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Princess, I hope you don't mind If I do this, but we have a little Miss Precious doing a movement from one of your fave Beethoven here. I see there is a No.1 and No.2.  Not sure if this is the one you learned.

 

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Princess, I hope you don't mind If I do this, but we have a little Miss Precious doing a movement from one of your fave Beethoven here. I see there is a No.1 and No.2. Not sure if this is the one you learned.

 

 

That's absolutely it! And she played it so beautifully. Much better than I ever played it. Also I found on YouTube Daniel Barenboim playing it. So apparently it's worth playing.

 

Who knows, one day we may turn on the PBS and see the Glorious Lang Lang playing it. Life can be beautiful!

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Unfortunately, the way PBS seems to do things lately, they'll never show her in her prime, but years later on a "pledge week" broadcast when she'll be so old that none of US will still be around to SEE it!

 

But, she does wonderfully on it.  And unlike many prodigies her age, plays the MUSIC more than just the NOTES.

 

 

Sepiatone

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This is one Vaughn Williams many pieces for String Orchestra, a genre he excelled in and can easily be considered the best ever with this. I don't think any other view is even arguable.

 

It's rather long but invest a few minutes, if not more.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QQwjK5HAUA

Edited by laffite
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Vaughn Williams the "best" at it?

 

Well, I wouldn't go that far, as that sort of thing is subjective and from person to person will meet with much resistance.  But I will say THIS----

 

Williams is probably one of the more underrated and FAR too under appreciated among composers of his time.  Or ANY time for that matter.

 

a distraction:----

 

The classical music station in these parts has a Sunday feature they call "Music in Film", on which they play what they feel are movie scores that might appeal to the classical music lover.  Yesterday they played the score from TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by ELMER BERNSTEIN.  And I was struck by the comparison between this film's score and the composing style of AARON COPELAND.

 

Beautiful piece of music nonetheless.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Vaughn Williams the "best" at it?

 

Well, I wouldn't go that far, as that sort of thing is subjective and from person to person will meet with much resistance.  But I will say THIS----

 

Williams is probably one of the more underrated and FAR too under appreciated among composers of his time.  Or ANY time for that matter.

 

a distraction:----

 

The classical music station in these parts has a Sunday feature they call "Music in Film", on which they play what they feel are movie scores that might appeal to the classical music lover.  Yesterday they played the score from TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by ELMER BERNSTEIN.  And I was struck by the comparison between this film's score and the composing style of AARON COPELAND.

 

Beautiful piece of music nonetheless.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

It's hard to make 'best' judgements but I stand my ground on this one. VW wrote much for string orchestra and at a consistently high level. So who, in your subjective person-to-person opinion is better? Give me some resistance?

;)

 

I haven't heard that about being unappreciated but's true that sometime great composers are not recognized early on because they are so young and the music they are composing at that time seem "new" or ahead of its time. At 55, he was widely accepted and admired and he lived to be 84. He is certainly not under appreciated today.

 

How did Aaron Copland enter into the discussion regarding TKAM and Elmer Bernstein? Did the program say something about that? Just curious.

 

Beautiful music nonetheless?

 

:)

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Again-------

 

I said "UNDER" appreciated, NOT "un".  Due to my not often(if ever) hearing Williams' named mentioned in any discussions of classical music I've been privy to.  Nor hearing much of his music on classical radio stations over the years. 

 

Regrettable for sure, but that's all I meant.

 

And Copeland entered the TKAM matter because the similarity in Bernstein's score and Copeland's style was MY impression.

 

I never once claimed Bernstein's style ALWAYS had similarities to Copeland.  And the program said nothing about it.  They just played the music.

 

 

Sepiatone

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  • 4 weeks later...
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Gay, you must have been THRILLED when BLOOD SWEAT and TEARS ended their second album with that "Variations On A Theme By Erik satie".  Which also got some interested in classical music back then too.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Sorry to be late in replying!  Somehow I don't remember that, but will go have a look on YouTube.  Which can be dangerous, as one thing usually leads to another and I'm there for hours. :huh:  

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Bad news for Verdi:

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3822716/Now-Verdi-s-Aida-falls-foul-zealots-Opera-cancelled-Bristol-University-claims-having-white-students-play-Ethiopian-characters-cultural-appropriation.html

 

I saw Aida a very long time ago in San Diego, a lavish production including animals borrowed from the zoo.  Just read that it's being staged at the Met this season, so maybe things aren't so bleak.

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The Emerson, Lake & Palmer version of "Fanfare for the Common Man" reached #2 on the UK charts back in '77. It was the highest charting single released by the prog-rock supergroup.

 

Here's that version from the album. Sorry if this deviates too much from the thread's intent:

 

 

 

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Not at all.  ELP's treatment of Copeland's "Hoedown" from "Rodeo" was good too.

 

In fact, somewhere in this thread I also mentioned them taking the opening theme from JANACEK's "Sinfonettia" to make their song "Knife-Edge" from their first LP, and on "Brain Salad Surgery" the had a treatment of GINESTRA's Piano Concerto #1 (4th movement) for the track "TOCCATA".

 

 

Sepiatone

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It's called pizzicato and Tchaikovsky uses it extensively in the 3rd movement of his 4th Symphony. A good coup since to my knowledge it has not been used (at least to this extent) in any other major symphony.

 

(not to be confused with pizzagate ;-)  )

 

Also see (google) the famous Pizzicato Polka. Not as famous as pizza pie, of course (nothing is more famous than that) but pretty famous, not only for those with hair of certain length, but even some who get a haircut every two weeks (who periodically dabble in the Arts).

 

 

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My favorite Tchaikovsky Symphony is Number 6, the Pathétique. It was his last and the most famous One.

 

Out of curiosity I bought a recording of the first Symphony that Tchaikovsky ever wrote called Winter Dreams and it was really quite beautiful. However, I've never heard it on the radio.

 

Tchaikovsky wrote Winter Dreams in 1866 one year after he graduated from the first class of the St. Petersburg Conservatory.

 

My recording was by the USSR Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Yevgeny Svetlanov.

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Syms 1-3 are not nearly as popular and oft-played Sym 4-6, but as you point out there are nice passages in the earlier ones. #4 and #5 are major war horses in world repertoire but probably are not quite as popular than #6 (as you say), helped by the fact that he died just eight days after the first performance and that the final movement is a masterpiece in its own right (though never played alone on the concert stage) suggesting death. It's so convincing it's good to remind oneself that it is not meant to depress anyone, being an artistic representation of the Final Departure.

 

You may know this already, Tap, but the original title for the symphony was a Russian word that meant, "emotional" or "passionate" but the French mistranslated it as "Pathetique" and unfortunately it stuck---everywhere but Russia where they go with the original.

 

Other interesting bits can be found by clicking on the wiki link below.

 

The video below is a piano transcription of the 3m, an exhilerating march-like piece that never fails to thrill the audience. The latter responds to the rousing finish with burst of applause which is a no-no in concert etiquette since the symphony isn't over yet (no applause between movements, a standard practice) but who can blame them. I recall a 1973 radio concert from Symphony Hall in Boston where the Sixth was conducted by Seije Ozawa and the outburst at the end of the march was thrilling in itself. Those old Boston Sym broadcasts were announced by the venerable William Pierce. Who could forget his voice.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._6_%28Tchaikovsky%29

 

 

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Mon petit Laffite--

 

There's always been a controversy about whether or not Tchaikovsky committed suicide after finishing the 6th.

 

I saw the film The Music Lovers a long time ago and it seemed to imply suicide.

 

Also about that time I saw a documentary where André Previn was being interviewed-- he was conducting the London Symphony Orchestra at this and I was going to school in Paris. I attended some of his recitals. It's so funny he was so far from MGM at that point-- but when I saw him I could only think of Fred Astaire and Gigi.

 

Anyway André Previn made an inconclusive statement that he felt that suicide was not necessarily the case and not too many people have jumped to that conclusion in the past without much evidence.

 

I think the March is an affirmation of life and may even be the last attempt to hold on to life.

 

Whether ot not the composer committed suicide, there's no two ways about it, the work is very lugubrious and extremely depressing-- I should say depressingly wonderful.

 

I really like Swan Lake and the first piano concerto, but I suppose the 6th is simply my favorite of all his works.

 

BTW-- my classical radio station plays Seiji Ozawa and Boston a whole lot-- I always thought that he and Previn were more "groovy" than most of the conductors in the seventies and eighties.

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Someone was listening to the 5th Symphony, and I asked about Tchaikovsky's life.  The view seems to be that he committed suicide via poison for fear he would be outed.  Just so sad.

 

Bravo used to air "Dueling Nutcrackers" on Christmas, but since they're gone all housewifey, sadly it's no longer the case.  I loved seeing this version every year and hope it will return to TV one day.

 

 

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This is not The Nutcracker but it is a scintillating little morsel from Swan Lake. It has a Christimas-y sound IMO. A delight to watch. Six versions in succession.  These are not demonstrably different from each other, at least not to the lay viewer (of which I am a member) as there is not much freedom to attempt a real tour-de-force alternate take with classical ballet. (excepting spoofs or novelty takes, which are for fun only.

 

If you're ambitious and watch all six, see which one is best for you. One category would be to what degree do the four dancers dance in unison. Watching the precise head movements is another.

 

A pas de quatre, bien sur, but it also known as the Four Little Swans.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qu9_VWLCFxY

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I don't normally do this but I think a bump might be appropriate. This vid is so quintessentially Christmas, bearing on the birth of whom so many see as the Savior. It's has a charming appeal that might even touch the unbeliever. Sometimes this is played too fast, I feel this is perfect here. Also, for those who were not on the Board on Christmas day and might not see it as it has been buried by subsequent posts. So now it's on top.

 

Thanks

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Well Nip, I wouldn't exactly call it "classical" music, but Goldsmith IS an excellent composer of orchestral music and often for motion picture scores and themes, and who knows?  Maybe Ludwig AND Pete might have been impressed!  :)

 

Sepiatone

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