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tiny film moments


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Two from "Born Yesterday" -

 

The elegant and sophisticated-looking Bille Dawn's first utterance - the perfect "Whaaaaat?" This woman is definitely not a book to be judged by its cover.

 

And the entire Gin game sequence. The two leads are impeccable. I don't know which one to watch anymore. I used to watch Holliday but Crawford is equally amazing in his frustration and exhasperation. Thankfully this movie isn't in widescreen.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

 

ps - In Gin Rummy, what exactly is 'schneider' when it come to laying down or to scoring? It was never part of the (simple) rules I learned.

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It's sweet because it is so innocent. It's Harpo doing what any kid would do. When all else fails have a lollipop. (or in my case M & Ms)

 

One of my favorite Marx Brothers moments is in "Animal Crackers" when Groucho is presenting a decorative chest to Margraet Dumont. At first he points to the furniture and says "This magnificent chest.." changes his mind, points to M. Dumont and says "this magnificent chest..." then goes back to the furniture. If you blink you miss it.

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> I always get a thrill while watching Terry Gilliam's

> Brazil, during the action scene that takes

> place in the lobby of the Information Retrieval. As

> storm troopers march on the stairs, a janitor is shot

> and his vacuum cleaner rolls down the steps. I'm

> always struck with a feeling of d?j? vu, and then I

> realize the scene is a reenactment of Sergei

> Eisenstein's silent masterpiece

> Бронено

> 1089;ец

> Потёмкиl

> 5; ("Battleship Potemkin").

 

 

I have another Terry Gilliam moment: the scene in "The Fisher King" where Robin Williams waits in Grand Central Station for a glimpse of the girl he's in love with (Amanda Plummer). As she approaches in the crowded, noisy station, beautiful music swells up, the noises ebb away. Suddenly, everyone in the station takes a partner and begins waltzing to the lovely music. They dance for a few seconds as Plummer passes the place where Williams is standing. As she moves away, the music dies down, the dancers release their partners, and they all resume going about their business as the noise of the station comes back.

 

It's a lovely scene, a metaphor for what Williams' character is feeling when he sees his beloved, and I find it one of the most romantic scenes in film.

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This is really a great thread...too bad my "memory" isn't working today. :)

I could go on and on about "tiny film moments" from my two favorites, "To Kill A Mockingbird" and "The Wizard Of Oz," but I won't...

One that does come to mind is from "Sunset Boulevard-"when Gloria Swanson leads William Holden into her bedroom-mistaking his identity-to show him where the body is laid out...He runs the gamut with his facial expressions as the cover is pulled back...This scene really lets us know that we're in for more "Grand Guignol" than we anticipated...

 

Another favorite is from a TV movie-"The Homecoming." When Patricia Neal's husband finally comes home on Christmas Eve, her body language and facial expression express complete relief and joy and exhaustion from all that worrying...we've all been there...Patricia Neal's performance throughout is perfection.

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movieman1957 said:

 

One of my favorite Marx Brothers moments is in "Animal Crackers" when Groucho is presenting a decorative chest to Margraet Dumont. At first he points to the furniture and says "This magnificent chest.." changes his mind, points to M. Dumont and says "this magnificent chest..." then goes back to the furniture. If you blink you miss it.

 

In At the Circus, when Groucho is trying to get the wallet from the lady ceiling walker just as she puts it into her bra... "This is when I could really use the long arm of the law." I have to watch those movies over and over to catch all of Groucho's jokes... He can go through lines like no one I have ever seen!

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The Marx Brothers did stage versions of the MGM films to time the laughs. That was a common complaint of some of the early films in that people were laughing so that they completely missed the next line.

 

Another Groucho moment:

 

He and Margaret Dumont walking up a ramp to get on a ship in "A Night At The Opera". He is carrying a suitcase or two.

 

Dumont: Do you have everything?

Groucho: Haven't had any complaints yet.

 

Cut to next scene.

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Also, I love the moment in The Lady Eve when Henry Fonda condescendingly tells Barbara Stanwyck (who, unbeknownst to Fonda, is a card shark) that she is good at poker. With phony innocence she says, do you really think so? He says yes and tells her she has "a nose for it." She then says, "Glad you like it." It's cute because she's facing him in profile, allowing the audience to see Stanwyck's real-life big ****.

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jdb1 said: "the scene in "The Fisher King" where Robin Williams waits in Grand Central Station for a glimpse of the girl he's in love with (Amanda Plummer). As she approaches in the crowded, noisy station, beautiful music swells up, the noises ebb away. Suddenly, everyone in the station takes a partner and begins waltzing to the lovely music. They dance for a few seconds as Plummer passes the place where Williams is standing. As she moves away, the music dies down, the dancers release their partners, and they all resume going about their business as the noise of the station comes back."

 

Now that's a breathtaking moment. Thank you for reminding us!

 

benwhowell said: "I could go on and on about "tiny film moments" from my two favorites, "To Kill A Mockingbird" and "The Wizard Of Oz," but I won't..."

 

Then I will. I've already mentioned my favorite To Kill a Mockingbird moment. A favorite Wizard of Oz moment is after the first abrupt, flammable exit of the Wicked Witch of the West. As the murky red smoke of her "contrail" dissipates, Glinda swats at the vapor and sputters "Whew! What a smell of sulphur!". It's a funny, rude throwaway line, but seems so spontaneous, I always wonder if it were an ad lib.

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Hey drdoolittle! :)

 

My favorite Marx Brothers movie is A Night At The Opera, I love Chico's piano sequence the best in that one... Yours? Did you by chance catch the Marx category on Jeopardy! tonight? I love when that show has any classic film questions.

 

I wish I could have seen your daughter! :) I've never seen that I Love Lucy but I would love to...

 

"You Tube" Harpo Marx and I believe you will find one of the clips where he does speak. On a show I believe... But I'm not too familiar.

 

bhf1940

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Last scene of Casablanca. That flicker that passes over Claude Raines' face and you see his mind change in that instant. You know he's letting Rick off just before he says "Round up the usual suspects."

 

And another, from the absolutely brutal "The Pawnbroker," when Rodriguez, trying to connect with Mr. Naserman, just gives up. The little friendly light in his eyes just dies as he realizes that Naserman is wholly indifferent. It rips you up, that movie, but it's brilliant and full of wonderful performances.

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"Marty", my favorite movie. How about when Marty takes Clara back to his mother's house and tries to kiss her? The scene where she explains that he startled her and that she likes him and wants to see him again while Marty tries to hold back his tears.

 

How about "Dead End" when Drina, played by Sylvia Sidney tells Joel McCrae about the (imaginary) rich man she met on the subway always breaks my heart.

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One of my favorites small moments comes from 1986's "Little Shop Of Horrors". Mr. Mushnik (Vincent Gardenia) is listening to Seymour Krelborn (Rick Moranis) talk about Audrey II on the radio. He gets cut off as Audrey (Ellen Greene) enters the shop. She tries to explain why she's late.

 

Audrey: "Sorry I'm late".

 

Mr. Mushnik: "Were you tied up?"

 

Audrey: "No. Just handcuffed a little."

 

When we see her boyfriend Orin Scrivello, DDS (Steve Martin) later in the movie, we get the meaning of that earlier exchange. I thought that was funny.

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Great thread....just a few that pop into mind....

 

Rear Window - When Thelma Ritter's character talks about how she thinks the murderer must have cut up the body of his wife while James Stewart is trying to eat breakfast.... she says "of course, the bathtub, the only way to clean up all the blood." or something like that and Stewart chokes on his coffee.

 

The Little Foxes - When Regina's husband is struggling up the stairs for his medicine and there is a close up of Bette Davis listening to him struggle and she doesn't blink the entire sequence... it is GREAT acting. Shows how incredible Davis was that the dying scene of another actor takes place in the background as her face commands the entire screen. God I miss that woman!

 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - in the beginning when Maggie the Cat is changing her stockings and talking about the no-neck monsters you can see a moment of Brick smiling in agreement as she explains just how horrible those kids are. Then a couple moments later they show Taylor's legs as she is adjusting her stockings in front of Brick, an obviously feminine flirtation that she uses to analyze her husbands interests. Also, at the end of the film when Maggie runs up the stairs after Brick calls after her, it is so funny to me how she ignores Sister Woman falling apart on the stairs... so great.

 

GWTW - Favorite moment is when Scarlett shows up in the red velvet dress to Melanie's house. The camera goes from a long shot of her amazing body swathed in red and travels to a close up with the highest arched eyebrow showing Scarlett's fear and strength all in one moment... an iconic image in the film.

 

So many more......

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"How about 'Dead End' when Drina, played by Sylvia Sidney tells Joel McCrae about the (imaginary) rich man she met on the subway always breaks my heart."

 

This movie is a gem. For me, the moment in this film is when Mrs. Martin (Marjorie Main) sees her son (Humphrey Bogart). She is worn and angry. Quite a juxtaposition with so many of the lighthearted roles Ms. Main often played. TCM has been devoting their "What a Character" spot to Ms. Main lately, and I'm always sorry they don't include this scene -- one of the best of her career. It's haunting!

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I can't think of the name of the movie (all the grey matter is turning to grey hair).But Bette Davis is sitting in a chair doing her sewing while giggolo Montogermy Clift is pounding on her door.She tells the maid she'll close up but ignores him with a what goes around comes around look.

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> I can't think of the name of the movie (all the grey

> matter is turning to grey hair).But Bette Davis is

> sitting in a chair doing her sewing while giggolo

> Montogermy Clift is pounding on her door.She tells

> the maid she'll close up but ignores him with a what

> goes around comes around look.

 

WILLKANE are you thinking of the Heiress? It was made with Clift and Olivia De Haviland and boy that was good wasn't it? However it is possible that you could be right I mean Davis and Clift could have made a movie like the one you describe-since my movie knowledge is not vast.

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One of my favorite scenes in Casablanca is when the German soldiers are singing their song and Paul Henreid asks the band to play the French anthem. The looks on the peoples faces and the tears in the one girls eyes is touching and so patriotic.

 

Anne

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