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The Story of Film: An Odyssey by Mark Cousins


ressydm
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TCM ran the series in 2011 (I think)

 

http://www.tcm.com/storyoffilm/overview.html

 

I loved it ! :) (mostly for the films they ran rather than for Cousins' remarks)

 

& it's on you tube also...

 

 

So, Mr.6? Are you saying?...you didn't care for?...Mr. Cousins' narration?

 

Might this be?...because?...his little Irish lilt?...wore thin?...after about?...twenty minutes or so? And that maybe?...he might have been?...best advised?...to have hired a professional narrator?...to speak his written words?...for him? 

 

(...just a guess here, of course) ;)

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So, Mr.6? Are you saying?...you didn't care for?...Mr. Cousins' narration?

 

Might this be?...because?...his little Irish lilt?...wore thin?...after about?...twenty minutes or so? And that maybe?...he might have been?...best advised?...to have hired a professional narrator?...to speak his written words?...for him? 

 

(...just a guess here, of course) ;)

 

Ok. That post alone must warrant at least one warning point (I'd give you five).

 

OH no! My quoting it exposes me to the same penalty..! 

VaiNIJl.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

History; historical products (books, movies, etc) --all of that is basically dead. The concept is completely quashed in a world where people stare into plastic screens for every idea. No one even grasps anymore, the fact that things are not instantaneous; or that there wasn't a picture of it previously available; or that something took time to test; or that a product or a material was ever unknown or unfamiliar. The notion that something ever might not have arrived safely in your hands on-demand; or needed effort or experimentation to produce; is entirely lost lately.

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On 10/12/2018 at 2:19 AM, Sgt_Markoff said:

History; historical products (books, movies, etc) --all of that is basically dead. The concept is completely quashed in a world where people stare into plastic screens for every idea. No one even grasps anymore, the fact that things are not instantaneous; or that there wasn't a picture of it previously available; or that something took time to test; or that a product or a material was ever unknown or unfamiliar. The notion that something ever might not have arrived safely in your hands on-demand; or needed effort or experimentation to produce; is entirely lost lately.

Have you seen The Story of Film?     TCM did run it 5 years back and I found it very interesting.   Some people felt the host (Cousins) was anti Hollywood \ American films,   but I didn't get that impression.    Yea,  he did focus on foreign cinema,  but that was what I found most interesting since I lacked knowledge in that area.    So this series motivated me to seek out films beyond the American studio-era.   (which leads to a very common debate:  how much of TCM's programming should be set aside for NON American studio-era films). 

 

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3 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Have you seen The Story of Film?     TCM did run it 5 years back and I found it very interesting.   Some people felt the host (Cousins) was anti Hollywood \ American films,   but I didn't get that impression.    Yea,  he did focus on foreign cinema,  but that was what I found most interesting since I lacked knowledge in that area.    So this series motivated me to seek out films beyond the American studio-era.   (which leads to a very common debate:  how much of TCM's programming should be set aside for NON American studio-era films). 

 

I think Cousins was a bit biased against Hollywood films in that documentary. He seemed to imply that the Studio era was all just cookie cutter genre movies and Europe was all deep philosophical films and of course, we know that is not the case. I also didn't like how he included out of context clips all over the place, like clips from the silent era in an episode on 40s films and clips of 80s movies in an episode on the 60s. I do however like the effort he put into it with interviewing actors, directors, filmmakers, etc. from all over the globe! 

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I apologize for being a 'debbie-downer' above but I regularly get dispirited by the mindlessness of the "always on" digital culture. If I wasn't currently residing among a horde of 23 million digital dingbats in the New York metro area perhaps it wouldn't gnaw at me so much.

I mentioned the time I was in a bar and discovered that the 28-yr-old dude next to me didn't know the name David Carradine. Right? That kind of thing. Or, people not knowing when a song or movie release is clearly a remake of an existing classic. College kids hiring paper-writing services online, to write term papers for them. Everyone vapidly blinking their eyes like goldfish.

In any other era I might sound like a Tiresias but there's just never been anything like the transformation-to-dumbness brought about by this glut of digital toys. Old arguments that technology is benign just don't hold water anymore.

Look at this article for instance (one of hundreds similar):

https://tinyurl.com/y95jvzub

or this:

https://tinyurl.com/y9epruvb

To me, this kind of thing represents a silent disaster in contemporary culture.

Question: is there a thread on this forum for cinema books?

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