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Andy Hardy = white-bread drivel


PeterIbbetson
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Sorry if I sound a bit rude or condescending, but it's just my opinion.

 

Seriously, I really don't give a damn about the Andy Hardy series. To me, it's just white bread drivel that is one of the negative side effects of the post-code enforcement. I just don't like archaic morality or lifestyles, especially of small-town America. That's the same reason why I can't stand a lot of the popular music of the early 1950's - it strikes me as bland, lifeless and just plain white bread.

 

In addition to the Andy Hardy series, I have a similar opinion about "State Fair". Small towns in America with such clean cut young people set to (IMO) bland music just ain't my cup of tea at all. It's corny and reflects a very backwards, archaic, "Father Knows Best"-like view of society. Not as awful as the Lawrence Welk show, but still not the kind of thing I'd watch.

 

Anyone care to comment on this assessment?

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Your's is a clear sighted view, but these movies still fascinate me. Not as works of art, but as a reflection of a time that came before me. The story lines seem to be the yin to Hollywood's yang. I've only seen Love Finds Andy Hardy and one other (perhaps the first one), and spent the time waiting for Miss Garland to sing. The ideals in the film might not indicate how the times were, but how people wished it were. In the same way, it's interesting to view old films about the future. Metropolis, Things to Come, etc., don't shed light on how the future will unfold, but rather give us a clue to the values of the time they were made. I look forward to seeing the remainder of the Hardy films. Perhaps once I've "checked them off my list" I'll hold them with the same derision, but until then -- TCM, please give me more!

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I haven?t lived in a big city since I left L.A. in 1978. I don?t care to be in one again. I don?t like to see them or smell them or drive through them. I don?t like their traffic, or their gangs, their crimes, their sleazy dames, or their sordid joints and cheap dives where people try to drown their loneliness and despair with whiskey and dope. I don?t like movies about them or most of the trashy movies Hollywood is turning out now, which are mainly crappy re-makes of classic old films.

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I didn't mean to sound rude. I don't mean to be rude to anyone who lives in a big city. I just don't like big cities anymore. I liked them when I was younger and when they had less crime and fewer people. I like nice calm Andy Hardy type towns now, and nice polite people.

 

I thought L.A. was crowded when I left in '78, but I went back in the early '90s and I couldn't believe the vast increase in population since '78. Sunset Boulevard used to be a nice quiet and mostly empty street back in the '70s, but by the '90s it was like the 101 freeway during rush hour.

 

Dallas was a fairly nice little city back in '67, but by 2000 it was two or three times the '67 size and everyone was driving very fast.

 

In Phoenix, people drive on downtown surface streets at 55 mph. It's very difficult to pull out of a shopping mall when the street traffic is going at 55 mph.

 

The last time I was in New York, it was a madhouse.

 

I was in DC in '65 and it was a wonderful clean and peaceful city with a downtown area where people could do walking around at night. By 1991 it had turned into a giant slum with hundreds of bums sleeping and camping in downtown city parks.

 

By the 1990s, and more so now, downtown L.A. lookes like some of the slums of Mexico City, with people living in boxes on the streets.

 

The same with San Francisco today.

 

New Orleans is a city like the one in "Soylant Green." It was destroyed by a flood which should have been avoided, but with the present city government they didn't know what the heck to do. When I lived there in the '60s they had a good government, people who knew how to run a city, hurricane evacuation plans, lots of rescue boats and buses, emergency radio equipment, disaster command centers. For the past 20 years they've had a third-world government and now the city is destroyed.

 

Merida, Yucatan, in Mexico, and San Pedro Sula in Honduras, also San Jose, Costa Rica, are medium-large cities that are safer, cleaner, and filled with more polite people than I see in most American cities today. These cities are "Andy Hardy" type towns down in Latin America, and I'd rather live in them than in any American city today.

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