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laffite

Classical Music

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Don't everyone post at once, now. This thread of course will get lots and lots and lots and lots of hits, but we don't want to glut the bandwidth, now, do we? (please, no responses saying 'no, we don't'.)

 

As we all know, unless one is hopelessly averse, that folks generally like CM to varying degrees. Those who are not necessarily ebullient about it may still have a perennial favorite they would like to share. Others who would rather attend a rock concert still may like CM to a degree and may have more selections at their beck. And then there those who are maniacal about it but I don't know who they are. Any closet maniacs out there?

 

If you of the averse (see above) and who regard CM with unbridled HATE I would respectfully request that you refrain from coming over here for the purpose of duck shooting. And that means those (who know who they are :-p who like to use cryptic little messages that consist of single letters separated by forward slashes, which I like to call The Attack of the Millennials, though they can be used by later generations as well, ahem!)

 

Now that the preamble is over I think it only fitting to debut this thread with a sprightly overture. Here is one of the most sprightliest:

 

 

 

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I'm not the most knowledgeable person when it comes to classical, but I've always liked this piece.

 

 

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Nice one.

 

I don't remember ever hearing that. Schubert penned a plethora of chamber music, some of them heard more often than others, of course.

 

Thanks for breaking the ice.

 

:)

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Some thirty years ago, I was heavily into chess. Each evening before dinner, I would sit with my chess set and cram for several hours with several books written by masters of the game. I would also chain smoke and enjoy more than a few cold beers. I did this each evening for almost a year with a special radio set to a local classical station which seemed perfect for the task.

 

I can not tell you the name of a single piece of music I heard in that time, but I enjoyed ninety-nine percent of what I heard.

 

When I began to teach myself piano, classical seemed the natural place to start.

I picked Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor

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Some thirty years ago, I was heavily into chess. Each evening before dinner, I would sit with my chess set and cram for several hours with several books written by masters of the game. I would also chain smoke and enjoy more than a few cold beers. I did this each evening for almost a year with a special radio set to a local classical station which seemed perfect for the task.

 

I can not tell you the name of a single piece of music I heard in that time, but I enjoyed ninety-nine percent of what I heard.

 

When I began to teach myself piano, classical seemed the natural place to start.

I picked Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor

 

Heavens, Kid, that's certainly an ambitious piece to start on. Obviously a transcription but nonetheless very difficult. I have two piano versions on the pod of the Ninth transcribed for piano, one for two pianos, and the other a solo piano. Not easy. Impressive to say the least.

 

No Chopsticks, eh?

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Heavens, Kid, that's certainly an ambitious piece to start on. Obviously a transcription but nonetheless very difficult. I have two piano versions on the pod of the Ninth transcribed for piano, one for two pianos, and the other a solo piano. Not easy. Impressive to say the least.

 

No Chopsticks, eh?

 

No Chopsticks

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[At the first performance] The second movement, Allegretto, was the most popular movement and had to be encored. The instant popularity of the Allegretto resulted in its frequent performance separate from the complete symphony. Wikipedia

 

It also plays like a military march and, indeed, is symbolic of military conquest and Patriotism.

 

I read how they used it in the film, played during a disaster scene. Yup, that would work. Nice thing that music is so subjective, it can be used in a way completely different from what the composer might have intended.

 

Good idea, Ham, the way in which classics are used in movies, a nice point of departure for ideas here.

 

Thanks

 

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Some thirty years ago, I was heavily into chess. Each evening before dinner, I would sit with my chess set and cram for several hours with several books written by masters of the game. I would also chain smoke and enjoy more than a few cold beers. I did this each evening for almost a year with a special radio set to a local classical station which seemed perfect for the task.

 

I can not tell you the name of a single piece of music I heard in that time, but I enjoyed ninety-nine percent of what I heard.

 

When I began to teach myself piano, classical seemed the natural place to start.

I picked Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor

 

Heavens, Kid, that's certainly an ambitious piece to start on. Obviously a transcription but nonetheless very difficult. I have two piano versions on the pod of the Ninth transcribed for piano, one for two pianos, and the other a solo piano. Not easy. Impressive to say the least.

 

No Chopsticks, eh?

 

Yeah Kid, laffite has a good point here.

 

How about instead of tackling that Ludwig piece as your very first venture tinklin' the ol' ivories, you maybe start with THIS little number here and which seems easy enough to pick up...AND which just happens to be a short section from one of my favorite classical pieces...Dvorak's Symphony No.9 "From the New World"...

 

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Ham, re Immortal Beloved

 

I watched the clip all the way through. I had thought to have seen this and remember only vaguely what was shown. The story goes---if true, who knows---that Beethoven actually conducted the premiere of this, his last and greatest symphony, and was continually getting lost because he was, as we know, completely deaf by then. He was still flapping his arms about when the symphony ended and, like in the movie, someone had to turn him around to see the audience clapping.

 

This reminds me of another movie, with Ed Harris and Susan Kroger, can't remember the title now, in a similar scene showing Beethoven conducting the premiere only Kroger was crouched some few feet away from the podium looking up at Beethoven and cueing him. But he still got lost as I remember. She had to turn him around.

 

There is third movie entitled "Eroica" a BBC Production, which is the name given to Symphony No 3, the first unofficial performance appearing to take place on the top floor of some sumptuous country house. Half the movie is taken up by a complete performance of the the Third (45m) which might seem scary but the events were cleverly interspersed with some of Beethoven's story, his marriage (or his betrothed) and other events. This music was so new and seemed crude to the established glitterati (including Papa Haydn, although they made him say charitable things that he had not quite accepted it yet. There was an excellent scene showing one of these old-order dignitaries, if you will, played brilliantly by Tim Piggot-Smith. He was not a vulger type, all dignified and all, but continually making disparaging remarks about the music. Many could not accept Beethoven at the time. The camera lays hard upon Piggot-Smith's face during the playing of a particularly beautiful passage in the slow movement, and he had to show that despite his skepticism he was succumbing to the music and it wasn't easy for him. Great facial tension, acknowledging his admiration but trying hard to resist it, his illusions in the balance.

 

Go this link and set the progress bar to 7:14 and let run until 9:20, the passage that done in this dude. Two minutes!

 

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This reminds me of another movie, with Ed Harris and Susan Kroger, can't remember the title now, in a similar scene showing Beethoven conducting the premiere only Kroger was crouched some few feet away from the podium looking up at Beethoven and cueing him. But he still got lost as I remember. She had to turn him around.

 

That was Copying Beethoven, with the lovely Diane Kruger.

 

copying-beethoven-2006.jpg

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Yeah Kid, laffite has a good point here.

 

How about instead of tackling that Ludwig piece as your very first venture tinklin' the ol' ivories, you maybe start with THIS little number here and which seems easy enough to pick up...AND which just happens to be a short section from one of my favorite classical pieces...Dvorak's Symphony No.9 "From the New World"...

 

 

The song "Goin' Home"

The theme from the Largo was adapted into the spiritual-like song "Goin' Home", often mistakenly considered a folk song or traditional spiritual, by Dvořák's pupil William Arms Fisher, who wrote the lyrics in 1922. Wikipedia

Edited by laffite

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Ham, re Immortal Beloved

 

 

The camera lays hard upon Piggot-Smith's face during the playing of a particularly beautiful passage in the slow movement, and he had to show that despite his skepticism he was succumbing to the music and it wasn't easy for him. Great facial tension, acknowledging his admiration but trying hard to resist it, his illusions in the balance.

 

Go this link and set the progress bar to 7:14 and let run until 9:20, the passage that done in this dude. Two minutes!

 

 

 

Speaking of expression (body language), the man with the clarinet stood out 10:22 into the clip.

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The Ride of the Valkyries was truly an inspired choice for the movie.

 

For those who might not know, they were lady warriors in Wagner's Die Walkure often represented wearing a kind of headdress with two horns coming out of each side and wielding a spear.

 

And here they are in the form of choppers, great idea!!

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The song "Goin' Home"

The theme from the Largo was adapted into the spiritual-like song "Goin' Home", often mistakenly considered a folk song or traditional spiritual, by Dvořák's pupil William Arms Fisher, who wrote the lyrics in 1922.

 

That's absolutely correct, laffite. The tune was a Dvorak original and he did not lift it from any other source for use in his most remembered and most popular composition.

 

(...btw, you may have watched like I did an unbilled Jan Clayton beautifully sing the Fisher lyricized piece in TCM's recent showing of THE SNAKE PIT)  

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That's absolutely correct, laffite. The tune was a Dvorak original and he did not lift it from any other source for use in his most remembered and most popular composition.

 

(...btw, you may have watched like I did an unbilled Jan Clayton beautifully sing the Fisher lyricized piece in TCM's recent showing of THE SNAKE PIT)  

 

By the way, my post was taken from Wikipedia and I have just now made the correction. I was trying to remember the song. I didn't know that about the song. I thought it WAS taken from a folk song, from the American South. As you must know, the "New World" is America, composed when he came across the pond in 1893. I also read (not knowing this either) that a score of the symphony was taken to the moon by Buzz Aldrin and supposedly left there. It seems kind of silly, really ... or am I not with the program?

:blink:

 

Oh heck, I didn't see The Snake Pit yet. Missed out on that one though but there's always next time.

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The Ride of the Valkyries was truly an inspired choice for the movie.

 

For those who might not know, they were lady warriors in Wagner's Die Walkure often represented wearing a kind of headdress with two horns coming out of each side and wielding a spear.

 

And here they are in the form of choppers, great idea!!

 

DW Griffith's famous and infamous film Birth of a Nation, 1915, was a silent movie but it had utilized a score-- The Ride of the Valkyries by Wagner was in that part of the score which was the musical expression of the arrival of the Ku Klux Klan to save Lillian Gish, the maid of the Confederacy.

 

I love opera, but I've never warmed to Wagner.

 

Just as well because Wagner's biggest fan was Hitler. I'd hate to have a lot in common with Hitler.

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Some thirty years ago, I was heavily into chess. Each evening before dinner, I would sit with my chess set and cram for several hours with several books written by masters of the game. I would also chain smoke and enjoy more than a few cold beers. I did this each evening for almost a year with a special radio set to a local classical station which seemed perfect for the task.

 

I can not tell you the name of a single piece of music I heard in that time, but I enjoyed ninety-nine percent of what I heard.

 

When I began to teach myself piano, classical seemed the natural place to start.

I picked Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor

 

I was nearly 8 years into my study of classical piano before my teacher said I was finally going to be allowed to play a Beethoven Sonata.

 

Prior to that I had played Beethoven Bagatelles-- French definition meaning trinket or just a little bit of nothing.

 

I don't have to tell you Beethoven Bagatelles were anything but.

 

Growing up I was introduced to Beethoven's 9th, the first movement,as the theme to the Huntley and Brinkley NBC news report.

 

My how times have changed.

 

Kid-- I gotta say I'm impressed with you starting with Beethoven's 9th. But since that's his last Symphony, when you start with the 9th, that doesn't give you anyplace to go.

 

Kid, I'm impressed!

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I love opera, but I've never warmed to Wagner.

 

Just as well because Wagner's biggest fan was Hitler. I'd hate to have a lot in common with Hitler.

 

Since Die Walküre is based on Norse mythology, it's not surprising Hitler would had an attraction to Wagnor's work.  On the History Channel "Nazi's and the Occult" Nazi beliefs were tied to Norse mythology, occultisim, Psuedo-Archelolgy, etc. (some stuff off the wall) 

 

Heinrich **** was obsessed with it  Even Hitler thought he was a fanatic. :blink:

Schott%27s_1899_Walkure_title.jpg

 

maxresdefault.jpg

Edited by hamradio
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Re: my last post...

 

Heinrich **** was obsessed with it  Even Hitler thought he was a fanatic.

 

 

TCM word filter, ARE YOU KIDDING ME? :huh: 

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I was always receptive to classical music due to two things...

 

My Mother had long owned an old 78 album of the NUTCRACKER SUITE by Eugene Ormandy and the PHILADELPHIA Orchestra, when I was a kid, and I loved listening to an old 78 of "Peter and The Wolf" around the house( narrated by BAASIL RATHBONE, another name I knew before I knew he made movies) and it wasn't until the mid '70's I decided to delve more into which was which, who composed what, and the difference in conductors and that sort of thing.

 

With the help of the local classical music station and a co-worker friend who was LONG into it, I became better informed and also discovered many beautiful pieces to buy my own copies of and enjoy.  And THAT interest of delving deeper was spurred on admittingly, by wishing to know what the ACTUAL "PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION sounded like BEYOND the "prog-rock" arrangement by Emerson, lake and Palmer!.  Over time I noticed how classical music had long been presented unwittingly to the general public and they never ever realized it!

 

Like, how many times, when say, someone is slowly walking to some percieved doom do you hear them hum CHOPIN's "Sonata #2"?   (you know, "dum-dum-de-dummmm, dum-de-dum-de-dum dah dummmmm...)

 

What music did they use to advertise VANQUISH aspirin tablets?( it was the opening notes to Beethoven's 5th symphony)

 

Whaddya hear when you eat PUFFED WHEAT?( Tchaikowsky's "1812 Overture")

 

 

Millions of people heard the music, but have NO idea what the music IS or who wrote it!

 

And how many people in the recent past had "Fur Elise" as a RINGTONE on their cell phones without really knowing it was Beethoven?

 

Now, for ME, BEETHOVEN is my favorite composer.  In that I like more(actually all) of HIS symphonies more than others.  but I don't neccessarily dislike any of the others works either.

 

some other favorites I've "picked up" over the years are...

 

AARON COPELAND

 

JEAN SIBELIUS

 

GUSTAV HOLST

 

DEBUSSY

 

SMETANA

 

ORFF

 

JANACEK

 

RAVEL

 

PROKOFIEV (which as you know, I already liked)

 

MAHLER

 

Well, I could go on a bit, but you get the gist.

 

And there's no reason you CAN'T like classical music and STILL like other genres either.  But for some reason, there ARE people who woefully limit themselves.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Sepia, your memories of your initial brush with Classical Music reminded me of my own.

 

Around '63 or so and when I was 11 y/o, Pop brought home a brand new Sony 2-channel stereo reel-to-reel tape recorder and about a dozen prerecorded tapes. One of those was a Eugene Ormandy-conducted Philadelphia Orchestra recording of Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture"(WITH cannon, of course), and I too remember being somewhat enthralled with the sounds of that music the first time Pop spliced that tape through the recorder's reading heads and pushed the play button.

 

(...side note: This memory also came back to me almost a couple decades ago when while watching an episode of the sitcom "Frasier" there was a scene in which the snobbish Crane brothers are reminiscing about a similar experience of theirs...Frasier turned to Niles and dismissively says to him, "Remember when dad played the '1812 Overture' for us that first time when we were little, and we thought that that was GOOD music?!"...and of course the even MORE snobbish Niles just giggled and relied "OH yes, how naive we were back then!")

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