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Sever the Cable Cord!


macocael
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How many of you would like to see TCM offer itself as an independent stream via the internet, rather than as part of an expensive cable bundle along with a lot of other channels that you probably dont even watch much?

 

It seems to me that if TCM wants to pull in new generations of viewers, it will have to offer its service as an independent stream for a monthly subscription, just like Hulu, Netflix, HBO, or any number of other channels (heck, even PBS does this now).  Instead of paying your cable company $75 bucks or more a month to include TCM in with a lot of other useless channels, you could just pay TCM directly for a nine or ten dollar fee and watch it via your internet connection.

 

TCM could certainly continue to contract with the Cable companies -- HBO and others do -- but why limit itself to that sole means of distribution?  People want to tailor their television entertainment these days, and TCM should capitalize on the trend.  I bet that subscriptions would increase.

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I don't think they're limiting themselves to just cable. People who subscribe to Sling can watch TCM there, and that is through the internet, not cable. 

 

Sling is basically the streaming version of the cable bundle idea, and you can get TCM  if you add it as an $5 extra onto their bundles.  But  I think TCM would be better off as an independent stream.  Like a lot of streamers, I dont want what Sling offers, I want to fine tune my choices.  I bet there are a lot of potential TCM viewers out there who would opt to subscribe directly to TCM.  I imagine that TCM is not set up yet for it, but it can't be too difficult.

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I was already watching only the local channels (live in a valley, and can't get air signals), as my only way of getting cheap Internet from Comcast in a package deal.

Until I moved to the new apartment where the jack was on the other side of the room from any sensible arrangement of the TV furniture, so now I haven't been able to watch any non-streaming TV at ALL.

 

I'd love for TCM to offer a TCM Go like HBO, but by the fact that TCM Online only offers its classics for a week means there's probably too many licensing issues to make it a reality.

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Sling is basically the streaming version of the cable bundle idea, and you can get TCM  if you add it as an $5 extra onto their bundles.  But  I think TCM would be better off as an independent stream.  Like a lot of streamers, I dont want what Sling offers, I want to fine tune my choices. 

You may be asking for the moon.

 

Sling doesn't have a lot of extra channels. Isn't paying $5 for TCM sort of what you want, if you are suggesting people sever the cable cord and pick up the channel a la carte? So since I have mentioned Sling, I don't see why there's still a problem. If the purpose is to just complain for the sake of complaining, what good does that do? And telling TCM how to offer its services and productions seems a little presumptuous, doesn't it?

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Many regulars on this board know I cut my cable about 4 years ago when it simply became unaffordable. I absolutely LURVE not having all those crummy channels to scroll through looking for something good to watch. I've always felt cable was a scam and catered to the lowest common denominator.

 

There is PLENTY to choose from on regular over-the-air television; local/national news, 4 PBS stations and more "retro" TV/movie channels popping up all the time.

 

Streaming offers several free channels and reasonably priced channels you can easily subscribe & unsubscribe to as well. It seems to me the closest thing to an "a la carte" system everyone desires.

 

And who doesn't have more DVDs than they can even watch?

 

Now, if we can only wake up & realize the cell phone "plans" are ripping you off just the same as the cable companies.....vote with your dollars, people.

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TCM is establishing an upcoming streaming service called Film Struck, a partnership with Criterion Collection and a number of other video companies. Whether the channel itself as seen on TV will be provided via the service is to be revealed.

 

I have mixed feelings about this push for streaming everything. I feel like this urging of streaming to be the norm will only continue the marginalization of these films and inevitably limit our access to them as companies find it harder and harder to monetize the stuff.

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Please help this tech-moron understand (I don't even own a cell-phone.) 

 

Like Tikisoo, I hate sorting through 1500 plus stations, but that's the package I have to pay for at Time Warner Cable to get TCM. I would get only basic cable if not for that one station for me and ESPN for my son.

 

So you're all saying I can get  TCM on my computer?  That's "streaming?"  Hmmm.

 

A laptop is another thing I don't have, so watching online means sitting up at this desk instead of in my recliner with my dog on my lap -- big disadvantage for a two hour movie.  I would also lose the whole point of a big screen Hi-def TV.

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I too, don't subscribe to the idea of watching TV shows or movies on some expensive "hand-held" device, or my scrawny 19" PC monitor.

 

And I WON'T shell out bucks for a laptop because some "nose-divers" think it's "the thing to DO".

 

I have no issues with my cable service in this case since TCM has always been included in even their "basic" cable package.

 

And going from one room to use my desktop PC to another to watch TV is NO inconvenience to ME, as my house isn't that big, and I'm not THAT lazy. Plus, I could USE the excersize!  :D   And I'm not enamored of the idea of "collecting" technology based on "just because I CAN".    But I see nothing wrong with Macocael's idea, as long as TCM doesn't abandon their cable accessability.  My only hope is that TCM "streamers" don't follow those two California idiots who walked off a cliff while playing "Pokemon Go" and hurt themselves trying to watch BEN HUR in  "letterbox" on a 3" smart-phone screen.  :wacko:

 

 

Sepiatone

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Please help this tech-moron understand (I don't even own a cell-phone.) 

 

Like Tikisoo, I hate sorting through 1500 plus stations, but that's the package I have to pay for at Time Warner Cable to get TCM. I would get only basic cable if not for that one station for me and ESPN for my son.

 

So you're all saying I can get  TCM on my computer?  That's "streaming?"  Hmmm.

 

A laptop is another thing I don't have, so watching online means sitting up at this desk instead of in my recliner with my dog on my lap -- big disadvantage for a two hour movie.  I would also lose the whole point of a big screen Hi-def TV.

 

I have Time Warner also. If your system is anything like mine, you can designate certain channels as favorites using the "Settings" button on your remote. Then, using the "Guide" button on the remote, you can set your cable box to only display your selected favorite channels when you call up the grid.

 

I do share your preference for sitting in a recliner, but I do so with a cat in my lap. :) Sometimes I do stretch on the couch instead, but that's only because the cat has already nabbed the chair for himself.

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Please help this tech-moron understand (I don't even own a cell-phone.) 

 

Like Tikisoo, I hate sorting through 1500 plus stations, but that's the package I have to pay for at Time Warner Cable to get TCM. I would get only basic cable if not for that one station for me and ESPN for my son.

 

So you're all saying I can get  TCM on my computer?  That's "streaming?"  Hmmm.

 

A laptop is another thing I don't have, so watching online means sitting up at this desk instead of in my recliner with my dog on my lap -- big disadvantage for a two hour movie.  I would also lose the whole point of a big screen Hi-def TV.

 

You don't need a computer to stream a film online. A smart TV solves the problem (mine is a Sharp Roku but there are many comparable brands). It picks up the internet signal from my wireless router. So when I turn the TV on, it allows me to go streaming channels like Amazon Prime, Hulu, Sling and Netflix. Or I can go to YouTube. Plus I can access a media player if I want to watch something I have on a flash drive (which inserts into the side of the TV). There is also a way for me to use my DVD player and to use an antenna or cable. But since I don't have cable, I just use all the streaming channels, the media player and my DVD player.

 

I stopped using cable in June 2015 and it's the best decision I ever made. When I look at discs of films I recorded off TCM, the old Fox Movie Channel or the Encore channels using cable, I can see there was always some slight problem with the picture quality. For years, I paid for quality cable service and never really received it. But with streaming, there is no problem with the picture quality and I'm much happier.

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How many of you would like to see TCM offer itself as an independent stream via the internet, rather than as part of an expensive cable bundle along with a lot of other channels that you probably dont even watch much?

 

It seems to me that if TCM wants to pull in new generations of viewers, it will have to offer its service as an independent stream for a monthly subscription, just like Hulu, Netflix, HBO, or any number of other channels (heck, even PBS does this now).  Instead of paying your cable company $75 bucks or more a month to include TCM in with a lot of other useless channels, you could just pay TCM directly for a nine or ten dollar fee and watch it via your internet connection.

 

TCM could certainly continue to contract with the Cable companies -- HBO and others do -- but why limit itself to that sole means of distribution?  People want to tailor their television entertainment these days, and TCM should capitalize on the trend.  I bet that subscriptions would increase.

 

Directv has more useless channels than cable. (sigh)

 

By the way, if you sever the cable cord, the internet is lost as well. (well mine anyway) :huh: 

Arris-TM822G-Modem.jpg

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How many of you would like to see TCM offer itself as an independent stream via the internet, rather than as part of an expensive cable bundle along with a lot of other channels that you probably dont even watch much?

 

It seems to me that if TCM wants to pull in new generations of viewers, it will have to offer its service as an independent stream for a monthly subscription, just like Hulu, Netflix, HBO, or any number of other channels (heck, even PBS does this now).  Instead of paying your cable company $75 bucks or more a month to include TCM in with a lot of other useless channels, you could just pay TCM directly for a nine or ten dollar fee and watch it via your internet connection.

 

TCM could certainly continue to contract with the Cable companies -- HBO and others do -- but why limit itself to that sole means of distribution?  People want to tailor their television entertainment these days, and TCM should capitalize on the trend.  I bet that subscriptions would increase.

 

Its on the way this fall  http://filmstruck.com/

 

I don't think they're limiting themselves to just cable. People who subscribe to Sling can watch TCM there, and that is through the internet, not cable. 

 

I have Sling. When I was leaving Dish Network, I sat and counted the channels I actually watch and would really like to have. Sling had all but, a few. Then after I got Sling, they acquired all the rest on my list. It does freeze up at times but, otherwise, I love it. $30 a month which is a third of what I used to pay. What my mother paid for cable in the 1980's :lol:  

 

Many regulars on this board know I cut my cable about 4 years ago when it simply became unaffordable. I absolutely LURVE not having all those crummy channels to scroll through looking for something good to watch. I've always felt cable was a scam and catered to the lowest common denominator.

 

There is PLENTY to choose from on regular over-the-air television; local/national news, 4 PBS stations and more "retro" TV/movie channels popping up all the time.

 

Streaming offers several free channels and reasonably priced channels you can easily subscribe & unsubscribe to as well. It seems to me the closest thing to an "a la carte" system everyone desires.

 

And who doesn't have more DVDs than they can even watch?

 

Now, if we can only wake up & realize the cell phone "plans" are ripping you off just the same as the cable companies.....vote with your dollars, people.

 

The cable/satellite industry is losing hundreds of thousands of customers every quarter. People are finally seeing the light. I have Roku for streaming.

 

Please help this tech-moron understand (I don't even own a cell-phone.) 

 

Like Tikisoo, I hate sorting through 1500 plus stations, but that's the package I have to pay for at Time Warner Cable to get TCM. I would get only basic cable if not for that one station for me and ESPN for my son.

 

So you're all saying I can get  TCM on my computer?  That's "streaming?"  Hmmm.

 

A laptop is another thing I don't have, so watching online means sitting up at this desk instead of in my recliner with my dog on my lap -- big disadvantage for a two hour movie.  I would also lose the whole point of a big screen Hi-def TV.

 

"1500 plus station" ? You mean the 40 music stations ? (who turns on their tv to listen to music ?), 20 religious stations , 20 home shopping stations ? That they use to pump up the numbers. So you feel like you are getting a lot when the average viewer only watches 19 channels out of 300 or whatever.

 

You don't need a computer to stream a film online. A smart TV solves the problem (mine is a Sharp Roku but there are many comparable brands). It picks up the internet signal from my wireless router. So when I turn the TV on, it allows me to go streaming channels like Amazon Prime, Hulu, Sling and Netflix. Or I can go to YouTube. I can also access a media player if I want to watch something I have on a flash drive (which inserts into the side of the TV). There is also a way for me to use my DVD player and to use an antenna or cable. But since I don't have cable, I just use all the streaming channels, the media player and my DVD player.

 

I stopped using cable in June 2015 and it's the best decision I ever made. When I look at discs of films I recorded off TCM, the old Fox Movie Channel or the Encore channels using cable, I can see there was always some slight problem with the picture quality. For years, I paid for quality cable service and never really received it. But with streaming, there is no problem with the picture quality and I'm much happier.

 

My neighbor has that tv. I helped her set it up and she is in love with it now ! I forgot, with a smart tv, you can watch youtube movies on your tv screen. If you cobble all that together, that's quite a bit of programming on the cheap.  

 

Directv has more useless channels than cable. (sigh)

 

By the way, if you sever the cable cord, the internet is lost as well. (well mine anyway) :huh:

Arris-TM822G-Modem.jpg

 

My other neighbor only uses Time Warner for the cable access. I use a company that is pure internet, no bundles. It is possible if you shop around to find internet by itself depending on where you live. Often times cheaper too !

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You don't need a computer to stream a film online. A smart TV solves the problem (mine is a Sharp Roku but there are many comparable brands). It picks up the internet signal from my wireless router. So when I turn the TV on, it allows me to go streaming channels like Amazon Prime, Hulu, Sling and Netflix. Or I can go to YouTube. I can also access a media player if I want to watch something I have on a flash drive (which inserts into the side of the TV). There is also a way for me to use my DVD player and to use an antenna or cable. But since I don't have cable, I just use all the streaming channels, the media player and my DVD player.

But with streaming, there is no problem with the picture quality and I'm much happier.

 

 

I use the Playstation 3's apps (no, honestly, I bought it back in '08 when it was the only affordable Blu-ray player that worked, and now I have a free Blu 3D player!), which is more used to streaming high amounts of data more quickly for its online-gamers, and the quality for streaming on the living-room flatscreen is much clearer and broadcast-HD on less bandwidth.  Might get a Roku or AppleTV if they stream Instant Warner Archive, but otherwise the little cheap box is a bit inferior. 

And while you can still get Amazon and Netflix on SmartTV's, the industry seems to be moving away from apps they can't update.  My old Panasonic Viera from five years ago saw all its foreign low-rent apps disappear, and now I'm left with just Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, the weather and Internet-radio.

 

The problem with new streaming startups is that they're still convinced we're only watching streaming on our Cool Cellphones and Tablets (because they don't really use this stuff themselves, you see), when in fact, it was smart-TV's, STB's and game consoles that first popularized cord-cutting for the living room.

It's nice to watch Instant Warner Archive on the tablet in bed or in the kitchen (or bathroom), but Warner's still believing Microsoft's hype and using an ancient Silverlight-based stream that can only be used on desktops.  If a new stream can't make that console app, they're doomed from the start.

 

(And while I watch HuluPlus for other reasons than Criterion, it'll be nice to have Criterion and TCM in the same place.)

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I have Sling. When I was leaving Dish Network, I sat and counted the channels I actually watch and would really like to have. Sling had all but, a few. Then after I got Sling, they acquired all the rest on my list. It does freeze up at times but, otherwise, I love it. $30 a month which is a third of what I used to pay. What my mother paid for cable in the 1980's :lol:  

 

 

 

 

I will NEVER have Dish Network!!  The nutjob customer support I got on the phone, all I asked were to be taken off their mailing list. (junk mail) She said Calm down, what's the problem?  I was calm, simply asked her to remove me, OMG she went on a rant implying I needed counseling or something.  I've never encountered anyone like that in my life.

 

Least I got rid of their mailings and hope Dish got rid of her!

 

rude-receptionist1.jpg

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I have Time Warner also. If your system is anything like mine, you can designate certain channels as favorites using the "Settings" button on your remote. Then, using the "Guide" button on the remote, you can set your cable box to only display your selected favorite channels when you call up the grid.

 

I do share your preference for sitting in a recliner, but I do so with a cat in my lap. :) Sometimes I do stretch on the couch instead, but that's only because the cat has already nabbed the chair for himself.

Oh thanks, Clore!  I'm going to try that.  As GGGGerald says, I don't really need the music stations, the home shopping, the low-def versions of the high-def stations, the Golf channel, the children's networks,  the Say Yes to the Dress network, C-SPAN, C-SPAN 2, C-SPAN3 ...

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I will NEVER have Dish Network!!  The nutjob customer support I got on the phone, all I asked were to be taken off their mailing list. (junk mail) She said Calm down, what's the problem?  I was calm, simply asked her to remove me, OMG she went on a rant implying I needed counseling or something.  I've never encountered anyone like that in my life.

 

Least I got rid of their mailings and hope Dish got rid of her!

 

rude-receptionist1.jpg

 

I get mail from Dish Network and Time Warner regularly. TW has their wiring attached to my home because a neighbor has it. So I ended up on their list. A man even came by to try to sell it do me. Tried to be all friendly and it was like pulling teeth to find out what he wanted. The are relentless because they are desperate.

 

I get my landline through AT&T and they call everyday about something. And I just got a postcard telling me they will sell my number to other companies so they can bother me too ! I'm getting ready to cut them also and get a VOiP phone (more technology). Which would cut my phone bill from $35 to $10.

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I like my cable system (Charter) and prefer to receive TCM and other stations/networks in that manner.  Have no desire to ever watch TV on a computer, laptop, phone or similar devices.

Really do not want to have a system that requires me to be "online" in order to watch TV.

Naturally I would like to be able to select exactly which 25 or so stations I really want and eliminate all sports, all kids and others.

However, I realize that would create a tremendous cost for the provider which would have to be passed on to the customers.  Maybe as technology advances, it will advance also.

As for TCM, remember NO commercials, but somebody has to pay.  

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Charter Cable is included in my rent, so I can't sever the ties. However, my TV was in the shop for a week and I had no choice but to watch You Tube. I watched some pretty interesting stuff that week and didn't miss cable at all. The only film I couldn't get for free was When Worlds Collide, which I haven't seen in ages. Oh, well.

But I hear ya about cable. I was all set to watch Boston B l a c k I e one night and the picture froze, which happens anytime I want to watch something desperately. I hate cable!

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Oh thanks, Clore!  I'm going to try that.  As GGGGerald says, I don't really need the music stations, the home shopping, the low-def versions of the high-def stations, the Golf channel, the children's networks,  the Say Yes to the Dress network, C-SPAN, C-SPAN 2, C-SPAN3 ...

 

You're quite welcome. I was just watching the races from Saratoga on channel 1994 on my system, which will give you an idea of how many channels we're given. We no longer have any low-def stations unless it's the only format - such as Antenna TV. Yet for some reason I have doubles of quite a few stations - including TCM and all of the news channels.

 

For a while, TWC was shutting off my box if it was on the same station for three hours between midnight and 6am. I called to complain and they told me they do that to save bandwidth since a lot of people fall asleep with the TV on. This was despite the setting on my box about the auto shut-off feature being set to "off."

 

I told them that if they wanted to save bandwidth, they could eliminate all of the music, foreign language and shopping channels as I never watch them. I was advised that if I upgraded to a DVR box, that the DVRed recording would not be affected. I demanded to speak to a supervisor and to shorten the story, I'll just say that I ended up with a 30 dollar credit, a free DVR box and free HBO/Cinemax for a year. And my bill was now 17 dollars less each month.

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One thing I did like about Dish Network was that they would fight the networks to keep prices low. One dispute they had with AMC was very telling. Dish was totally happy to keep AMC. They just didn't want : IFC, Sundance channel, WE tv and BBC America.

 

AMC forces any provider to take all five channels as a package. And since shows like Mad Men and The Walking Dead were still on and garnering major ratings, AMC felt they had the leverage to do this. Most channels on cable/satellite are packaged this way. Problem is, only one or two of the channels are really relevant. The others are just filler to make it seem you're getting more channels. And of course they have to raise the price even though they know you aren't watching them.

 

That's why with A la carte, so many channels would just fade away. If each channel had to survive on its own, very few would. 

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