren? Clair's "And Then There Were None" Ben Hecht's "Specter of the Rose", Jean Renoir's "Diary of a Chambermaid", "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers", "Pursued" with Robert Mitchum, "The Red House", and "The Furies" in which Stanwyck throws a pair of scissors in her face.

 

In 1947, she triumphed as "Medea" in a production by John Gielgud who also played Jason. She won the Tony Award for Best Actress for her performance.

 

She was made a British Dame in 1959.

 

In 1970 she realized a long held ambition to play the role of "Hamlet". She did this on a national tour of the United States and at New York's Carnegie Hall at the age of 73.

 

Anderson holds the unusual distinction of winning two separate Emmy Awards for playing the same role - Lady Macbeth - in two separate productions of "Macbeth".

 

Her stage and film work continued and by the 1950s she was also appearing in television productions. She played Herodias in "Salome", Memnet in Cecil B. de Mille's "The Ten Commandments", gave a memorable performance as Big Momma in the film of Tennessee Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof", Evil Stepmother in "Cinderfella' with Jerry Lewis, and Buffalo Cow Head in "A Man Called Horse".

 

Anderson also recorded many spoken word record albums for Caedmon Audio in the 1950s through the 1970s. She received a Grammy nomination for her work on the "Wuthering Heights" recording.

 

In her later years she played two more prominent roles in productions that took her as far away from her Shakespearean origins as possible. In 1984 she appeared in "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock" as the Vulcan High Priestess (at the age of 87), and the same year commenced a three-year stint as matriarch Minx Lockridge on the NBC serial "Santa Barbara". She had professed to be a fan, but after signing the contract she bitterly complained about her lack of screen time.

 

Anderson was married and divorced twice, first to Benjamin Harrison Lehmann (from 1937 to 1939) and second to Luther Greene (from 1946 to 1951). Neither marriage, both of which occurred after she turned 40, produced children, but she did serve as godmother for friends' children. Despite her marriages, Anderson was subject to speculation about her sexuality throughout her career. In his biography "Otto Preminger: The Man Who Would Be King" (2007), Foster Hirsch states matter-of-factly that Anderson was gay.

 

Anderson loved the city of Santa Barbara, California and spent the remainder of her life there, dying of pneumonia in 1992, aged 94. Cremated, she was survived by several nieces and nephews, both in America and Australia.

 

Guess what? Miss Anderson does not have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

Message was edited by: mongo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In regard to the info about J. Anderson in the 50s, I have a recording of a dramatic

"reading" of "John Brown's Body" by Stephen Vincent Benet.(rec. 4/7/1953)

"First performance of JB'sB was in New York on Feb. 14, l953. Hailed by critics

as "a piece of vivid theatre", "a stirring and impressive event", and "a new-old magic

restored to the theatre".

The production was directed by Charles Laughton.

The three actors were: Tyrone Power, Raymond Massey, & JUDITH ANDERSON.

 

I received the recording as a gift and I consider it one of my treasured possessions.

 

The actors voiced different parts. " J Anderson represented the troubled Southern

belle, Sally Dupre, the lovely girl of the wilderness Melora Vilas, and proud Southern

aristocrat, Mary Lou Wingate."

Obviously, these actors were chosen for their voice quality but also for their

acting ability.

I just wanted to share this because as soon as I saw J. Anderson's "spotlight",

I thought about this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Barger, thanks for sharing that with us.You are indeed fortunate to have the recording. Those were the days of great stars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Anderson in her Oscar nominated role as Mrs. Danvers in "Rebecca" with Joan Fontaine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Anderson in a dramatic scene from the 1940s.

Perhaps a member can tell us the name of the film it came from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Joe! I hope you don't mind me posting some Judith Anderson caps. If it's too much, just let me know.

 

The Strange Love of Martha Ivers

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers1.jpg

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers2.jpg

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers3.jpg

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers4.jpg

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers5.jpg

 

strangeloveofmarthaivers6.jpg

 

The Red House

 

redhouse4.jpg

 

redhouse1.jpg

 

redhouse2.jpg

 

redhouse3.jpg

 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

 

catonahottinroof1.jpg

 

catonahottinroof2.jpg

 

catonahottinroof3.jpg

 

catonahottinroof4.jpg

 

catonahottinroof5.jpg

 

catonahottinroof6.jpg

 

catonahottinroof7.jpg

 

catonahottinroof8.jpg

 

catonahottinroof9.jpg

 

Laura

 

laura1.jpg

 

laura2.jpg

 

laura3.jpg

 

laura4.jpg

 

laura5.jpg

 

laura6.jpg

 

 

Rebecca

 

rebecca1.jpg

 

rebecca2.jpg

 

rebecca3.jpg

 

rebecca4.jpg

 

rebecca5.jpg

 

rebecca6.jpg

 

rebecca7.jpg

 

rebecca8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frank, I appreciate the caps from Judith Anderson's finer films. Some are superior to the selections I had prepared to post. Thank you.

 

Fred, the selection of early Anderson shots are

terrific. Thanks.

I especially like the one where she is smiling...for a change:

 

Photobucket

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Anderson (second from right) during the war effort in Hollandia.

 

Message was edited by: mongo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Anderson in a publicity shot as Big Momma in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photobucket

Anderson as Buffalo Cow Head in "A Man Called Horse"

with Corinna Tsopei

 

Dame Judith Anderson: Well, now, you take "A Man Called Horse", which I didn't want to talk about because it was a disaster for me. I did not have my way about that at all.

I was not allowed my clean line of thought and feeling, the rhythm of Buffalo Cow Head.

So I can't have much feeling about Buffalo Cow Head.

Oh, and added to that, Richard Harris had my best scene taken out of the picture; he wouldn't let me shoot it.

I didn't even finish the picture, somebody else finished--but not much, just a gesture or something in the snow. But I've not seen it and I'm not going to see it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...