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Anymore Cavette interviews to be broadcast??


Stephen44
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Cavett's conversations with director George Cukor and a circa 1970 chat

with Miss Joan Crawford are still very much M.I.A.

 

As excerpts from the Crawford interview is often glimpsed in documentaries (most notably in "M.G.M.: When The Lion Roars") it would be interesting to view the entire program.

 

Is it true he also interviewed the legendary Lillian Gish?

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I'd frankly be interested in the Janis Joplin/Susan Sontag interviews, too, but they would have nothing to do with the movies??? Which is why I think we need, in addition to TCM, a station for just Good Old Reruns. Not "Sanford and Son" (puh-leez), but TV back when TV was still intelligent, informative, and illuminating...

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Lillian Gish appeared with Dick Cavett on March 6, 1970, along with surrealist Salvador Dal? and baseball legend Satchel Paige. This was the episode when Dal? appeared with an anteater on leash.

 

I know what you mean, Mr. Here, but have to admit that "back when TV was still intelligent, informative, and illuminating..." made me giggle. I'm afraid that the era of intelligent TV hasn't happened yet. Intelligence has always been the exception rather than the rule. My Mother the Car, Beverly Hillbillies, Gilligan's Island, the list goes on... ;)

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Actually, I was thinking "Firing Line" with William F. Buckley, National Geographic specials (before all the computerized/digital "special effects" that are now supposed to WOW us), and "Masterpiece Theater" (again, back when it was good; before everything looked and sounded like a Merchant-Ivory movie)... Oh, we watched our share of Bob Newhart, too (that was about as low as we went in my family), but I'd love to see some of that stuff again. Everything is relative... Even an old Art Linkletter episode would be a breath of fresh air at this point!!!!!!!!!

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I hear you Jack, and don't mean to hi-jack this thread but I value your opinion greatly and am interested in what you think of the Aaron Sorkin/ThomasSchlamme combination in writing on The West Wing and Studio 60, on the Sunset Strip. I wonder if I'm just an enthralled fan or what others think. Have you ever seen either program? I believe they are the most (if only), intelligent writers in TV today. I'd love to see a movie written by them, but would hate to lose them from television. They are the eye in the hurricane of garbage on TV today.

 

Anne

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I'm sorry to say that I haven't seen any of those shows, Mrs. L. I'm often not home during prime time, and when I am and the television is on, it's set to either TCM (or checking in on Tim Gunn and Heidi Klum ;) ). But I do remember the exceptional exceptions that Mr. Here notes. And I include Dick Cavett's show among television's intelligent past (see? I know how to get us back on topic. :) ).

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Jack calls you Mr. Here because that's the second part of your name, Jack is always the perfect gentleman and astute on etiquette.

 

Ohh for the discussions with kids. There was, is, and never will be anything funnier, and Linkletters faces during the interview were priceless.

 

I remember 'Henry VIII' and something called 'Her Majesty' (I think, refresh me please). Masterpiece Theater was on Channel 11 here in Chicago and my first husband used to rant and rave through the whole thing, and I lost my Sundays in exchange but they were worth it! 'Up the Down Staircase' was one of the last ones I saw, and although not as good, was enjoyable.

 

Jack: Waste an hour of tape and record it next Monday night, channel 5 at 9:00 Chi time, or watch an episode on the NBC site during the day. It's only about 45 minutes long. (Again, you amaze me, I can't believe you never watched any of The West Wing).

 

Anne

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I think all the ones they are playing so far are ones that are included in the recently released DVD boxed set.

 

I never get that about TCM. Oftentimes, they show things that are in a recently released boxed set - not just in this case, but in other cases as well. But personally, I think that if they want to bring in the viewers, they should show stuff that's NOT in the boxed set. Related items...but not ones that are actually IN the set.

 

But hey...what do I know? :P

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But I'm a girl...!!! : (

So it's MS. Here (but no prob)...

 

As for the boxed sets and the theory that these new movies are for the "bottom dollar," if anyone DOESN'T need more money, isn't it Ted Turner? Or did he sell TCM?? Or is there no such thing as "enough money" among the monied?????

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Supposedly to play them is to inspire the public to buy them. People buy what they've seen; so they show what's to be released on DVD to get people to buy them. I don't know if this works, but I believe it's the theory.

 

Apologies to Ms. Here! It's difficult to keep track of these androgynous handles, and I've failed miserably. Believe or not, even Mrs. L has been victim to my gender-confusion (and something tells me she's smiling right now). I invited everyone to fill out their profiles and give our colleagues some clues. :)

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I would have picked the Joan Crawford interview over Katie Hepburn. I loved the Hepburn interview but if I had to choose one I would have rather seen Bette Davis vs. Joan Crawford. Everyone loves a trainwreck. George Cukor also sounds better then some of the ones that were broadcast (Mel Brooks, Woody Allen). Although I didn't see all of the interviews I found the ones that I did see interesting in the unique details that were revealed about Hollywood and the individual lives of these people. Hopefully more will be shown.

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Laughing out loud is more like it, Jack :D

 

Brad:

 

Although I was never a Saturday Night Live fan, I realize 90% of the rest of the living audiences all over the world are, so it took me a few episodes to catch on. Studio 60 is a drama/comedy about the folks that put on a SNL-like Friday night program, which is a politically incorrect show, and the trials and tribulations the staff goes through to avoid lawsuits, and just generally irritating church groups, politicians, teenagers, the elderly and anybody else you can imagine. You don't actually see the show they put on, just snippets to clarify problems being discussed between the producer, actors, and writing staff. It's written by the writers of The West Wing, the dialogue is quick and witty, some of the situations are crazy but written in such a way as you're not saying "No, Stupid" as in practically any other show on TV, including reality gunk, and the POTUS's various speeches. The stars are Bradley Whitford (TWW) and Mathew Perry of Friends.

 

I wait anxiously each week for it. I wish they would start a message board for it.

 

Anne

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As for the boxed sets and the theory that these new movies are for the "bottom dollar," if anyone DOESN'T need more money, isn't it Ted Turner? Or did he sell TCM?? >>

 

Ms. Here,

 

Yes, in fact, Ted did sell the TCM library (and I believe TCM itself but am not sure about that one). When he did the merger with Time-Warner a few years back, the TCM library (and possibly the channel) were part of that merge. The film library is now under the care of Warner Brothers.

 

For the first time in decades, the Warner film library has been reunite. The Warner/TCM library consists of All Warner Bros films, All RKO films and MGM films until 1986.

 

This makes it an incredibly large, if not the largest, studio film library with thousands and thousands of titles.

 

Does anyone have any idea how many films are in this library?

 

Anyways, its sheer size makes it impossible for all the titles to be available on a digital format that TCM can run, much less DVD.

 

Film preservation and restoration is a costly, time and labor intensive job. A studio can spend years restoring one feature. Disney spent years restoring Bambi. Warner Bros is currently trying to find the lost footage from "The Sea Wolf" before releasing it on DVD or releasing it for screening.

 

We have to remember that the studios can make more money selling box sets of old and new television shows, then they can selling DVDs or DVD box sets of classic films.

 

As much as we hate to admit it around here, we are a niche market.

 

One of the reasons Paramount does not release many of their classic films (well, the ones they haven't sold to Universal) on DVD (which means they likely aren't on a digital format either) is because they always fall back on the excuse that the DVDs did so bad selling that there is not enough market demand for their classic films. When they do release some of their classic films it is usually a bare bones, no extras disc and the film usually has not been restored.

 

Universal is only recently beginning to shine a light into their vaults and releasing some of their classic films (usually the ones they acquired from Paramount). But they are now owned by GE, so they take a very slow, bottom line approach to their releases.

 

Fox, for some reason, is mainly interested in restoring their classic Rogers and Hammerstein musicals, then their other musicals and then their classic films. It does help that they own their library and have their own movie channel as an outlet for the DVDs.

 

Warner Bros is the top of the pyramid when it comes to film restoration, preservation and moving their library to a digital format. Unfortunately, as noted above, the library is huge and because they tend to do their jobs well, it takes time.

 

But as I have noted here before, just because a film once existed is no guarantee that the film exists today or that the elements (both picture and sound) are in any shape to be transferred. And then there are rights issues.

 

But that's another post.

 

Message was edited by:

lzcutter

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I'm sure ALL the Cavette interviews are available for viewing however, >>

 

Leo,

 

Actually, no they aren't. There was an article last summer about the boxed sets of the Cavette being released and the upcoming shows on TCM.

 

There are still many interviews that need to be preserved, restored and transferred.

 

Some are tied up in rights issues.

 

So, maybe someday they will all be available but not right now.

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Ms. Cutter said:

 

Film preservation and restoration is a costly, time and labor intensive job. A studio can spend years restoring one feature. ... One of the reasons Paramount does not release many of their classic films (well, the ones they haven't sold to Universal) on DVD (which means they likely aren't on a digital format either) is because they always fall back on the excuse that the DVDs did so bad selling that there is not enough market demand for their classic films. When they do release some of their classic films it is usually a bare bones, no extras disc and the film usually has not been restored.

 

Very interesting. I did not know any of this. I am very curious as to whether the cost of bringing old movies to market could be reduced by creating some kind of pay-per-download database, either through cable/satelite or on the internet? Like iTunes, except for movies?

 

But maybe this is a question for a different thread. This one seems to have veered dramatically off topic. :D

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