Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Last black-and-white MGM musical?


Cinemascope
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's true that Jailhouse Rock was B/W, but I should have been more specific and said that I was referring to the point in time when MGM stopped routinely making all (or most) musicals in B/W -- started wondering while watching 1944's Meet the People, which was in B/W even though Lucille Ball had previously been in a Technicolor MGM musical DuBarry was a Lady (1943).

 

I guess from the second half of the 40's on, almost all MGM musicals were in glorious Technicolor... so I guess it would be more accurate to ask, which was the last B/W MGM musical in the 40's? =)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Musicals were split between the "prestige" pictures and the "run-of-the-mill", so a number of black and white continued to be made. [Now it seems the "prestige" pictures -- those that want to be set apart -- are in black and white (e.g., The Good German, Good Night and Good Luck).] But you're correct Mr. Scope, color musicals certainly became more prevalent as the 1940's dissipated. 1947 still saw a number of b/w MGM musicals. At least I thought of Living in a Big Way and It Happened in Brooklyn right off the bat...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good question. "Jailhouse Rock" (1957) is probably correct, or how about "High School Confidential" (1958)?

 

As for the pre-rock 'n' roll era, could the answer be: "Love is Better Than Ever" (1952) w/ Elizabeth Taylor? I'm not sure it was truly a musical. More likely it was just a romance/comedy that happened to have the musical theater as its setting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you ^.^

 

I can think of no single genre that has brought as much joy to my moviewatching as the ol' MGM musicals. Generally I use that term to mean more specifically the Arthur Freed musicals, although I'd like to know as much about all the musicals ever made by MGM before, well, the end of the old studio system.

 

Sometimes it's a bit sad to be able to watch a clip from a musical on DVD because it's included in the That's Entertainment! trilogy, even when the film itself is not on DVD as of yet.

 

But I keep hoping someday I'll be *the* authority on all MGM musicals. =D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The trio of That's Entertainment! features is my standard too. I've been trying to see every musical that was featured in them, but it's not easy. I finally checked off Small Town Girl (the number where Ann Miller dances amongst the disembodied, instrument-playing arms and hands) and Two Weeks of Love ("Abba Dabba Honeymoon") this past year. (Thanks TCM!). Still haven't seen Suzy, Reckless Toast of New Orleans and Pagan Love Song. (Hint, hint, TCM!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have hardcover copy of The MGM Story, which lists every MGM movie ever made through the 1970s. If you want to be an expert in them, that's a good place to start. I think paperback copies are available on Amazon, though it's OOP and you'd have to use an Amazon seller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just want to thank you all for your suggestions. And just to further clarify my original question (since I did such a bad job of being more specific), I'd just add that, the average movie goer who liked MGM musicals in the 30's and 40's would have been aware that nearly all MGM musicals in the 30's had been in B/W, and that by the second half of the 40's, they were nearly all in Technicolor. So, to the movie fan at that time, which movie might have seemed like the "turning point" of this transition? The point at which it became pretty clear that MGM musicals were now as a rule going to be in Technicolor?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...