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Me and my mom both adore Strauss. Every time I listen to one of his works, I imagine myself wearing a long, beautiful gown and, you guessed it, ballroom dancing. 😊 Also, for Three Stooges fans, this song makes me smile for that reason alone.

 

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Heard this last night on the MUSIC CHOICE classical channel.( I have three or four copies of this, but not by this artist.) But did hear RUDOLF SERKIN perform it with the DSO back in the '70's

Sepiatone

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On 10/2/2020 at 8:59 AM, Sepiatone said:

Let's bump this back up with a little something beautiful.................... (William Mathias, I believe---

Sepiatone

Wow, how about this for meditation time.

BTW, I listened to most of the first moviement of "Emperor."  Good fave choixe? Mine is Gina Bachauer, but they sound very similar, rendition-wise.

Here are some details on the Welsh ...

https://www.allmusic.com/album/welsh-classical-favorites-mw0001824698

 

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I lean more towards Mahler's 1st(but mostly because it was the piece played at the first symphony concert I ever attended.)   And another composer I like who gets overlooked by a lot of people(for some odd reason)-----

And too, can't fail to mention probably the piece I like most from PEER GYNT  along with all the other great pieces from that....

Looks to be the great NEEME JARVI  conducting that unnamed orchestra.

Sepiatone

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Yeah.  Ravel has given us a lot of beautiful music.  Like THIS old "Warhorse".  ;)  

But y'know, for overall pastoral beauty I have to go with----

But that the Debussy clip is of a DSO performance has nothing to do with my choice!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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On 2/15/2021 at 9:12 AM, Sepiatone said:

Yeah.  Ravel has given us a lot of beautiful music.  Like THIS old "Warhorse".  ;)  

But y'know, for overall pastoral beauty I have to go with----

But that the Debussy clip is of a DSO performance has nothing to do with my choice!  ;) 

Sepiatone

It pains me to the quick to read the Ravel there as a "warhorse."  I wouldn't count it such.  It's to sublime for that.  If ever a music was commensurate for it what it might be like to ascend to a heaven or take anyone anywhere they would want to go, then this is it. It is arguably the most beautiful piece in all music  I never get tired of listening to it. Afternoon to a Faun is sheer beauty itself. My ears are blessed when I listen and I always yearn to hear.

Pianist Elisso Virssaladze has the greatest left hand I've ever heard in the following piece. If you're pressed for time or simply don't want to hear the whole damn thing, cheat by going to 15:00 and bedazzle yourself by watching and listening to the last four minutes of piece and the splendid virtuosity therein.

 

 

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22 hours ago, laffite said:

It pains me to the quick to read the Ravel there as a "warhorse."  I wouldn't count it such.  It's to sublime for that. 

 

Relax.  The term "warhorse" in reference to classical music means a work that is long well recognized by those who have an active interest in classical music and those who just hear it passively.   The term is in no way a critique on the music's quality.  Other examples of "warhorses" are BEETHOVEN'S 5th symphony,  TCAIKOWSKY'S Nutcracker Suite,  DEBUSSEY'S La Mer AND the clip of "Faun".  and his CLAIRE De LUNE.   to name but a few.  Still timelessly beautiful, but in this sense, "warhorses" nonetheless.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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15 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Relax.  The term "warhorse" in reference to classical music means a work that is long well recognized by those who have an active interest in classical music and those who just hear it passively.   The term is in no way a critique on the music's quality.  Other examples of "warhorses" are BEETHOVEN'S 5th symphony,  TCAIKOWSKY'S Nutcracker Suite,  DEBUSSEY'S La Mer AND the clip of "Faun".  and his CLAIRE De LUNE.   to name but a few.  Still timelessly beautiful, but in this sense, "warhorses" nonetheless.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Gosh Sep, I'm disappointed to find you so patronizing. You think I don't know what a war horse is? You talk to me as if I started listening the day before yesterday. A war horse is often a piece that even the passive listener's would know. But the Ravel is not that. It leaves the novice cold most of the time, it's more of a connoisseurs' piece, in my opinion. I think it lies beyond the reach of the list you so kindly put for me (gee, thanks, wow I didn't know those). I was making a personal distinction between the general idea behind war horse and a piece that is exquisite and beautiful and oft played but somehow beyond the average war horse. A piece that would be considered "caviar to the General" and not for the "groundings." Anyway, everything's cool, we both love music and you have posted many good pieces here and I enjoy your contributions.

:)

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S'ok.   :)  

Sure, the Ravel you posted is not of the "warhorse" group.  But "Daphnis" is.  After all, I was a novice when I first heard it, and even then it was referred to as a "warhorse" by the announcer on the local classical music station.  And indeed, you know not ALL "warhorses" leave novices  cold.  In Ravel's case, his "Bolero" is one that even people who claim to hate classical music like, probably because they associate it with that silly Dudley Moore movie.  :rolleyes:  And due to that, I'D say the "Bolero" is Ravel's definitive "warhorse">  ;) 

Oh, and thanks for the posting of that concerto.  Now I have to go do some shopping!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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And speaking a bit earlier of DEBUSSY, I like this electronic treatment by Tomita.   If you can recommend  a recording of the piano version(which I could never find in a store for some reason) I'd be appreciative.  :)

 

Sepiatone

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On 2/18/2021 at 8:46 AM, Sepiatone said:

And speaking a bit earlier of DEBUSSY, I like this electronic treatment by Tomita.   If you can recommend  a recording of the piano version(which I could never find in a store for some reason) I'd be appreciative.  :)

 

Sepiatone

When in doubt go straight to Artur Rubinstein. You can't go wrong, The piece in the original piano is wonderful from beginning to end and with with the happy anticipation of that beautifully stark statement that begins at 2:19 in the version above with the voices. With the piano, the phrase of just that few notes mightily stands out almost seeming a center piece. It comes after a mighty crescendo about the middle of the piece and repeated more contemplatively near the end. I'm so glad you posted the above (though I don't like it much, too many notes :lol: ) because I haven't heard this in a long time and was quite moved. Thanks.

 

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;)  Well, you do know that in the Tomita, those aren't really voices, eh?  ;) 

But thanks for the Rubinstein suggestion.  And there are several other pianists who, as with Rubinstein, you can't go wrong.  Like, If I can't nail down a CD of Rubinstein's performance of that piece, there's always THIS virtuoso's interpretation......  His recording of Debussy's IMAGES  I & II  is one I listen to often.

Sepiatone

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