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Hello, all. I'm making a friend take this course so I can watch the assignments at his place. I dream of the day TCM is a standalone service for Apple TV.

 

I cannot wait to hear all the reactions and insights on this board!

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Loved the Summer of Darkness course, so I'm back for this one, although I'm not drawn to this genre at all. Willing to learn, though. And maybe I should just lighten up, eh? Have fun, everybody.  

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Hi, everybody!

I'm Stephanie from Alabama. I didn't participate in the Noir class last summer, so I'm not familiar with how all of this works. I'm a big fan of classic slapstick movies, so I signed up when I saw the ad for this course. I love Chaplin and the Marx Brothers, and of course everyone loves Lucy. I'm looking forward to learning new things and discovering new movies I haven't seen before. I'm excited to get started with all of you. 

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Sure does DR. Edwards:

I noted that "Page 2" comes tomorrow (8/29).

 

I did have another question: When the last week of the course occurs I'll be out of town for a full week. I don't have tablet or smart phone. Will there be a few weeks after course ends to "finish it and take exam"? Is there a "drop dead" date by which you must complete the course? I know the certificate will only show me I completed something, and nothing else, but I'd like to stick with it.

 

Glad I found the course. Hoping you can do one on early sound musicals, like Vitaphones, TCM has a lot of those as well as musical shorts. And THAT is my real love. !

Steve

 

SteveinPhilly - For the Noir course, my memory is that there were multiple weeks (following the last weekly module) in which to complete the final exam....so I don't think you'll have a problem. 

 

Regards

Rob in NOLA

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Hello everyone, my name is Renato from Canada. This is my first TCM course and love TCM! Its the only TV channel I wacth. Love all of the Noir and slapstick, Cary Grant, Jerry Lewis, Marx Bros, Lucy, three stooges and many many more. Thanks.

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SteveinPhilly - For the Noir course, my memory is that there were multiple weeks (following the last weekly module) in which to complete the final exam....so I don't think you'll have a problem. 

 

Regards

Rob in NOLA

 

Hi SteveinPhilly: Depends on when you are leaving that last week - I will have the final exam open on October 1, so you will have from 10/1 - 10/9 to take the exam - hopefully that window is big enough.

 

Best, Rich

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The Course Intro refers to Gerald Mast's book, "The Comic Mind". This book is a fantastic resourse. I still have my very well-loved copy, purchased as a reward for myself when I bought all the deadly dull, weary, flat, stale, and unprofitable textbooks for my other first-year university courses, in 19**. My parents made me get a "sensible" B.A. in English, but I got my real education by cutting classes to go to the reference library and study early comedy films.

 

Another excellent resource: Walter Kerr's "The Silent Clowns". I enjoyed it even more than Mast's book. It too, is very well-loved.

 

For film resources, go digging for alternate versions of Laurel & Hardy films, made for the foreign language market, shortly after the coming of sound. "La Vida Nocturna" is a great starting-point. (L&H speak Spanish...phonetically.) There's also an alternate English-language version of "Laughimg Gravy" with a surprisingly poignant final scene. Alas, the French version of "Pardon Us" (with Boris Karloff, who spoke fluent French, as the villain) is a lost film.

 

For real slapstick rarities, Ben Model has rescued many films, and released them under his "Accidentally Preserved" series. Most of them were digitized from films copied and sold to the general public, for viewing at home.

 

He also does a fascinating presentation about how the cameramen manipulated the onscreen movement by varying the speed at which they hand-cranked the cameras. These tricks could make objects appear impossibly heavy or light as a feather, and could show movements impossible to do in real-life---like Harold Lloyd's little "Call me Speedy" jig-step in "The Freshman".

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The Course Intro refers to Gerald Mast's book, "The Comic Mind". This book is a fantastic resourse. I still have my very well-loved copy, purchased as a reward for myself when I bought all the deadly dull, weary, flat, stale, and unprofitable textbooks for my other first-year university courses, in 19**. My parents made me get a "sensible" B.A. in English, but I got my real education by cutting classes to go to the reference library and study early comedy films.

 

Another excellent resource: Walter Kerr's "The Silent Clowns". I enjoyed it even more than Mast's book. It too, is very well-loved.

 

For film resources, go digging for alternate versions of Laurel & Hardy films, made for the foreign language market, shortly after the coming of sound. "La Vida Nocturna" is a great starting-point. (L&H speak Spanish...phonetically.) There's also an alternate English-language version of "Laughimg Gravy" with a surprisingly poignant final scene. Alas, the French version of "Pardon Us" (with Boris Karloff, who spoke fluent French, as the villain) is a lost film.

 

For real slapstick rarities, Ben Model has rescued many films, and released them under his "Accidentally Preserved" series. Most of them were digitized from films copied and sold to the general public, for viewing at home.

 

He also does a fascinating presentation about how the cameramen manipulated the onscreen movement by varying the speed at which they hand-cranked the cameras. These tricks could make objects appear impossibly heavy or light as a feather, and could show movements impossible to do in real-life---like Harold Lloyd's little "Call me Speedy" jig-step in "The Freshman".

Thanks Larynxa! I typically start my approach to comedy genres with the Mast book because I was lucky enough to take two film courses with Gerald Mast back in the 1980s and his thinking about film and genre has been a big influence on me - so I always like to pay it forward by quoting him and sharing him with other fans of films!

 

--Rich

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Dr. Rich Edwards,

 

What time will the next chapter of the weekly module be online? Thanks for reading my email.

 

BLACHEFAN

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Thanks for offering this course. I haven't done any film studies courses before but this just sort of struck my fancy. Thought I might give it a try. I've take other Canvas Network courses before and loved them. 

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At least I know I'm not the only one looking for Part II, the daily dose of doozie, etc.Is there some kind of problem or is someone standing on the hose?

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Gee, and all she does is come in and complain..???? Sorry everyone.I'm Patti, currently misplaced in New Mexico and I was thrilled to see this course being offered.So many folks with so much knowledge to share! I feel lucky to be here.

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At least I know I'm not the only one looking for Part II, the daily dose of doozie, etc.Is there some kind of problem or is someone standing on the hose?

Thanks Patti! The perfect metaphor. It probably did feel like someone standing on the hose - but hopefully no one got wet today!

 

Part 2 is up over at Canvas, but there is no daily dose today - those start officially next Monday. 

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Good afternoon, all!

Lisa here..     Just wanted to thank everyone for sharing their time, thoughts and enthusiasm!  That's about all I have.. just a love of film (Silents mostly) and 52 yrs worth of life experience.

 

When I read, "comedic strengths out of physical prowess and athletic performance." my mind lept to Jackie Gleason on the rollerskates.   So, I'm sharing that clip...   hoping you don't mind. 

 

Can't wait for the rest of the class!!!

Let's Slapstick on!!!

 

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Hello, Dontai here. I'm excited to take this course. I'm big fan of classic films, and I am looking forward to learning more about this genre. I've seen several Slapstick films and have seen their influences on movies of different categories. I want to discover its history and how you can still see it emulated in the films of today.

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Good afternoon, all!

 

Lisa here..     Just wanted to thank everyone for sharing their time, thoughts and enthusiasm!  That's about all I have.. just a love of film (Silents mostly) and 52 yrs worth of life experience.

 

When I read, "comedic strengths out of physical prowess and athletic performance." my mind lept to Jackie Gleason on the rollerskates.   So, I'm sharing that clip...   hoping you don't mind.  https://youtu.be/wYv1iSCif7w?t=16m37s

 

Can't wait for the rest of the class!!!

 

Let's Slapstick on!!!

 

 

 

This made my day... my parents loved watching this show &, at 8 or so, I couldn't appreciate both Carny & Gleason's physical genius.

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Howdy do, y'all!

 

Like a lot of you, I'm new to these online courses, but I enjoy studying film to the point where I decided to do it as a major. I was going to take the Film Noir course last year, but other circumstances came up, so this is my first class. Luckily enough, it's on a subject I absolutely love: slapstick comedy.

 

Behold, one of my favorite bits from some of the greatest comedic minds that ever lived...

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Hi Rich: I did watch the first 6 minute video anmd loved the idea of the using the highligter (I forget what it was called). I don't havbe cable - so no TCM for me (but the course will take less time that way". Great so far

 

I did contact my friend Ben Model (who was mentioned earlier and he will probably join the course and comment on Schools In periodically.

 

Happy holiday weekend to those in the US where Monday is Labor Day.

 

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Hi Rich: I did watch the first 6 minute video anmd loved the idea of the using the highligter (I forget what it was called). I don't havbe cable - so no TCM for me (but the course will take less time that way". Great so far

 

I did contact my friend Ben Model (who was mentioned earlier and he will probably join the course and comment on Schools In periodically.

 

Happy holiday weekend to those in the US where Monday is Labor Day.

 

Thanks Steve! Appreciate the kind words on the video. It was a telestrator I used to add visual diagramming to the clip. I really use that device in Episode 4, but I found it very useful for analyzing video clips. 

 

Thanks for spreading the word on the course!

 

Best, Rich

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Hello, I'm back again too. Loved the noir course and will dive into slapstick with an open mind. The folks that created drinks that went with the film noir films was brilliant! Hope there is an equal amount of fun to be had with this one. How many pies in the face did Dr. Edwards endure for that intro video?! -Cheers!

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Hi everybody! I'm brand new to taking online courses like this but I'm excited to start this course. I'm a big fan of classic comedy; Buster Keaton & The Marx Brothers are my particular favorites. I'm looking forward to learning about slapstick comedy in an academic setting and discussing it with you guys!

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