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A lot of "boomers" were exposed and familiar with many well known classical pieces without knowing what they were or who composed them.  We somehow knew of and would whistle or hum the 3rd movement of Chopin's piano sonata #2 when sensing impending doom.  We knew of Beethoven's 5th opening four notes from TV commercials for aspirin, or the 1812 overture from cereal commercials and others due to these exposures.

How many recall the use for this light classical piece composed by British composer EDWARD WHITE in 1952? ;)

Another early exposure to classical music themes. :)

Sepiatone

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As a child I had a Ferrante and Teicher recording of the the Warsaw Concerto.

Years later I found out it was from an English movie called Suicide Squadron.

Listening to an extended version on the radio, I bought that CD by the French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet. His Warsaw Concerto CD also includes other classical music from the movies like, The  Adagio, 2nd Movement of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Piano Concerto, which was featured in the classic movie Brief Encounter.

I was wondering if TCM has recently shown Suicide Squadron and if anybody around here has ever seen the movie?

The film is called Dangerous Moonlight in Britain.  The Warsaw Concerto was written by Richard Addinsell, who also wrote the score for Goodbye, Mr. Chips.

This 1941 film concerns a Polish concert pianist who joins the RAF to fight against the Nazis, who have taken his beloved Poland.

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Happy New Year to all too. :)

So, nobody remembers "Puffin' Billy"?  Or are y'all too busy winding your Grandfather Clock.... ;)

Thanks PRINCESS.  It's been too long since I've heard the Warsaw Concerto.  OR seen the movie it was in.

Incidentally, I'll add it to the search for a recording, also of a Richard Addinsell composition, the score for SCROOGE( which we here on the boards simply call A CHRISTMAS CAROL--1951) which features the score played in chronological order.  It SHOULDN'T be hard to find, but we all know how THAT goes sometimes.  Until then, this'll have to do.

 

Sepiatone

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On 1/21/2018 at 6:57 PM, Gershwin fan said:

Note: a tad dissonant :P 

The subject matter is a bit "dissonant" too.

http://www.therestisnoise.com/2008/07/zimmermanns-die.html

 

 

A bit on the lighter side:

Bernhard Kontarsky and his brother Aloys have some wonderful duo piano albums; notably the Debussy/Ravel two-disc set. Here is a selection that was included in that album. This is probably early as it does not conform to that later impressionstic-type idiom that we are accustomed to with Claude.. But it's nice, though.

 

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I see like 28,000 posts on some threads which Trump banality, yet only 158 on this fine thread that could expand one's consciousness.

My favorite classical composers are ones like Saint-Saens with the amazing "The Carnival of Animals" from which "The Aquarium" is taken. It served well in the film "Badlands" and stands on its own too. Anything by Debussy whose "Clair de Lune" still gets airplay though just a minor piece is worth listening to.

A film which is a classical joy to behold, is Ingmar Bergman's tribute to Mozart in "The Magic Flute". I also like anything by Mahler or

Classical music that has an orientalist theme, is of interest to me like that of offbeat composer, Eric Satie with his piano gymnopodies [sp?] and titles like "Three Pieces in the Form of a Pear". I could go on and on but lunch awaits.

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25 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Here's something by Jean Sibelius that you might like.

 

Thank you! By the way, I love Gershwin, both Georgie and Ira. I remember reading George first knew something was wrong when he smelled burning rubber. Yikes!

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On 1/23/2018 at 9:13 AM, Gershwin fan said:

Adolphe Adam aria from Postillon de Lonjumeau. One of my favorites as well.

 

Not to go unappreciated is the rare high D, intoned by Gedda. Start at 3:15 and it will shortly be upon you. It almost sounds unnatural (well, it is.) None of our most admired opera composers ever put one in their operas. This is the only one I know in the literature. It may be the only one ever recorded. It's not one but two steps higher than the famous high C, which is the pinnacle for a tenor. Gedda nails the D with a full chest tone.

 

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12 minutes ago, laffite said:

Not to go unappreciated is the rare high D, intoned by Gedda. Start at 3:15 and it will shortly be upon you. It almost sounds unnatural (well, it is.) None of our most admired opera composers ever put one in their operas. This is the only one I know in the literature. It may be the only one ever recorded. It's not one but two steps higher than the famous high C, which is the pinnacle for a tenor. Gedda nails the D with a full chest tone.

 

Yes, the aria is most known for the high notes that are difficult for a tenor to reach. It's to tenors what the Queen of the Night aria is to sopranos in terms of having extremely high and difficult notes. Adolphe Adam is a very underrated composer in my opinion.

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

Schnittke's Concerto for Piano and Strings

Back in the 70s I attended a recital by a local baritone who's program was standard fare. In the concert he addressed the audience (rare) with the question, "How many here have heard of Alfred Schnittke?" A few hands went up (not mine). I don't remember what he said after that (if anything) but he sang one of Schnittke's songs. It was unusually long (6-7 minutes) and it was obvious that the singer was devoted to it. I don't know the title and no melody comes to mind.

I looked up Schnittke and read that he was influenced by Shostakovich, at least early on. That influence is here in some places. The section beginning at 8:36 is exhilarating and smacks a little of Shosty. At about 6:30 there seems a slow violin section part that seems to play out of tune (intentionally) which I would think very hard to do.The above video was 1 of 2, I may want to look for the other.

 

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18 minutes ago, laffite said:

Gersh, I am curious about your previous avatar, the woman. Who is she? Thanks.

It was Rosa Luxemburg. Before that it was supposed to be a funny pic of Zizek from his movie review of John Carpenter's They Live where he says "I already am eating from the trash can all the time" but the text wasn't big enough so I changed it.

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https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-44764282

Composer Oliver Knussen dies aged 66

The British composer and conductor Oliver Knussen has died at the age of 66 after a short illness.

His publisher Faber Music confirmed his death and saluted his "extraordinary impact on the musical community".

Knussen previously worked with the BBC Symphony Orchestra and most recently with the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group.

An opera adaptation of the children's classic Where the Wild Things Are was among his best-known work.

Last year the conductor cancelled a concert at the Barbican in London after developing pneumonia.

 

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NYT music critics are asked to offer their preferance for the most appealing music to lead the indifferent (or on-the-fence perhaps) to classical music. I wouldn't approve of some of these selections because they are to difficult to be real hook to the novice. And no one should ever include an opera selection (as they do here) because it seems fairly obvious than none of the uninitiated will take to the most noxious of sounds, the operatic human voice. They include some modern composers, like Mike Reich etc that I liked. Gershwin, based on your posts you seem to have an appreciation for the more modern stuff, so you might like these latter types. Incidentally, I missed your post above on Knussen and I'm going to have a look right now.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/06/arts/music/5-minutes-that-will-make-you-love-classical-music.html?action=click&contentCollection=todayspaper&region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=13&pgtype=collection

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