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any oscar movies you think = WHAT THE HECK !


wheel123

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im curious if anyone of you has any opinions on oscar winning movies that you cant believe won.

 

or any movie thats critically acclaimed that you think is a stinkeroo

 

YEAR

MOVIE TITLE SEEN

 

1928 (1st)

Wings, Sunrise

1929 (2nd)

Broadway Melody, The

1930 (3rd)

All Quiet on the Western Front

1931 (4th)

 

Grand Hotel Cimarron

1932 (5th)

Grand Hotel

1933 (6th)

Cavalcade

1934 (7th)

It Happened One Night

1935 (8th)

Mutiny on the Bounty

1936 (9th)

Great Ziegfeld, The

1937 (10th)

Life of ?mile Zola, The

1938 (11th)

You Can't Take It With You

1939 (12th)

 

Gone with the Wind Gone with the Wind ?

1940 (13th)

 

1939 (12th)

 

Gone with the Wind

Rebecca ?

1941 (14th)

How Green Was My Valley

1942 (15th)

Mrs. Miniver

1943 (16th)

Casablanca ?

1944 (17th)

Going My Way

1945 (18th)

The Lost Weekend

1946 (19th)

The Best Years of Our Lives

1947 (20th)

Gentleman's Agreement

1948 (21st)

Hamlet (1948) ?

1949 (22nd)

All the King's Men

1950 (23rd)

All about Eve

1951 (24th)

An American in Paris

1952 (25th)

The Greatest Show on Earth

1953 (26th)

From Here to Eternity

1954 (27th)

On the Waterfront

1955 (28th)

Marty

1956 (29th)

Around the World in 80 Days ?

1957 (30th)

The Bridge on the River Kwai ?

1958 (31st)

Gigi ?

1959 (32nd)

Ben-Hur

1960 (33rd)

The Apartment

1961 (34th)

West Side Story

1962 (35th)

Lawrence of Arabia

1963 (36th)

Tom Jones

1964 (37th)

My Fair Lady

1965 (38th)

The Sound of Music ?

1966 (39th)

A Man for All Seasons

1967 (40th)

In the Heat of the Night

1968 (41st)

Oliver!

1969 (42nd)

Midnight Cowboy

1970 (43rd)

Patton ?

1971 (44th)

The French Connection

1972 (45th)

The Godfather ?

1973 (46th)

The Sting

1974 (47th)

The Godfather Part II ?

1975 (48th)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest ?

1976 (49th)

Rocky

1977 (50th)

Annie Hall

1978 (51st)

The Deer Hunter ?

1979 (52nd)

Kramer vs. Kramer ?

1980 (53rd)

Ordinary People ?

1981 (54th)

Chariots of Fire ?

1982 (55th)

Gandhi ?

1983 (56th)

Terms of Endearment

1984 (57th)

Amadeus ?

1985 (58th)

Out of Africa ?

1986 (59th)

Platoon ?

1987 (60th)

The Last Emperor

1988 (61st)

Rain Man ?

1989 (62nd)

Driving Miss Daisy

1990 (63rd)

Dances With Wolves ?

1991 (64th)

The Silence of the Lambs ?

1992 (65th)

Unforgiven ?

1993 (66th)

Schindler's List ?

1994 (67th)

Forrest Gump ?

1995 (68th)

Braveheart ?

1996 (69th)

The English Patient ?

1997 (70th)

Titanic (1997) ?

1998 (71st)

Shakespeare in Love ?

1999 (72nd)

American Beauty ?

2000 (73rd)

Gladiator ?

2001 (74th)

A Beautiful Mind ?

2002 (75th)

Chicago ?

2003 (76th)

The Lord of The Rings: The Return of The King ?

2004 (77th)

Million Dollar Baby ?

2005 (78th)

Crash ?

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Actually, I've come to believe that a Best Picture award is a clear sign of a film's mediocrity. Broadway Melody, Cimarron, Cavalcade, You Can't Take It With You, The Greatest Show on Earth, Rocky, Kramer vs. Kramer, A Beautiful Mind, and Chicago are all extremely weak movies in comparison to others that were made in the same years.

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My worst winners list would be:

 

The Lost Weekend

An American in Paris

The Greatest Show on Earth

Tom Jones

Annie Hall

Terms of Endearment

Titanic

Gladiator

Return of the Rings

 

 

Films that SHOULD have won:

 

The Quiet Man

The Quiet Man

The Quiet Man

The Quiet Man

and

The Quiet Man

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Million Dollar Baby just wasn't a "best picture" movie. I'd have chosen The Aviator if I had to choose from the nominees.

 

I also agree that The Greatest Show on Earth shouldn't have won. Gigi shouldn't have either.

 

Taxi Driver should have won instead of Rocky.

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I thought the acting and story in "Cinderella Man" with Richard Crowe's portrayal of James J. Braddock was overwhelmingly better than that tripe "Million Dollar Baby'. First of all it was a true story, with a better plot and far superior than the fictional garbage that the academy thought they owed another one to Eastwood who hasn't made a good movie since "In the Line of Fire". I really believe "Million Dollar Baby" was nominated and won over "Cinderella Man", because the Academy felt like they owed Eastwood another one because both pictures were made in 2005. It is beyond me why "Cinderella Man" a far superior film than "Million Dollar Baby" did not even get nominated ( Maybe the Academy has an unwritten rule that God forbid two boxing films couldn't dare be nominated the same year). If it did go against "Cinderella Man" it would have been ( Like in Boxing) an obvious "Fix" that it won because of Eastwood. That's one persons opinion.

 

Bartlett

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I can't see Crash winning over Brokeback Mountain last year. There are a couple of good moments in it, but I can't see it standing the test of time like I'm sure Brokeback will.

 

I've never seen Million Dollar Baby but I can't imagine it's better than Cinderella Man. That's an awesome film, with another good performance from Russell Crowe. I have yet to see him in something I don't like.

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Brad dear, we disagree again.

 

I still think Crash is the best picture made in years, since Gentlemen's Agreement in fact, and Brokeback, except for its' controversial subject will disappear with ease. Also, again, here are those personal preferences again, I absolutely love 'The Greatest Show on Earth', and never watch Russell Crowe movies, because I dislike him almost as much as marble mouth Brando, for very much the same reason, he can't talk, or I can't understand him, whichever.

 

But again, personal preferences are what make the world go 'round. - My list of shouldn't haves:

 

From Here to Eternity (nothing special, just a story)

Midnight Cowboy (sicko, meets sicko)

Annie Hall - (weirdo meets weirdo)

Out of Africa ( too long, and boring - nice scenery tho)

The English Patient ( too long and boring)

Shakespeare in Love ( just didn't like it - no viable reason)

Chicago (worst musical ever made, second only to Moulin Rouge Kidman version)

 

Anne

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> and never

> watch Russell Crowe movies, because I dislike him

> almost as much as marble mouth Brando, for very much

> the same reason, he can't talk, or I can't understand

> him, whichever.

>

Anne

 

I hated Russell Crowe also, but since seeing "Cinderella Man" have done a 360 degree turn on my opinion of his acting abilities. This film is a bio-pic of boxing great James J. Braddock and his struggle to keep his family together during the Great depression. It also has an outstanding performance by Renee Zellweger and Paul Giamatti. I recently commented on the "Good Movies I've just seen" thread and if you like could go there to read my reveiw. As I said before Russell Crowe was on the bottom of my list of favorite actors, but since seeing "Cinderella Man" has sky rocketed towards the top of my favorites. I guarantee if you give this film a chance you will not regret it. It is made like "Old Time Hollywood", and is a "Door Buster", to say the least. Also made in 2005, it is a "Classic" ( I'm one of the one's who think any movie made after 1959 should not be considered classic yet!)

 

Bartlett

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> Actually, I've come to believe that a Best Picture

> award is a clear sign of a film's mediocrity.

 

I agree with that. In fact, I rarely watch TCM during Oscar month, and I never watch the awards. It's not that "bad" pictures tend to win, it's that there's usually something better out there. Every once in a while I get a nice surprise, like the Best Picture Awards for "Unforgiven" and "Silence of the Lambs," but that's very rare.

 

The fact that Scorcese still hasn't won Best Picture is proof that the process isn't really about finding the best.

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> Actually, I've come to believe that a Best Picture

> award is a clear sign of a film's mediocrity.

 

 

Obviously you are probably a "Rocky Horror" and "A Bucket of Blood" film fanatic and wouldn't know a good movie if you saw one. That's my opinion.

 

Bartlett

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Hello - I like Russell Crowe - he's had some great performances and I think he's a good actor.

 

As you know, I also think Marlon Brando was the greatest actor - as some of us here like Brando - I don't think it's nice to always call him "marble mouth". It's fine if you don't like him - but to always use these names seems a little mean-spirited to me.

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> Chicago (worst musical ever made, second only to

> Moulin Rouge Kidman version)

 

 

Anne, I totally agree with you here. How is it, then, that I so disagree with the following statement you made in the same post?

 

 

> I still think Crash is the best picture made

> in years, since Gentlemen's Agreement in fact,

 

Personally, I think Crash and Gentleman's Agreement are exactly the sort of mildly liberal but bland movies that Hollywood loves to honor in order to feel slightly better about themselves. Both have valuable messages, of course, but I don't find either especially interesting as a movie. (Surely, David Lean's spectacular adaptation of Great Expectations should have won instead of Gentleman's Agreement -- at least, out of the movies nominated that year.)

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> > Actually, I've come to believe that a Best Picture

> > award is a clear sign of a film's mediocrity.

>

>

> Obviously you are probably a "Rocky Horror" and "A

> Bucket of Blood" film fanatic and wouldn't know a

> good movie if you saw one. That's my opinion.

>

> Bartlett

 

 

That's quite a leap in logic, isn't it, Bartlett? Just because I don't have to wait for the Hollywood community to tell me which movies to value each year means I'm not capable of recognizing quality filmmaking on my own?

 

The problem with the Oscars is that they're driven by the politics of the moment. I mean, the only reason Broadway Melody won Best Picture for 1929 was because Hollywood wanted to demonstrate their commitment to talkies -- even though several silent films made the same year were obviously superior examples of quality filmmaking: The Kiss and the now-fragmentary 4 Devils and The Patriot. It still boggles my mind, however, that, since Hollywood felt obliged to give the award to a talkie, they gave it the MGM picture rather than to Paramount's far more innovative and enjoyable Applause.

 

There are plenty of other examples like that throughout Oscar's history. In fact, the Academy Award has only rarely gone to the film that most critics, historians, and even average film buffs would consider the best film of any given year.

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I didn't like All About Eve - I watched it a few times and always had the same opinion - the movie is boring.

 

I also didn't like Casablanca - don't know what the hoopla was with that film - very boring.

 

I saw Gentleman's Agreement and fell asleep on it midway through - so I guess I didn't like that film.

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>

> That's quite a leap in logic, isn't it, Bartlett?

> Just because I don't have to wait for the Hollywood

> community to tell me which movies to value each year

> means I'm not capable of recognizing quality

> filmmaking on my own?

>

 

 

Were talking about box office appeal. The people who buy tickets dictate what's a hit and what's not a hit not Hollywood and that is logic.

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> Were talking about box office appeal. The people who

> buy tickets dictate what's a hit and what's not a hit

> not Hollywood and that is logic.

 

Actually, we weren't talking about box office appeal. The topic of this thread is Oscar winners that shouldn't have won, which often has little to nothing to do with box office appeal.

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Were talking about box office appeal. The people who buy tickets dictate what's a hit and what's not a hit not Hollywood and that is logic. >>

 

If box office appeal is all that matters in making hit movies then most of the classic films we love would be unknown because many of them bombed at the box office upon their initial release.

 

It was only years later, thanks to a new generation of filmgoers that these films found an audience and are now heralded as classics because it often didn't happen on its original release.

 

No offense, Bartlett, but if equating good films to only box office appeal I think your logic might be a tad flawed.

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As I've often pointed to anyone who I can force to listen, there are two types of movie critics--those who like the Academy's choices for best picture and those who are worth reading. To be fair, there are many best pictures with low reputations that I have never seen. I've never seen "Wings" though I have never heard anyone argue that it is a better movie than "Sunrise." Supposedly "Cimarron" and "Cavalcade" are just deadly, as so is "The Great Ziegfeld." One best picture from the thirties I did not like was "The Life of Emile Zola." How do you make a boring movie about the Dreyfus case? Now here is a military, if not military industrial conspiracy, worthy of Oliver Stone's attention.

"Gentleman's Agreement" has a bad reputation; I think it was Elia Kazan who said that the moral of the story was that you should never be mean to a Jew because he might be a Gentile in disguise.

 

Of course the Academy's judgement is absolutely appalling. One could look at the prejudice against comedy, so that Groucho Marx, Fred Astaire, Myrna Loy and Cary Grant (!!!) go unrecognized. Then they give the award to Judy Holliday, presumably for no better reason was that she was so much younger than Gloria Swanson and Bette Davis. Never giving Alfred Hitchcock, or Ingmar Bergman or Orson Welles or Stanley Kubrick the best director. And does anyone really think that "Rebecca" was the one Hitchcock movie to get a best picture award. One could just go on and on.

 

Does anyone think for instance that Ben-Hur was the best picture of 1959? Why? Why would anyone think that Charleton Heston was the best actor of the year? How was he better than Jack Lemmon in "Some Like it Hot?" or Cary Grant in "North by Northwest?" Or John Wayne in "Rio Bravo?" I haven't seen "An American in Paris" or "Gigi," but I doubt they're as good as "Singin' in the Rain" or "The Band Wagon." I can imagine why people might not like "Se7en" "Richard III" "Twelve Monkeys," "The Usual Suspects," "Dead Man Walking" "The Secret of Roan Innish," "To Die For," or "Clueless." What I can't imagine is why people would think "Braveheart" was better that any of those movies, let all of them.

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