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Alternate Titles


Ray Faiola
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Lots of films have alternate titles, sometimes for reissue, sometimes for international reasons.  Universal's THE IMPOSTOR was released to television as STRANGE CONFESSION; PASSPORT TO HEAVEN was filmed as CAPTAIN FROM KOPENICK and ultimately released theatrically as I WAS A CRIMINAL.

 

Here is the main title sequence from the UK version of THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME:

 

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Well Ray, I've heard that the sequel to THE HUSTLER they made '86 starring little Tommy Cruise and Paul Newman was retitled THE COLOUR OF MONEY for those limeys over there.

 

(...but I really don't know if that's true or not, so don't quote me on this)

 

;)

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Bicycle Thieves (UK)...The Bicycle Thief (US)

 

(...the UK title is actually the more correct translation of De Sica's masterwork "Ladri di biciclette", as the Italian word "ladri" is the plural of "thief" in English...singular of "ladri" in Italian is "ladro")

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Although we now call the film Ace In The Hole, it was actually released as The Big Carnival. I actually once saw Billy Wilder refer to it under that title in an interview.

 

Today it's cited under the tabloidish title I Married A Communist, as it was previewed, but its actual release title was much blander: The Woman On Pier 13.

 

My vote for the all-time greatest title change goes to the British WWII film Tomorrow We Live, which was changed in the US to At Dawn We Die.

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Some films get an alternate title when they are re-released but the original title is what is known today.

 

E.g.  Too Late for Tears was re-released 6 years after the original release in 1949 as Killer Bait.

 

I wonder how many people mistakenly went to the theater and saw the film in 1955 and said 'hey,  I have already seen this!'.

 

 

 

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Three films with four or more alternate titles;

 

"Desire Me" (1947)--AKA "A Woman of My Own", "As You Desire Me", "Beloved Stranger", "Carl and Anna", "Great Temptation", "Sacred and Profane", "The Intruder".

 

"The Tomb of Ligeia" (1965)--AKA "House At The End of The World", "Ligeia", "The Last Tomb of Ligeia", "Tomb of The Cat".

 

"Tam Lin" (1971)--AKA "Games and Toys", "The Ballad of Tam Lin", "The Devil's Widow", "The Devil's Woman", "Tom Lynn", "Toys".

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Originally released in Italy as 'Quiemada' (1969), Gillo (The Battle of Algiers) Pontecorvo's film was released almost a year later to North America as 'Burn!'.

 

A modest hit, but an overall box office disappointment for Pontecorvo.

 

After Brando won the Academy Award in early '73, it was decided to try again and the movie was re-released under the title 'The Mercenary'. That is the title currently showing at IMDb.

 

But Brando enthusiasts still know it chiefly as 'Burn!'. That's the title on my library's DVD.

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I WAKE UP SCREAMING had the working title of HOT SPOT, but Darryl Zanuck, thought that it, along with star Betty Grable, would seem like a musical, instead of the early noir that it was, so it was changed. Grable even sang a title tune, "Hot Spot", but it was deleted along with the title change; the footage survives as an extra on the dvd.

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