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I've noticed this Friday is an all day tribute to the Falcon series. Eleven films in all. I'm recording all of them to watch at my leisure. (I've probably seen most of them, but cant remember which ones I've seen and which ones I havent). A fun day.

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I've noticed this Friday is an all day tribute to the Falcon series. Eleven films in all. I'm recording all of them to watch at my leisure. (I've probably seen most of them, but cant remember which ones I've seen and which ones I havent). A fun day.

You betcha! I can't wait.

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I've noticed this Friday is an all day tribute to the Falcon series. Eleven films in all. I'm recording all of them to watch at my leisure. (I've probably seen most of them, but cant remember which ones I've seen and which ones I havent). A fun day.

 

http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/112661-sep-2-the-falcons-all-11/

 

Yes, there was another discussion about this already, plus I mentioned it in the George Sanders thread. All of the RKO Falcon movies, except two (the last two) are being broadcast. 

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http://forums.tcm.com/index.php?/topic/112661-sep-2-the-falcons-all-11/

 

Yes, there was another discussion about this already, plus I mentioned it in the George Sanders thread. All of the RKO Falcon movies, except two (the last two) are being broadcast. 

TB;  I'll be at the TV as well...a day of George...how wonderful is life!!!!

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I've noticed this Friday is an all day tribute to the Falcon series. Eleven films in all. I'm recording all of them to watch at my leisure. (I've probably seen most of them, but cant remember which ones I've seen and which ones I havent). A fun day.

I posted something about this a couple of weeks ago.  Hopefully a lot of people will catch some of these shows.  They are all about 60 minutes or so and very entertaining.  Great to have on hand when you are looking for something to watch for an hour or so and do not want to watch a regular length movie.

My favorites are the Falcon....In Mexico, Out West, In Hollywood and The Falcon and the Co-Eds.

For those interested, there are two DVD sets available.  Good quality, but no extras.

George Sanders is in the first few, but his actual brother, Tom Conway, takes over in The Falcon's Brother.

George was probably the better actor, but in this series I think Tom did just as well.  Maybe it is because they are so much alike in appearance and some mannerisms.

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Just noticed that The Falcon and the Co-Eds has three stars.  The rest are rated two.

I don't give a toss about the stars...George is a four star in my book and who doesn't like a double dose of George when Tom's in the picture too.   I am ready for today...found a household chore I am able to accomplish while OD'ing on George...ironing.  What a way to spend the day. 

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I don't give a toss about the stars...George is a four star in my book and who doesn't like a double dose of George when Tom's in the picture too.   I am ready for today...found a household chore I am able to accomplish while OD'ing on George...ironing.  What a way to spend the day. 

 

Sounds like a sweet deal-- fresh pressed George and fresh pressed shirts.

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Are these cable guide ratings? Or Maltin's opinions?

Comes up on the Charter Cable info description of the movies.  Doesn't really matter to me, just found it interesting.  And the Co-Eds probably is somewhat better than the others.

Incidentally, this one not being shown, but Jane Greer had a singing role in The Falcon's Alibi.

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I truly wish the web moderator would report on all the positive posts about George and relay information to the programmers about the amount of interest shown by all of us in promoting George as a SUTS or SOTM.  If he has time to star the last name of the radio show Boston **** as I suppose he found it offensive then he could take the time to forward our desires to the programmers. 

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Comes up on the Charter Cable info description of the movies.  Doesn't really matter to me, just found it interesting.  And the Co-Eds probably is somewhat better than the others.

Incidentally, this one not being shown, but Jane Greer had a singing role in The Falcon's Alibi.

 

 

Oh, I think I saw that one with Jane Greer! So that one's not being shown? Too bad!

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Comes up on the Charter Cable info description of the movies.  Doesn't really matter to me, just found it interesting.  And the Co-Eds probably is somewhat better than the others. 

 

I often wonder who determines what gets two stars or three stars on the cable guides. They don't have half stars the way Maltin does. 

 

I think the Falcon movie that was recycled as MURDER, MY SWEET usually gets the highest marks from critics. It's THE FALCON TAKES OVER.

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I often wonder who determines what gets two stars or three stars on the cable guides. They don't have half stars the way Maltin does. 

 

I think the Falcon movie that was recycled as MURDER, MY SWEET usually gets the highest marks from critics. It's THE FALCON TAKES OVER.

The Falcon Takes Over was based on Raymond Chandler's Farewell My Lovely and I believe first movie.  I much prefer the 1975 movie with Robert Mitchum.

Just watched The Falcon Strikes Back and IMO, Harriett Hillard (Nelson) was much better than in her role as TV's Harriett Nelson.

They were studio productions, but interesting how many actors appear in so many of them.  One might have a very minor role in one and then a fairly major one in the next one.

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The Falcon Takes Over was based on Raymond Chandler's Farewell My Lovely and I believe first movie.  I much prefer the 1975 movie with Robert Mitchum.

Just watched The Falcon Strikes Back and IMO, Harriett Hillard (Nelson) was much better than in her role as TV's Harriett Nelson.

They were studio productions, but interesting how many actors appear in so many of them.  One might have a very minor role in one and then a fairly major one in the next one.

 

And of course, they probably had no idea we'd be analyzing the casting all these years later. These actors were just trying to stay busy and put food on the table.

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And of course, they probably had no idea we'd be analyzing the casting all these years later. These actors were just trying to stay busy and put food on the table.

I often wonder about the actors in many of these old movies as to what kind of lives they lived considering how small their parts were.  And how long they stayed with it.

Also, all those dancers in the musicals and Busby Berkeley type movies.  Can't think there would be enough work for all of them on a very consistent basis, especially as they got older.

There are probably lots and lots of books about them, but not that interested.

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I often wonder about the actors in many of these old movies as to what kind of lives they lived considering how small their parts were.  And how long they stayed with it.

Also, all those dancers in the musicals and Busby Berkeley type movies.  Can't think there would be enough work for all of them on a very consistent basis, especially as they got older.

There are probably lots and lots of books about them, but not that interested.

 

Obviously, there were people who earned big money...but yes, I think the majority of them eked out a working class existence at the studios. 

 

I was researching the career of a character actress I'm writing a piece about. She made 100 films between 1930 and 1950. In most of them, she has just one or two scenes. She probably did her part on set in a day, then she was on to the next movie. It wasn't because she and others like her were trying to rack up all these credits; mostly, it was because they were trying to stay gainfully employed.

 

Even adjusting for inflation, the average salary for the "stock company" players would have been rather modest; they were not living it up in Hollywood. It would make a good book if someone examined the working-class actors in classic movies, instead of the stars who had jewels and Rolls Royces and married princes. For every Grace Kelly, there's a Mary Gordon or a Maude Eburne.

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I often wonder about the life of a character actor like William Schallert.

 

He worked consistently over the years in films, of course, and in TV.

 

For the most part, he usually appeared in small roles like a doctor in "The Incredible Shrinking Man" or a reporter in "Written On The Wind".

 

How did he get work?

 

Did he answer casting calls at the various studios?

 

Would he have to audition?

 

Was he sometimes invited to play one of his small roles?

 

Was it ever - "We could get Bill Schallert for this one?"

 

If he had a family, I am sure that he was a good provider.

 

Love the man, I always get a kick when I spot him in anything.

 

Maybe TopBilled will write a book about him - and other said actors - like Charles Lane - who were gainfully employed throughout the decades.   

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I often wonder about the life of a character actor like William Schallert.

 

Maybe TopBilled will write a book about him - and other said actors - like Charles Lane - who were gainfully employed throughout the decades.   

 

I wish somebody would.  Since we rarely went to movies when I was a child, these people were my acting heroes(ines).  They always seemed to be working which told me the powers that be thought them talented; I agreed.  After seeing one and putting a face to a name I could watch for them knowing I'd see at least one performance on the show.

 

This is still happening.  When I watched Judgment at Nuremburg  a few weeks ago I was impressed by the actor who played the third judge with Spencer Tracy and Ray Teal.  He then started turning up in other films and vintage TV shows-always delivering good work-and I learned his name was Allan Baxter.  This is why I get such a kick out some of them finally getting their due with an Oscar or Emmy nominated role as Michael Lerner did in Barton Fink.        

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And of course, they probably had no idea we'd be analyzing the casting all these years later. These actors were just trying to stay busy and put food on the table.

For any of those who are really interested in the life and times of Hollywood Extras, there is a great book on the subject by the author Anthony Slide.  He also wrote a great book on the history of English actors and how they moved between Hollywood and England.  The title of the book is the HOLLYWOOD UNKNOWNS.  Once I finished it I now spend a great amount of my time watching the scenes with large numbers of extras knowing what they had to go through to get a job.  Really very interesting.  There are a large number of books on the topic but Anthony Slide seems to have a practical historical well researched presentation on the topic.  I found the same true of his book about the English actors as well. 

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