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Beautiful GWTW image


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Well ND, considering that BOTH the deceased painter Thomas Kinkade's overall work(and whose work THIS is, btw) AND the movie in which Kinkade attempts to depict a scene from here are often described as "overtly kitschy and commercialized fantasy pieces containing little resemblance to reality", I suppose I CAN at least see and appreciate the "continuity factor" present here, anyway.

 

(...but hey, as they say, "I may know nothing about art, but I DO know what I like", RIGHT?!) ;)

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Well ND, considering that BOTH the deceased painter Thomas Kinkade's overall work(and whose work THIS is, btw) AND the movie in which Kinkade attempts to depict a scene from here are often described as "overtly kitschy and commercialized fantasy pieces containing little resemblance to reality", I suppose I can AT LEAST see the "continuity factor" present here, anyway.

 

(...but hey, as they say, "I may know nothing about art, but I DO know what I like", RIGHT?!) ;)

 

Yea,  overtly kitschy.    Also what is the cowardly lion doing in the middle of the painting?   :lol:

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It LOOKS like the sort of thing that was sold on 1-800 offers back in the late 80's when Citizen Turner still owned MGM personally (and had his own personal Rosebud-like obsession with GWTW), and went on characteristically tacky mass-marketing campaigns for the MGM Holy Trinity--GWTW, Oz and Singin' in the Rain.  Two of which conveniently happened to be celebrating marketable 50th anniversaries in '89-'90.

 

Yep, I remember that GWTW book/miniseries sequel, that Oz Saturday morning series, and that cartoon-cat movie that was supposed to sell Singin' to kids.  

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Okay, and now after looking at Mr. Kinkade's painting here again, for some weird reason(although I THINK I really know why) I was reminded of the beginning of this classic 1944 Tex Avery cartoon featuring the sorely underutilized Screwball Squirrel...

 

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I was doing an image search yesterday on google for antebellum interior decors and came across some images I liked especially this one, an oil painting, I think.

 

makes a beautiful wallpaper on my monitor.

 

9vk0uv.jpg

 

So there is something in today's universe that you actually. Very good !

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I was doing an image search yesterday on google for antebellum interior decors and came across some images I liked especially this one, an oil painting, I think.

 

makes a beautiful wallpaper on my monitor.

 

9vk0uv.jpg

Well, this is a very Smaltzy-kitschy artsy-craftsy image. But putting that aside - - you missed all the people that made it possible--

 

All those black people who were owned by all those white people who had enslaved them to do all the dirty work to make this pretty picture possible.

 

So this could go for one movie like gwtw or another movie like The Invisible People.

 

No realistic Antebellum picture would be complete without slaves.

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Well, this is a very Smaltzy-kitschy artsy-craftsy image. But putting that aside - - you missed all the people that made it possible--

 

All those black people who were owned by all those white people who had enslaved them to do all the dirty work to make this pretty picture possible.

 

So this could go for one movie like gwtw or another movie like The Invisible People.

 

No realistic Antebellum picture would be complete without slaves.

 

Obviously, the artist was not trying for realism, but a romantic idyll. 

 

And this is probably how most people remember GONE WITH THE WIND-- as a love story with Scarlett & Rhett and not much else.

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Obviously Peggy Mitchell's novel is nothing but a romantic love story

 

But unfortunately Through The Years due to maybe poor public education - - many people are seeing it as a realistic history of the Civil War.

 

For that reason whenever we discuss gwtw we gotta be very clear about what we're talking about and what we mean.

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Obviously Peggy Mitchell's novel is nothing but a romantic love story

 

But unfortunately Through The Years due to maybe poor public education - - many people are seeing it as a realistic history of the Civil War.

 

For that reason whenever we discuss gwtw we gotta be very clear about what we're talking about and what we mean.

I was merely alluding to what I consider a very beautiful picture based on the film and you gotta admit, hattie mcdaniel is in there. :lol:

 

I myself have no personal romanticisn for slavery whatsoever but whatta beautiful picture. there's a rainbow in the sky over the mansion indicating that rhett and scarlett are taking a stroll right after a pleasant georgia summer rain. :D

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Obviously Peggy Mitchell's novel is nothing but a romantic love story

 

About two years ago I purchased the set for Hearts Afire, a sitcom starring John Ritter & Markie Post. It was produced from 1992 to 1995, not long after the 50th anniversary of GONE WITH THE WIND. Linda Bloodworth, the show's creator and headwriter, is a southern gal and an obvious Mitchell admirer. She wrote an episode where Post's character buys one of those prized Scarlett & Rhett plates (the ornamental kind you hang on the wall). I'd forgotten about those-- they were advertised on late-night commercials for a long time and probably sold millions. I'm sure they're collector's items now and worth a lot.

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Obviously, the artist was not trying for realism, but a romantic idyll. 

 

And this is probably how most people remember GONE WITH THE WIND-- as a love story with Scarlett & Rhett and not much else.

 

If people remember GWTW as a love story they need to seek professional help.     There is only one scene where the two pretend to show that type of affection as seen in the painting and that is when they are walking their child.    Rhett does this just to show off and appear respectable and Scarlett clearly doesn't wish to be there and she has little to no affection for Rhett.

 

The picture is phony just like the so called love story between these two.

Edited by jamesjazzguitar
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If people remember GWTW as a love story they need to seek professional help.     There is only one scene where the two pretend to show that type of affection and that is when they are walking their child.    Rhett does this just to show off and appear respectable and Scarlett clearly doesn't wish to be there and she has little to no affection for Rhett.

 

The picture is phony just like the so called love story between these two.

 

So tell us how you really feel, James! LOL

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If people remember GWTW as a love story they need to seek professional help.     There is only one scene where the two pretend to show that type of affection as seen in the painting and that is when they are walking their child.    Rhett does this just to show off and appear respectable and Scarlett clearly doesn't wish to be there and she has little to no affection for Rhett.

 

The picture is phony just like the so called love story between these two.

 

I especially love that romantic climax where Rhett says he doesn't give a dam (sic) and walks out on her. If that isn't love then , what is ?  :P 

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I especially love that romantic climax where Rhett says he doesn't give a dam (sic) and walks out on her. If that isn't love then , what is ?  :P

 

I think that was my favorite scene. Scarlett drove me nuts. She’s too high maintenance for me to like. LOL! Before I saw GWTW, I was told it was an epic love story between Scarlett and Rhett with the Civil War as a backdrop. While I like the movie and found it very visually stunning, I didn’t see an epic love story. I did see what you don’t do to someone you supposedly love.

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I think that was my favorite scene. Scarlett drove me nuts. She’s too high maintenance for me to like. LOL! Before I saw GWTW, I was told it was an epic love story between Scarlett and Rhett with the Civil War as a backdrop. While I like the movie and found it very visually stunning, I didn’t see an epic love story. I did see what you don’t do to someone you supposedly love.

 

You have a fan just for this post (especially if you're a 'miss').    

 

Scarlett never loved Rhett;  even at the end when she wishes he wasn't going to leave it was only because she needed him to advance her own selfish goals.   As the saying goes: what's love have to do with it!   In the case of Scarlett nothing.    

 

Maybe she loved Ashley but that was a school girl type crush which I don't define as love.      

 

I do enjoy the film because it is very well produced with fine acting,  visuals,  and the civil war story.    

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You have a fan just for this post (especially if you're a 'miss').    

 

Scarlett never loved Rhett;  even at the end when she wishes he wasn't going to leave it was only because she needed him to advance her own selfish goals.   As the saying goes: what's love have to do with it!   In the case of Scarlett nothing.    

 

Maybe she loved Ashley but that was a school girl type crush which I don't define as love.      

 

I do enjoy the film because it is very well produced with fine acting,  visuals,  and the civil war story.    

 

Definitely a Miss. :)

 

I didn’t think Scarlett loved Ashley either. I saw her so call love and pursuit of Ashley as wanting something she couldn’t have. I imagine if she had won Ashley’s heart she would’ve grown bored with him or unfortunately cause his death as she did with one of her other husbands

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