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LornaHansonForbes

Welcome Home, Count Dracula.

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I read Jurassic Park well before the movie was released. Looked forward to seeing it on the big screen. Then was disappointed because the movie was such an abbreviated form of the book.

 

 

I had the exact same disappointment with Peter Benchley's 'Jaws'.

 

Not so much because of abbreviation - because of changes to certain scenes and characters. I couldn't put the novel down - read it in one sitting. But people didn't understand my lack of enthusiasm for the flick because they hadn't read it.

 

Must've happened to me a hundred times this being disappointed after reading the book first.

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Dracula (1931) -

 

For me, the lack of a film score was a highlight. The quiet was a character in itself. The only thing that bothered me were the close-ups of Dracula's face as he zoomed in for the bite. A little hammy.

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a 85-year-old film. terrific.

 

meanwhile tcm refuses to show the 2012 restored BFI print of Hammer's Dracula (1958) complete with original opening title with an embellished D and restored sunlight disintegration scene.

 

tcm are slackers!

 

their last showing of frenchman's creek dam well proved that. :D

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meanwhile tcm refuses to show the 2012 restored BFI print of Hammer's Dracula (1958) complete with original opening title with an embellished D and restored sunlight disintegration scene.

 

Not only that, they refuse to show the classic "I Married Count Dracula," starring Marie Osmond.

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thanks to everyone for all your replies, i really appreciate them.

 

As far as the source novel for DRACULA goes, it's excellent.

 

I've read it twice, and every now and then I'll listen to snippets of the audiobook on youtube. it is one of the MOST RICHLY DETAILED books I have ever read- there is SO MUCH going on in that book- references to the modern world and the present: Victorian Society, Britain's role in the world, the rapid innovations of technology; references to the the old world and the past- Eastern mythology and legend, western legend, the gothic movement...i actually made something of a mistake in reading an ANNOTATED version the second time around, i say a mistake because, while it gives background to the SCORE of references to myth and superstition and history that Stoker makes throughout the book- it also points out a lot of mistakes that an Editor should've spotted.

 

curiously, there are TWO WONDERFUL MOMENTS IN THE NOVEL that have- insofar as I know- never been truly included in any film version:

 

1. The mother of the child DRACULA has stolen and fed to his brides shows up in the courtyard of the castle, screaming for her baby back. Dracula gives a "cruel, sharp whistle" and summons a pack of wolves which devour her.

 

2. An old seaman who hangs out at the cemetery in Whitby makes the acquaintance of Lucy and Mina right before Dracula arrives in the storm ...forgive me, my mind is foggy with specifics, but he is a really interesting character and he is killed later that night when Dracula arrives on the doomed cargo ship, presumably by Dracula. there is a detail in the whole instance about how vampires can safely seek refuge in the graves of suicide victims, and it was later used in the rather goofy 2006 BBC version- although I don't think they used the Old Seaman.

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thanks to everyone for all your replies, i really appreciate them.

 

As far as the source novel for DRACULA goes, it's excellent.

 

I've read it twice, and every now and then I'll listen to snippets of the audiobook on youtube. it is one of the MOST RICHLY DETAILED books I have ever read- there is SO MUCH going on in that book- references to the modern world and the present: Victorian Society, Britain's role in the world, the rapid innovations of technology; references to the the old world and the past- Eastern mythology and legend, western legend, the gothic movement...i actually made something of a mistake in reading an ANNOTATED version the second time around, i say a mistake because, while it gives background to the SCORE of references to myth and superstition and history that Stoker makes throughout the book- it also points out a lot of mistakes that an Editor should've spotted.

 

curiously, there are TWO WONDERFUL MOMENTS IN THE NOVEL that have- insofar as I know- never been truly included in any film version:

 

1. The mother of the child DRACULA has stolen and fed to his brides shows up in the courtyard of the castle, screaming for her baby back. Dracula gives a "cruel, sharp whistle" and summons a pack of wolves which devour her.

 

2. An old seaman who hangs out at the cemetery in Whitby makes the acquaintance of Lucy and Mina right before Dracula arrives in the storm ...forgive me, my mind is foggy with specifics, but he is a really interesting character and he is killed later that night when Dracula arrives on the doomed cargo ship, presumably by Dracula. there is a detail in the whole instance about how vampires can safely seek refuge in the graves of suicide victims, and it was later used in the rather goofy 2006 BBC version- although I don't think they used the Old Seaman.

 

Where does one find the source novel?

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Where does one find the source novel?

At googlebooks ... or (gasp) a public library

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Where does one find the source novel?

 

you mean the Stoker novel?

 

it's everywhere- Barnes and Noble, books-a-million, online, the library, i think it's even a free Kindle download (books you can read on a mobile device.)

 

...one good way to "read" it is to listen to the numerous audio versions, the whole book read aloud is about 10 hours long, you can listen to various versions of it- as well as DRACULA'S GUEST, THE LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM and Stoker's other stories on YOUTUBE. (for free.)

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you mean the Stoker novel?

 

it's everywhere- Barnes and Noble, books-a-million, online, the library, i think it's even a free Kindle download (books you can read on a mobile device.)

 

...one good way to "read" it is to listen to the numerous audio versions, the whole book read aloud is about 10 hours long, you can listen to various versions of it- as well as DRACULA'S GUEST, THE LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM and Stoker's other stories on YOUTUBE. (for free.)

 

Yes, classic books can be had on the cheap.   I learned this while in Italy when staying at my in-laws.    If one wanted to purchase a book written in the last 20 or so years it would cost 20 - 30 Euros.    But since the classics are in the public domain,  they would cost 3 - 4 Euros and they had a very wide selection because Italians trying to learn English are told to read classic English novels.

 

The company Collins Classic was the publisher.   This is how I discovered F. Scott Fitzgerald.      

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you mean the Stoker novel?

 

it's everywhere- Barnes and Noble, books-a-million, online, the library, i think it's even a free Kindle download (books you can read on a mobile device.)

 

...one good way to "read" it is to listen to the numerous audio versions, the whole book read aloud is about 10 hours long, you can listen to various versions of it- as well as DRACULA'S GUEST, THE LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM and Stoker's other stories on YOUTUBE. (for free.)

 

You're speaking of the original novel? I have it. I just haven't read it in ages. I thought you were talking about something else.

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You're speaking of the original novel? I have it. I just haven't read it in ages. I thought you were talking about something else.

 

nope. just the Stoker book...although there is at least one (and maybe more) ANNOTATED EDITION DRACULA, which is on one hand very informative and, on the other, a little bit of a joykiller as it points out a lot of mistakes Stoker made (plot holes, anachronisms, etc.)

 

still worth reading if you find it online or at the library.

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PS- FYI, if anyone here ever wants to resurrect a thread you posted here from a while back, you can search the thread title under google with your user name and it'll come up!

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For consideration in 2018 and later, it would be nice to see a double feature of "Nosferatu" (1922) and "Shadow of the Vampire" (2000).  "Shadow..." is about Murnau's filming of Nosferatu, and the possible events on the set.  Willem Dafoe was nominated for Best Supporting Actor as Count Orlok.

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Willem Dafoe was nominated for Best Supporting Actor as Count Orlok.

And if I'm not mistaken, Dafoe has the distinction of being the only actor thus far to be Oscar-nominated for playing a vampire!

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1:

 

TCM PRIMETIME - WHAT'S ON TONIGHT: MONSTER OF THE MONTH: MONSTER OF THE MONTH: DRACULA
8:00 PM
horror
Dracula (1931)
 
 
 
 
9:30 PM
drama
 
 
 
 
11:00 PM
horror
 
 
 
 
12:30 AM
silent
Nosferatu (1922)

 

that 3rd one with louise allbritton is a good one...

 

 

"don't use that word, frank. we don't like it."

782a57174a9f761d3b1f27cdfe966fe8.jpg

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And if I'm not mistaken, Dafoe has the distinction of being the only actor thus far to be Oscar-nominated for playing a vampire!

I'm pretty sure you're right...

 

Although, whenever anyone brings up SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE, I cannot help but mention that I can think of no better concept or story for a movie that was rendered more poorly by the people who made it. It is an absolutely brilliant idea that has a lot to say about horror movies, vampires, art, and filmmaking and it walks a very fine line between comedy and horror...unfortunately it is one of the slowest, most poorly directed, horribly paced films I've seen.

 

One of these days, I'm hoping to remake by some people who actually know what the hell they're doing goes down.

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And as an aside, just because I like to drop whatever Hollywood gossip I can whenever I can, I mentioned this fact to a screenwriter I was dating YEARS AGO and he mentioned that he was friends with the guy who wrote SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE, and that if he heard me say that he would probably buy me a beer and pat me on the back.

 

Apparently he haaaaaaaaaated what the director did with his script.

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Apparently he haaaaaaaaaated what the director did with his script.

 

Not exactly a rare occurrence.

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As glorious as the restoration they did was, I kind of wish Universal had left the Swan Lake music in the introduction alone. They fixed that part where it skips and then speeds up and the music is kind of garbled and odd sounding, and I've always loved it.

 

It kind of came off of spooky. Now it's too smooth.

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They are most definitely showing the restored print

 

please everyone stick around for the first 15 minutes. Ever since the restoration they're all sorts of wonderful details about the castle sets I noticed that eluded me before because the print quality was so bad.

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