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How many buy movies?


otterhere
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Just curious about this; I'm probably as big a film buff as you'll find anywhere, but very seldom have I felt compelled to buy a VHS or DVD copy of something (the exceptions are such things as documentaries or foreign films that are seldom or never shown, such as "Seven Up" and "Scenes From a Marriage"; I'm glad I also bought copies of "Bridgeshead Revisted" and even the American Ballet Theatre's version of "The Nutcracker," since these have never again been seen on TV...

 

But to buy a copy of a movie that one can rent or borrow from the library or that is shown regularly on TV has never interested me in the least; do people really watch copies of their own tapes over and over; enough to justify the cost of them?

 

I see too many DVDs being sold in yard sales with the disclaimer, "watched just once"...

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I buy only titles I really like to watch more than once (and there are a lot of those) because there are times when I'm really in "the mood" to see a certain film and it's not on television. Also, there have been many times that "nothing" is on any of the channels and I like to have the option to just put in my favorite dvd instead. One other, lesser reason is that I'd like to have a library to share with my family and friends, now, and in the future.

 

Classic television shows fall into this category, too, because they are virtually never shown at all (or at odd times of day).

 

Miss G

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I do get you otterhere. My tapes are mainly for spring and winter when the dish goes out, even with the TV picture gone, you can still watch a DVD or tape. I also watch them on days like today or last night when TCM isn't showing anything I like. I watched Gidget last time it was on for 'old times sake' but when it was on this past week, I watched a tape instead that filled the time span. I did buy the Cinderella DVD last year when it was re-released because I always loved it, but I refuse to buy DVD's new. Sometimes I'll put Cinderella on for my granddaughter to make sure she doesn't go channel surfing and finds South Park or The Simpsons again. When I'm cleaning house I'll put in a R&H tape like Oklahoma or Carousel so when I have to rest (about every 20 minutes) I can watch for a few minutes, nothing to see when you play a CD.

 

I don't get these people on the 'DVD's released yet' threads. Golly, all they have to do is wait a while and the DVD will be done. I guess I understand the rare ones, but if they know so much about rare movies, what time do they have to actually watch? Why bother burning to DVD? I have 20 year old tapes I still play, when I'm gone my kids will throw them all out so who cares if it's on tape or DVD?

 

Anne

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> I see too many DVDs being sold in yard sales with the

> disclaimer, "watched just once"...

 

I had to laugh when I read that. I have friends who have almost bookcases of DVDs that they've only watched one time, but they just had to get them the second they were released. Now they collect dust. That's something I just don't get, why buy it if you're only going to watch it once, just so you can say you have it?

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> That's something I just don't get, why buy it if

> you're only going to watch it once, just so you can

> say you have it?

 

Well that's why I do it. I buy a LOT of DVDs, and before that I bought a lot of VHS tapes. I do watch most of them more than once though.

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I remember once (back in the mid 1980's) saying a person would be stupid buying a movie for his VCR. How many times can you watch a movie? I now have a collection of about 900 titles all cataloged, over 2 thirds of which are classics. And yes some I never tire of, and I can watch over and over, and others (the very rare titles) I collected just to own it. Some of those were only available from collectors.

 

I started with VHS tapes and now all but a few have been replaced by DVDs About half purchased, the others recorded.

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If I were going to rent this would I watch it enough times that it's cheaper to buy it? If it's yes than I'll buy it. It does make it easier when they are $9.99. What I don't get are people who will buy a DVD (at $20) and then buy the "Special Edition" of it later (at $40.) Those special features would have to be pretty special. Besides, I have a budget.

 

I'll confess that I have a DVD recorder and have had fun using it. Stuff I wouldn't buy I'll record. That won't bother me if it's a rare viewing.

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> What I don't get are people who will buy a DVD

> (at $20) and then buy the "Special Edition" of it

> later (at $40.) Those special features would have to

> be pretty special. Besides, I have a budget.

 

The only times I'll fall for that is if they make changes to the movie itself, like an extended edition, or if the original transfer was horrible (see Kurosawa's "Ran"). I won't do it for additional features, since I almost never watch them anyway.

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Actually, I buy a lot. Not much in the way of newer films, unless it really knocked me out in the theatre, but I have a lot of classics. I am a bit of a sucker for Warners' box sets when they do extra features in them and if it is a star I like. I am not sure how many studio-issued DVDs I have, but I would estimate somewhere between 100-250. I am at a point right now where I don't have time to see all that I have. I also burn a lot of TCM films onto DVD for myself, so that adds a few hundred more. I am at a point right now where I don't have time to see all that I have.

 

I guess we are both movie watchers, you and I, but the difference is I am also a movie collector (ones I like, that is, as opposed to just everything that is out there).

 

Your post could also be the same thing as regards to books. Some will just get a book from the library and read it, then return it, but some I like to have, even if I don't read it often (or possibly ever again). I know it is there if I do want to.

 

Generally, I am content if I have burned a TV showing of a film onto DVD, but sometimes I will buy a studio DVD if I really like it and want the best print there is.

 

I guess I fall under the heading of "collector."

 

As to buying a "special edition" when I already have it before, generally I won't. An exception might be if I find it at an incredibly cheap price, but even then it would have to have enough new in it that I would want. I already have the first "Ultimate Superman Collection", which was the four movies issued several years together in a box set, but I happily shelled out the money for the new 14 DVD set. I do get ticked that "Ultimate" means nothing and there will probably be revisions to it later. I won't pick up the repackaged version of the new King Kong just because it has more footage. This one strikes me as a studio scam to get more money for the same thing. Unfortunately, that now has become policy it seems for video issuers. The new James bond sets they are issuing will probably be available in one big set when the new theatre film goes to video.

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Hmmmm; not sure the "book" analogy really works... A book collector generally collects books that are valuable (first editions, signed copies, etc.), but a DVD is generally a DVD is a DVD??? Also, I'm frugal to a fault (although I actually think it's a virtue) and almost NEVER buy books (always borrow from the library; what they don't have, they can borrow from other libraries across the nation in a matter of days; I save my money for other things); however, there are exceptions, and those are "reference books" that I refer to often and like to have on hand (such as dictionaries, writing guides, medical symptom checkers, birdwatching guides, etc.). However, I can see where one would open up a home movie rental shop???

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Otter,

 

I actually think filmlover's book analogy is quite apt. Not all book collectors are interested in first editions or autographed copies.

 

I didn't start out a book collector but, like many here I have amassed quite a collection of books that are now out of print because I bought them when they were first printed. I grew up in a household where reading was important and books have been a part of my life from when I was small. I love books almost as much as I love movies and I will buy hardbacks and paperbacks of authors and non-fiction subjects that interest me.

 

I like knowing the books are there if I need to look up something or if I want to reread them.

My collection is likely only really valuable to me but that's okay. We have two large bookcases filled and another two dozen boxes of books waiting for the day we can afford and have the room for more book shelves.

 

I have a hard time getting rid of books but on those rare occasions they go to the local library for their yearly fundraising sales.

 

I guess it is different strokes for different folks. Given a choice between spending extra money on a good book or good classic film DVD and doing something else of the same value, I'm likely to choose the book or DVD.

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I buy, but only if there's supplemental material. And yes, I watch/listen repeatedly. I say "listen" because I enjoy the audio commentary on many disks. Some I buy because of the short subject that's included. But if the disk includes only the movie, I won't buy it. Chances are I can see it on the big screen in one of the local rep. houses; and I prefer that.

 

There are a few exceptions. For instance, I bought Detour, even though it had no extras...

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For me, it's like having money in the bank. I've got hundreds of films on DVD, VHS, and even beta tapes. Whenever there's nothing on tv or I'm just in the mood to see a certain film or actor, I can just go to the "vault" and get out one of my favorites. Plus, it's a great way to share wonderful movies with friends and relatives.

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otterhere, I can see you could not be called a collector. You could be called a fan - or a buff (preferred by some since "fan" is supposed to be short for "fanatic") - but not a collector because it really is something you would enjoy doing, and it would require spending to get things. At those times, while cash is nice to have, the item itself is of more value to the collector. But don't think I mean that the item has a street value; it has a sentimental value.

 

I think one gets into collecting very young. And one's interest just goes through different kinds of collections as you mature. However, I still have some Superman comics from the 1960s from when I was a child that I liked back then, and I can still get a warm remembrance of what those days were like by just glancing at them.

 

However, I can see where one would open up a home movie rental shop???

 

No, that would be a business. Certainly, one could open up a shop like that out of pleasure of movies, but it is still a business. You are talking money, finances. Nickels and dimes.

 

Collecting is different and may not be understandable to someone who has never been bitten by the bug. And lzcutter is right in that a book collector doesn't necessarily collect books that are valuable. Book collectors, or any collectors, collect something because it makes them feel good, not because it is valuable (though some may get pleasure out of owning something valuable - but that is more like a speculator than a collector). I like Modesty Blaise novels by Peter O'Donnell. My pleasure comes in reading them. I don't go out looking for first editions of O'Donnell's. I am just as happy to have a worn paperback because it is the story I want to read. And I will keep them because I like to reread them once in a while. I have a lot of books that I care about their condition, but my small stack of Modesty Blaise paperbacks sit on the shelf happily knowing they will be picked up and read again. What was it someone once said, that a book you like is like an old friend, ready to make you feel good any time.

 

And maybe you are a collector, since in a way by being frugal, it's just you are "collecting" money and that is what probably makes you feel good. I don't mean anything bad by that. We just all have things that we like to have, even if it is money.

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I do, but only if it's something I really want to see and that's not going to be playing on cable any time soon. TiVo is great! If there is a title I want to see I can enter it into my TiVo list, select "record automatically" and wait. It usually shows up eventually. If it doesn't, I may buy it if it is available.

 

It is not very important to me to own movies. I have so much clutter already. I am thinking about joining Netflix but haven't done so yet.

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Come to think of it, I also buy DVDs for the special features, especially audio commentary. I enjoy the feeling that I'm watching it with one of the actors or the director, or with the intelligent film critics and scholars distributors like Criterion sometimes use. For example, I love the film scholar's commentary to The Lady Eve (Criterion).

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I buy alot of DVDs.

 

I think in my commercially released collection, I have over 900 titles (and that is counting boxed sets of films and TV shows as 1 title for the whole boxed set)...and in my stuff-burned-from TCM collection maybe another 500 or so films.

 

But the 900 in commercial releases is not all classic film stuff. I love scifi TV and film as well, and so I would estimate that my commercially released collection is about:

 

39% Scifi - mainly TV, but also scifi films

33% Classic Film

15% TV series - non-scifi

10% 'Modern' movies

3% Music and documentaries

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Occasionally the DVDs actually do turn out to be valuable. I bought four sets of Mystery Science Theater Vol. 10 last week because it was recalled (due to rights issues with one of the films) and is now worth a lot more than face value. I bought one for me, one as a gift, and I'm selling the other two on eBay.

 

I also have the Image DVD of 47 Ronin, which is now selling for around $100. I actually plan to sell that one as well.

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Personally I seldom buy dvds (and never vhs). If I do, it could only be for three reasons: I love the movie enough to want to see it in its best form... I want some special feature... Or I have heard something about the movie and can't wait to see it on tv.

 

As for watching movies over and over, I consider alot of movies like good music cds... I like having them on hand to watch when I want to watch them. Hardly do I enjoy watching a movie again as it plays on tv. Only when I settle down, get a snack, and can devote full attention. That's why I think owning movies on dvd is invaluable.

And DVDs can be very expensive. Just in my collection right now I have thousands of dollars in movies that I could never afford to buy on dvd... I can't say enough for dvd-rs. So much fun to categorize them and show them to family!

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I just did a count and I am afraid I was off by a tiny amount when I guessed I have about 100-250 studio-issued DVDs. My actual count is 643.

 

And as far as films I have burned onto DVD from TV, again I was slightly off when I estimated "a few hundred more." The actual count of movies burned to DVD is 1,351.

 

So I guess I am not just a movie fan; I'm a real movie fan.

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"I just did a count and I am afraid I was off by a tiny amount when I guessed I have about 100-250 studio-issued DVDs. My actual count is 643. And as far as films I have burned onto DVD from TV, again I was slightly off when I estimated 'a few hundred more.' The actual count of movies burned to DVD is 1,351."

 

Oh my! Do you have them catalogued? Especially those you've burned yourself. How do you keep track, and/or remember what you have? I have over 300 studio-issued DVD's, and really need to start a catalogue; if only to keep track of the short subjects. Just hearing that you have thousands makes my heart quicken. I'd like to peruse those shelves...

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The studio-issued films I don't have a list of, just have them sitting on my shelves aphabetically. (I didn't include in that number the 50 DVDs in a pack things since they are of only fair quality, generally.)

 

As far as burned DVDs, those I have a listed on an Excel-type program aphabetically in order to keep track that I don't duplicate anything.

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Filmlover, now that's interesting... Perhaps I AM a collector of money... Of course that makes me sound like Scrooge or Silas Marner, but - now that I think about it - I really get the same thrill from seeing my savings account grow that others seem to get from purchasing the latest gadget or acquiring another item for a collection??? Naturally, money isn't an end in itself; I'm currently saving for a second investment property, and the ultimate goal is a beach house; I also enjoy saving money "here" (borrowing books and tapes from the library, shopping Goodwill, hiking v. attending expensive events) to spend it "there" (vacations, recreation, real estate). Hmm. Anyway, we skinflints say, "Thank you, TCM!!!"

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