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The Cinema of Roger Vadim!


rayban
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I find the cinema of Roger Vadim to be endlessly fascinating, because it deals with the messiness of sex in such a blatant way.

 

But I haven't had the opportunity to see that many of his films.

 

The one that has always stayed with me is "The Game Is Over" with Jane Fonda, Michel Piccoli and Peter McEnery.

 

Vadim never seemed to apologize for his interest in sex.

 

Anyway, last night's "Love On A Pillow" was one of the most bizarre films that I have ever encountered in all my years of film-going.

 

Was it autobiographical?

 

For me, Vadim's most bizarre film is "Ms, Don Juan" in which Bardot is so good at lovemaking that she needs to have a submarine close by for quick getaways.

 

Also, has anybody ever noticed Vadim's fondness for good-looking or seemingly gay men?

 

I've read his book on his relationships with Bardot, Denueve and Fonda.

 

Believe it or not, it was very well-written.    

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I'll have to confess that the only Vadim film I ever saw was BARBARELLA.

 

I wasn't impressed.  Such a big deal was made when it came out, and I never got around to seeing it until years later when it was on the bill in a soon to be torn down old Detroit movie house with some EMMANUEL flick.

 

And his short appearance in the movie INTO THE NIGHT.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm very sorry I did not think to DVR PRETTY MAIDS ALL IN A ROW (1971) when it reran recently for Angie Dickinson's SUTS day. I caught it when it was part of Rock Hudon's SOTM trib a yearish ago and made note at the time that it merited re-viewing. 

"Pretty Maids All In A Row" is a very entertaining film - starring Rock Hudson in one of his more challenging roles.

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I'll have to confess that the only Vadim film I ever saw was BARBARELLA.

 

I wasn't impressed.  Such a big deal was made when it came out, and I never got around to seeing it until years later when it was on the bill in a soon to be torn down old Detroit movie house with some EMMANUEL flick.

 

And his short appearance in the movie INTO THE NIGHT.

 

 

Sepiatone

Interestingly, "Barbarella" exists primarily on the charm of Jane Fonda and John Phillip Law - and, of course. the triumphant cheesiness of Vadim's direction.

 

Also, interestingly, during the filming, Law "lived" with Vadim and Fonda.

 

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In defense of Roger Vadim, his second version of "And God Created Woman" should have made Rebecca de Mornay a major Hollywood star.

 

It also should've put her co-star, Vincent Spano, more firmly on the map.

 

 

But instead, Vadim was pretty much just raising funds for his retirement, in the 80's.

At the same time as the "Created" remake, there was also his guest-directing an episode of "Shelley Duvall's Faerie Tale Theatre", where he intentionally shot-for-shot remade the Jean Cocteau "Beauty & the Beast", with Susan Sarandon and Klaus Kinski.

 

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I wonder how Jane Fonda felt about Roger Vadim's transformation of her into an international sex symbol in "Spirits of the Dead", The Game Is Over", "Circle of Love" and "Barbarella".

 

My guess - she was not all that pleased with it.  

 

She left Roger Vadim and French cinema and returned to the United States.

 

Vadim, himself - Jane Fonda clearly inspired him - because his films with her have a certain stylistic flair.

 

But could she have toppled Brigitte Bardot from her exalted position in French cinema?

 

I doubt it, Brigitte Bardot was a sex object of the rarest kind - completely natural and alluring without even trying.     

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