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Title Cards


Richard Kimble
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Actually the sepiatone segments in The Wizard of Oz were originally B&W, including the title cards, so I changed it to that on purpose. I also remember when I first saw the movie when I was very young, those segments were still in B&W until they changed it a few years later.

 

Disregard that last statement...

 

Now, more title cards...

 

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Actually the sepiatone segments in The Wizard of Oz were originally B&W, including the title cards, so I changed it to that on purpose. I also remember when I first saw the movie when I was very young, those segments were still in B&W until they changed it a few years later.

 

http://www.thegeektwins.com/2010/08/10-crazy-but-true-facts-about-wizard-of.html

 

Oz is Not in Black and White - The opening and ending to The Wizard of Oz were not originally filmed in black and white. They were filmed on Sepia Tone film, which gave it more of a brownish tint. However, from 1949, all the prints shown of Oz were in black and white. The movie wasn't restored to the original sepia tones until a 50th Anniversary special-edition videocassette was released in 1989.
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Hey! I gotta question here for you folks, and which was spurred by these title cards.

 

Does anybody know why and/or how the practice started of showing the copyright dates of films in Roman numerals?

 

(...one slightly used chariot goes to the first person who gives me a reasonable answer to this...you probably won't want it, though...the wheels are shot and the hook-up thingy that goes to the horses is missing)

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Hey! I gotta question here for you folks, and which was spurred by these title cards.

 

Does anybody know why and/or how the practice started of showing the copyright dates of films in Roman numerals?

 

(...one slightly used chariot goes to the first person who gives me a reasonable answer to this...you probably won't want it, though...the wheels are shot and the hook-up thingy that goes to the horses is missing)

Someone asked this on the site Stack Exchange, and the best answer would be one of two things, according to Imponderables: The Solution to the Mysteries of Everyday Life by David Feldman:

 

1. Deception theory: to "make it difficult for viewers to determine how old the show/film is", the reason being the older the date, the "staler" the material may seem to the audience.

 

2. Inertia theory: That's just the way it's always been done.

 

I'd like that Chariot now, so I can pretend I'm Charlton Heston in Ben-Hurplease.

 

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