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Appropriate violence and profanity in movies


SansFin
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I am taking a break in watching a self-selected triple-feature prior to a late supper. I realized while writing of the movies in a post on a different board that they all contain certain measures of violence and profanity.

 

Zombieland (2009) depicts zombies tearing the flesh from non-zombies and some gunshot wounds which are quite graphic. There is a smattering of profanity.

 

Killing Zoe (1993) depicts many gunshot wounds and personal violence. Profanity is present throughout the movie.

 

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) depicts gunshots very graphically and some cutting of flesh and other minor incidents of violence. I have read that the f-word is used one-hundred-and-thirty times in the movie. It may be that that count is low. There are other profanities which I will not mention.

 

I like all of these movies very much.

 

I feel that the violence and profanity are intrinsic to their story and that bowdlerized versions would be inane. It is that in all of these movies that violence and profanity are part of the world being depicted. Nice people are kind and speak politely. Bad people hurt other people and swear profusely. 

 

I must wonder if my consideration of these factors is tainted by the fact that I may be relatively immune to the 'shock value' of such things. I often hunted as a youth and could field-dress hares before I could use a shotgun. I trained as a nurse and so find blood and death to be simple facts of life. The city where I grew up is a great port and so language heard on the streets can be quite colorful.

 

How are other people here affected by such violence and profanity? Does it become invisible to you because it is an intrinsic part of the world being depicted?

 

I realize that this issue concerns post-code movies because even the most vile people in movies made during enforcement of the code speak as if they are choirboys and blood from wounds is a stain on clothes or drops on the floor only.

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I'm not bothered by either. Profanity can surprise me if it's been a while since I've watched a movie or show that contains it. But I enjoy the films of Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino, to name a couple of notorious examples, and the profanity adds to the films' verisimilitude, in my opinion. I'm actually more peeved by more minor profanities used in some kids cartoon films than the really graphic, harsh stuff used in gangster or other "street" movies.

 

Violence in film doesn't bother me in the least, as I understand that it is not real and therefore I don't react to it as such. Having an interest in physical make-up effects, I used to enjoy the gorier the merrier, as I liked to see the new breakthroughs in the technology and techniques used. Now that CGI has replaced a great deal of even the lowest make-up effects work, it has lost some of its old joy, but it still doesn't upset me, beyond what it is supposed to do to have impact as a natural part of the story. Over-the-top, excessive violence in movies can even be an enjoyable form of black comedy, for me anyway.

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Profanity don't bother me as long it's not taken to extreme like in "Scarface".  Excess use can hurt a film.

 

Movies like "Armageddon" and "Deep Impact" use the f word once, tastefully done.  One R rated movie that stood out was "Evil Dead" (1981), it's rating was for gore, no profanity or seen any nudity, that's unique.

 

"Smokey and the Bandit" still has the PG rating, even though cursing galore is in the film.  The producer pulled a fast one, put a few  f words into it and tried to get it pass the censors.  Didn't work, the words had to been edited out or received the R rating.  The editing stands out when using headphones.  The scene with the state trooper had it bleeped out with a truck horn.      

 

"Patton" was understandable since they were telling the story of a general that "cursed like a stable boy".  He was known to use rougher language in real life but they wanted the movie to appeal to a wide audience.   Being a war movie, it has little violence.  

 

Read this fun fact why "Annie" (1982) is rated PG concerning violence and gore.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083564/parentalguide

 

Excerpt...

Someone gets hit in the face with a mop. 

 

Well what if it was a clean mop? :lol:

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Profanity don't bother me as long it's not taken to extreme like in "Scarface". Excess use can hurt a film.

 

Movies like "Armageddon" and "Deep Impact" use the f word once, tastefully done. One R rated movie that stood out was "Evil Dead" (1981), it's rating was for gore, no profanity or seen any nudity, that's unique.

 

"Smokey and the Bandit" still has the PG rating, even though cursing galore is in the film. The producer pulled a fast one, put a few f words into it and tried to get it pass the censors. Didn't work, the words had to been edited out or received the R rating. The editing stands out when using headphones. The scene with the state trooper had it bleeped out with a truck horn.

 

"Patton" was understandable since they were telling the story of a general that "cursed like a stable boy". He was known to use rougher language in real life but they wanted the movie to appeal to a wide audience. Being a war movie, it has little violence.

 

Read this fun fact why "Annie" (1982) is rated PG concerning violence and gore.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083564/parentalguide

 

Excerpt...

Someone gets hit in the face with a mop.

 

Well what if it was a clean mop? :lol:

Ham--

 

I would ordinarily agree with you about profanity. But I kind of think the excessive profanity in Scarface is part of the style and the point of the whole movie. The movie is profane.

 

I truly comprehended Al Pacino's betrayal of this animalistic character in Scarface. The profane language certainly fit the realistic subject matter.

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Ham--

 

I would ordinarily agree with you about profanity. But I kind of think the excessive profanity in Scarface is part of the style and the point of the whole movie. The movie is profane.

 

I truly comprehended Al Pacino's betrayal of this animalistic character in Scarface. The profane language certainly fit the realistic subject matter.

 

Wish it had more of this.type of material. 

 

 

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"Smokey and the Bandit" still has the PG rating, even though cursing galore is in the film.  The producer pulled a fast one, put a few  f words into it and tried to get it pass the censors.  Didn't work, the words had to been edited out or received the R rating.  The editing stands out when using headphones.  The scene with the state trooper had it bleeped out with a truck horn.      

 

 

 

I originally saw Smokey and the Bandit in a theater and have loved it ever since.  I've also watched the TV version many many times.  It's so so obvious how many words were over dubbed, mainly Gleason's and kind of funny what they changed it to, for TV but It's still a favorite movie and fun to watch.  If i recall I think there was a scene or to cut or edited too.

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Bad people hurt other people and swear profusely.

The worst people are the ones who put on a front of politeness and urbanity, masking their true evil underneath.

 

Think Herbert Marshall in Foreign Correspondent, or Alexander Scourby in The Big Heat.

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"You mean, let me understand this cause, ya know maybe it's me, I'm a little **** up maybe, but I'm funny how, I mean funny like I'm a clown, I amuse you? I make you laugh, I'm here to **** amuse you? What do you mean funny, funny how? How am I funny?"

 

"Just... you know, how you tell the story, what?"

 

"No, no, I don't know, you said it. How do I know? You said I'm funny. How the **** am I funny, what the **** is so funny about me? Tell me, tell me what's funny!"

 

Get the **** out of here, Tommy!"

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"You mean, let me understand this cause, ya know maybe it's me, I'm a little **** up maybe, but I'm funny how, I mean funny like I'm a clown, I amuse you? I make you laugh, I'm here to **** amuse you? What do you mean funny, funny how? How am I funny?"

 

"Just... you know, how you tell the story, what?"

 

"No, no, I don't know, you said it. How do I know? You said I'm funny. How the **** am I funny, what the **** is so funny about me? Tell me, tell me what's funny!"

 

Get the **** out of here, Tommy!"

This is not gratuitous. This is necessary to show the audience how ****** up the Pesci character was.

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In some films during the production code era, it's obvious the characters would (should?) swear if they were allowed to do so. I have to say I find it unrealistic that in war films from the 40s and 50s, there is no profanity. A group of men fighting for their lives, and they all talk like they were at a tea party? Come on!

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The only problem I have with profanity in movies or TV is that it's a crutch for weak writers. When you can get some kind of reaction from the audience by using profanity (and feel like the baddest kid in middle school by using those words), why bother to write better dialogue? I get extremely bored when each episode of Suits has to have the requisite uses of s***. On the other hand, I love the line in Fat City when a character says that his messed-up girlfriend "had an unhappy childhood and s*** like that." A good writer like Huston knows when to use profanity and when not to use it.

 

I do not want to see violent movies. The quick outbursts of violence in Anthony Mann noirs and westerns are about my limit. If you identify with the victims, horror movies and violent action films are not enjoyable.

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A group of men fighting for their lives, and they all talk like they were at a tea party? Come on!

 

I'm reminded also of the Pvt. Snafu shorts that were shown as part of the five directors who served in World War II spotlight last fall.

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In some films during the production code era, it's obvious the characters would (should?) swear if they were allowed to do so. I have to say I find it unrealistic that in war films from the 40s and 50s, there is no profanity. A group of men fighting for their lives, and they all talk like they were at a tea party? Come on!

 

Exactly what I was thinking earlier and when I began thinking of not only the general difference in language used but the level of graphic violence depicted within two different films made 36 years apart and which reenact the same time and place in human history, the D-Day landings at Normandy's Omaha Beach...1962's THE LONGEST DAY, and 1998's SAVING PRIVATE RYAN.

 

And while the former definitely doesn't depict those landings as any sort of "tea party", compared to Spielberg's later and more graphic depiction of the horrors of war, THE LONGEST DAY does seem to skirt those horrors just that little bit.

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If you identify with the victims, horror movies and violent action films are not enjoyable.

We're supposed to identify with Bonnie and Clyde, even though they both get shot up at the end.

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Exactly what I was thinking earlier and when I began thinking of not only the general difference in language used but the level of graphic violence depicted within two different films made 36 years apart and which reenact the same time and place in human history, the D-Day landings at Normandy's Omaha Beach...1962's THE LONGEST DAY, and 1998's SAVING PRIVATE RYAN.

 

And while the former definitely doesn't depict those landings as any sort of "tea party", compared to Spielberg's later and more graphic depiction of the horrors of war, THE LONGEST DAY does seem to skirt those horrors just that little bit.

Right...and it doesn't even have to be foul language or blood and guts. These earlier war films were so restricted by the code, we couldn't even see the men spit on the ground or scratch themselves. No gritty realism at all.

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After I made my little tea party remark earlier, I remembered there was an episode of the CBS sitcom Major Dad where Gerald McRaney sits down to have tea with his young daughter. A clip from that episode was used in the opening credits. It's really cute.

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-08-06%2Bat%2B10.31.

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Ham--

 

Definitely one of the highlights of Scarface for me.

 

At the time I had HBO. I remember I watched this movie 14 times in a row.

I guess I liked it.

 

14 times in a row!

 

(sorry little tailor, your seven kills in a single swat mean nothing now)

 

I once watched a movie seven times in 10 days. It was great all the way around but it was the direction the that slew me. FLAWLESS. I still maintain that anyone who is studying film must watch this. I had to get everything ready: go the bathroom, make the sandwich, have the drink (non alcoholic, it wouldn't work) within reach, take the phone off the hook (back then, you know).  IOW no INTERRUPTIONS. The scenes follow SEAMLESSLY one to the other with such flow that taking eyes off the screen is a no-no. The director of this Masterpiece (imo) is Charles Sturridge. I am but loathe to name the film since it doesn't seem very popular. Online reviews are tepid at best. I don't claim any special perception into this movie but obviously it touched me no end perhaps because I was simply ready for it at the time (and it helps being of a genre I adore).

 

The title is taken from the book of the same name, Where Angels Fear To Tread, by E.M. Forster, his first novel. The two settings are England and Italy so you get the drift. Starring Rupert Graves, Helena Bonham Carter, Helen Mirren, Barbara Jeffords, Judy Davis, and an interesting Italian fellow, Giovanni Guidelli.

 

So my 7 in 10 pales to 14 in a row. There's always a faster gun.

 

"...for fools rush in where angels fear to tread."

----Alexander Pope (1688-1744)

 

---

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Any profanity, violence and even nudity that's NOT gratuitous is OK by me.  When it's all "over the top" and the main draw to the movie is when I have reservations.

 

Sepiatone

Guess we have to define gratutous.  But I agree with you.  I watched the first episode of Veep on HBO a couple of years ago.  I use the F word way too much, but I learned it from my father.  Sort of like Ralphie and the Old Man in A Christmas Story.

However, they used it way too much in Veep, but did seem to tone it down as the series went on.  I'm sure somebody probably counted how many times it was used.

Maybe it is my advancing years, but nudity and language are not as titallating as they used to be.  I do believe that early on, they did add to some movies realism.

As for violence, I can do without it or accept it. On the other hand, my wife loves it, especially in gangster and horror movies.  Even now she is watching a violent horror movie on Chiller channel.

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And while the former definitely doesn't depict those landings as any sort of "tea party", compared to Spielberg's later and more graphic depiction of the horrors of war, THE LONGEST DAY does seem to skirt those horrors just that little bit.

 

Right in the middle of the assault, on the beach being attacked, there is a table set up and officers are having a meeting (I believe it was Fonda's character ). That's about as close to a tea party as you can get. 

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The title is taken from the book of the same name, Where Angels Fear To Tread, by E.M. Forster, his first novel. The two settings are England and Italy so you get the drift. Starring Rupert Graves, Helena Bonham Carter, Helen Mirren, Barbara Jeffords, Judy Davis, and an interesting Italian fellow, Giovanni Guidelli.

 

I liked that movie, too.

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