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Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose of Doozy #5: Cleaning Up His Act: Charley Chase

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Hi Everyone,


 


The fifth Daily Dose of Doozy will arrive in your email inboxes Monday morning, September 12, 2016. 


 


The second week of Doozies will focus on four clips from the "talkies" of the 1930s and 1940s.


 


If you didn't receive this Daily Dose, it will be archived starting at noon Mountain time on September 12, 2016, here at the Canvas course site: https://learn.canvas...y-dose-of-doozy


 


You will need to be enrolled in the Painfully Funny course to view the archive link. 


 


Begin your discussions!


 


Thanks! 


 


Dr. Rich Edwards


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Although the slapstick here was far more subtle, I’d hate to go so far as to call it far more sophisticated. So much of the shaving gag bits were echoes from the past (the bit using the suit jacket as a mirror may have been new, but it didn’t hold water, especially since there were so many better, more realistic mirrored surfaces around, at least as far as I could tell; but, perhaps this was a reference to some material like sharkskin that was newly popular at the time?). Exaggeration, physicality, repetition, “make believe” (especially compared with the earlier driving scene) and even the “violence” with the possible exception of the old squirting flower were all very slight. Chase was certainly exasperated, especially with the squirting flower, so much so that I think he was close to exasperating the audience before finally getting that squirt in his pie hole. I think the music hit the mark, however, and the sound quality, particularly in not adding any artificial effects but in picking up the real sounds well, was perfect.

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This is another of those films that Canadian viewers won't see on TCM, due to broadcast rights issues.

 

However, it is on YouTube, albeit not a very good copy.

 

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Although the slapstick here was far more subtle, I’d hate to go so far as to call it far more sophisticated. So much of the shaving gag bits were echoes from the past (the bit using the suit jacket as a mirror may have been new, but it didn’t hold water, especially since there were so many better, more realistic mirrored surfaces around, at least as far as I could tell; but, perhaps this was a reference to some material like sharkskin that was newly popular at the time?). Exaggeration, physicality, repetition, “make believe” (especially compared with the earlier driving scene) and even the “violence” with the possible exception of the old squirting flower were all very slight. Chase was certainly exasperated, especially with the squirting flower, so much so that I think he was close to exasperating the audience before finally getting that squirt in his pie hole. I think the music hit the mark, however, and the sound quality, particularly in not adding any artificial effects but in picking up the real sounds well, was perfect.

This film, like most from the Hal Roach Studio in that era, used music from the Roach stock library, composed by Leroy Shield (though Marvin Hatley usually got the onscreen credit). The Beau Hunks orchestra has recorded several albums of this original music, played on vintage instruments).

 

Here's an article about the original music: http://blog.seattlepi.com/movielady/2012/02/19/saving-the-music-of-laurel-hardy-and-our-gang/

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Although the slapstick here was far more subtle, I’d hate to go so far as to call it far more sophisticated. So much of the shaving gag bits were echoes from the past (the bit using the suit jacket as a mirror may have been new, but it didn’t hold water, especially since there were so many better, more realistic mirrored surfaces around, at least as far as I could tell; but, perhaps this was a reference to some material like sharkskin that was newly popular at the time?). Exaggeration, physicality, repetition, “make believe” (especially compared with the earlier driving scene) and even the “violence” with the possible exception of the old squirting flower were all very slight. Chase was certainly exasperated, especially with the squirting flower, so much so that I think he was close to exasperating the audience before finally getting that squirt in his pie hole. I think the music hit the mark, however, and the sound quality, particularly in not adding any artificial effects but in picking up the real sounds well, was perfect.

I agree. I feel Melies had been doing the "jacket as a mirror" for three decades prior.

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(Full disclosure - huge Charley Chase fan.  Thank you for providing this study of his work.)

 

1.  In this clip, and in many of Chase's sound films, it's like his comedy is wearing a harness.  There is little exaggeration in his performance, the physicality is limited-to-non-existent and there is little of the make believe.  That said, the perfume machine gag is repetitive and probably painful, but not to the extent of Keaton with his props.  All of this was probably due to the limitations of the early sound recording equipment.  Chase would have had to have been close to the microphone and consequently the camera couldn't dolly or get very wide during a dialogue scene.

 

2.  Yes, the viewer gets the impression that his greatest emotion is exasperation.  Chase's comedy is probably the closest to being a precursor to the television sitcom.  He often reminds me of Dick Van Dyke on his eponymous TV show.  Van Dyke's favourite comedian is Stan Laurel, but one can see that on his TV show, he was more Chase than Laurel.  One can also see where John Cleese might have found some of Basil Fawlty's character.

 

3.  The music is strictly used to provide background music of the party/dance hall and has no impact on the gags.  It's nice to hear the sound effect for the squirting perfume machine and the man reading the paper adds background to the shaving sequence, but the gags aren't reliant on sound.  Again, this is all due to the limitations of sound recording and the fact that sound mixing didn't start to happen until about 1933.

 

Chase shone in his silent films - a wonderful example is Movie Night.  Try to check them out. 

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(Full disclosure - huge Charley Chase fan. Thank you for providing this study of his work.)

 

1. In this clip, and in many of Chase's sound films, it's like his comedy is wearing a harness. There is little exaggeration in his performance, the physicality is limited-to-non-existent and there is little of the make believe. That said, the perfume machine gag is repetitive and probably painful, but not to the extent of Keaton with his props. All of this was probably due to the limitations of the early sound recording equipment. Chase would have had to have been close to the microphone and consequently the camera couldn't dolly or get very wide during a dialogue scene.

 

2. Yes, the viewer gets the impression that his greatest emotion is exasperation. Chase's comedy is probably the closest to being a precursor to the television sitcom. He often reminds me of Dick Van Dyke on his eponymous TV show. Van Dyke's favourite comedian is Stan Laurel, but one can see that on his TV show, he was more Chase than Laurel. One can also see where John Cleese might have found some of Basil Fawlty's character.

 

3. The music is strictly used to provide background music of the party/dance hall and has no impact on the gags. It's nice to hear the sound effect for the squirting perfume machine and the man reading the paper adds background to the shaving sequence, but the gags aren't reliant on sound. Again, this is all due to the limitations of sound recording and the fact that sound mixing didn't start to happen until about 1933.

 

Chase shone in his silent films - a wonderful example is Movie Night. Try to check them out.

I didn't see it while watching the clip that I agree he is very much like Dick Van Dyke. His humor while meeting all the criteria is much more subtle and realistic except as mentioned before using the jacket as a mirror.

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I had not heard of Charley Chase prior to this Doozy.  The element of slapstick for me was the water shooting into his mouth, and of course, missing the first several times.  I found that his faces, and that of Harold Lloyd's, were not as funny as those of Chaplin and Keaton.  That's just a personal opinion but the latter two made me laugh out loud, here at home by myself.  Looking forward to more Doozies.

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1.     How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

In The Pip From Pittsburgh the actions of Charley Chase are exaggerated, physical, repetitive and make believe yet to a much lesser degree than the silent predecessors we viewed previously and completely gone is the degree of painful and violent actions that dominated the earlier films. 

 

2.     Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?"

 

The film clip most definitely confirms Gerald Mast’s description of Charley Chase being a character of domesticated exasperation.  He seems to be an everyman who is constantly a victim of circumstances beyond his control and his struggle to endure with minimum consequences.  Charley also breaks the “fourth wall” while dealing with the fragrance dispenser to display his exasperation directly to the audience. 

 

3.     As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

I’m sure the audiences of the day were “wowed” by the new technology of sound and was demonstrated well in the scene where Charley ask a character to read a newspaper article out loud while Charley performed the physical actions of shaving.  You will also note that there is music playing throughout this entire clip and even during the sequences with dialog. The filmmakers no doubt felt this a necessary and convenient way to utilize synchronous sound over the use of a live orchestra, organ or piano accompaniment.       

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I think they did a nice job with the sound for an early effort. While the music was undoubtedly a stock material, they picked a selection that seemed calm and soothing. This made for a nice dichotomy that played against Chase's actions of desperation and " exasperation". I also think the man reading the boring article about taxes had the same effect. It enhanced Chase's desperation.

 

The sound did seem a little off sometimes but that's probably because they were still learning the best place to put the microphones. It reminded me of "Singing in the Rain" when they couldn't figure out where to put the microphones. I had heard all the things they tried were actual attempts (and failures) as told to them by people who lived through the era

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1. How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)? Definite exaggeration in facial reaction, physical in getting squirted in the face (but not as physical for sure as clips we say in the silent movies), repetitive - with the squirt scenes, make believe (a bit more realistic, but man reading newspaper while he is shaving is not all that realistic), does not seem to meet criteria for painful/violent - squirt in eye is inconvenient, but not necessarily painful and not really violent, compared again to the knock 'em down and out variety as seen in the silent clips.


2. Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?" Not familiar with Chase, so another new bonus of this course!  As for Mast description, tend to relate more to this part of his analysis - "he(Chase) is more cranky, more fastidious and fussy, more irritable."  Didn't feel the exasperation in the scene although did notice the fussy and fastidious component of Chase.  More will be revealed I am sure when watch the entire film.


3. As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?  Seems apparent in the clip that there is still a learning curve on the use of sound and music.  Music in the scene seems background, almost like when piano was played in the theatre in some of early silent movies.  Sound effects are not used to heighten the comedic effect.


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1. How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

I’m thinking that the fact that virtually everything Charlie needs to clean up his act (the perfume dispensing machine and the display of shaving paraphernalia) is readily available can be taken as an element of both exaggeration and make believe.  I don’t see anything especially physically demanding here, but Chase’s pantomimic skills are certainly required.  The background music could be considered repetitive/ritualistic, since this is the exact same music that we hear in many Hal Roach films from this period. The element of make believe is best expressed when first Chase and then Thelma Todd each look right at the camera.  Chase seems to be saying, “See, I fooled that machine.”  Todd seems to be indicating that this whole thing is just silly.  The closest we get to violent content is when Charlie balls up his fist as if he wants to strike the woman who was his previous blind date from Pittsburg.

 

2. Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?"

 

I don’t see anything here that is challenging to Mast’s description; and, yes, I do get a sense of Chase’s use of exasperation.

 

3. As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

I think that the gags here still primarily make use of pantomime.  The only gag related narrative is the man reading the newspaper in the background, which does add to the shaving gag.  Although that gag would still be funny in a silent film.

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1.       Some elements from “The Pip from Pittsburg” are exaggerated, such as when he draws his fist back as if to hit his former love interest (that’s also an example of potential painful/violent), though most of it is fairly realistic. His “talks” to the viewer (like Hal Roach-mate Oliver Hardy) to surreally connect us with his point of view. In terms of make believe, later in the film, Charley is able to change clothes with other men on the dance floor during brief blackouts, and in this clip setting up the shaving sequence is non-realistic (but good comedy). Repetition figures into the gag where the water squirts out of the wall hanging. I appreciate knowing the proposed “five conditions” of slapstick; I’ve been considering them as I watch the various films in this series.

2.       Mast does a good job of describing Charley Chase’s screen persona. He’s not as easy to love as Harold Lloyd, whose characters almost always want to “do right.” Charley’s characters are more selfish and condescending (“exasperation” is part of it), which actually connect him more with modern comedians such as Steve Martin and (as someone already noted) Jim Carrey.

3.       It’s surprising that sound isn’t used here to punch the slapstick, as it was for other Hal Roach shorts by Our Gang and Laurel & Hardy. As another poster pointed out, this sounds like the “something funny’s going on” music from those other Roach series.

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First of all, I was very excited to see Charley Chase included in this course! I have only seen a couple of his films, but thought he was fantastic in them. If anyone is interested, here's a link to a particularly great one, called His Wooden Wedding: 

 

1. The slapstick humor was far more subtle here than in any of the silents we watched.The exaggeration was more in the creative ways he tried to spruce himself up, rather than in gestures or physical movements, though there was absolutely a certain physicality to Chase's humor (getting squirted in the eye, punch spilling from a cup). Chase had to make several attempts with the flower squirter, which provides repetitiveness. More importantly, in my opinion, is the fact that making multiple attempts at something is a strategy used over and over again by other slapstick comedians (think Keaton pulling the piano into the house in One Week), giving a ritualistic aspect to the film. I didn't find make believe or violence incredibly prevalent in this clip, as the gags were pretty tame and fairly realistic (except perhaps the reflective jacket!).

 

2. I definitely agree that Chase's greatest emotion is exasperation. We do see him express other feelings, such as satisfaction, but he seems particularly talented at expressing exasperation.

 

3. The sound in this clip was impressive for 1931! The sound effects realistically matched what was happening in the gags, the music sounded great and worked well with the scene, and the volume of the dialogue was at a good level. So many early talkies did not utilize music, so it was nice to see some here.

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1. This clip has two conditions that make it a slapstick gag, and it is subtle, the repetitive/ritualistic approach of the perfume machine to clean up his breath and the squirting of the eye and mouth to cleanse it from the garlic smell and taste. The exaggeration is the use of the shaving kit when he tries to make himself look dashing and handsome for his date Thelma Todd, when he tries to ask a customer to read the portion of the newspaper since he had to fake his nearsightedness. 

 

2. Yes. Mast's description of Chase as having an emotion of exasperation is present in the clip when he sees his blind date the pip from pittsburgh clearly from his face, and Chases' characterization that Mast has described is quite accurate since he does have a cantankerous attitude with an irritating quality for his emotional aspect. 

 

3. The scene works wonderfully to provide the nightlife with piano music, and the orchestra in the background playing popular tunes of the decade, the sound effects which are albeit natural and not artificial provide some authenticity to the gags such as the squirting sounds and the rustling of the newspaper. It is a wonderful talking picture and I hope to see it on TCM.

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1. How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

I'd say 4 out of 5 ain't bad, but I'm scratching my head on the painful/violent trait unless you consider the mentally challenged spritzed in the eye gag...

 

2. Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?"

 

I think I need more context but he does display some exasperation. Things seem to click for him and what's weird is she's privy to it the whole time :)

 

3. As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

For its time rather well however this in my little-to-no experience with Charley Chase I'd say he had better routines. I hope so anyways...

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1. How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

The elements are all there. His acting is exaggerated in trying to hide his garlic breath from his date. It is there when he tries to mask the garlic. No matter where he aligns his mouth, the perfume machine squirts him in the face. He is physical in his attempt to get perfumed. Not having seen a Chase film before i am not sure what is repetitive about him. But the fact that everything he needs to clean up is there so that may be his ritual.It was make believe to get the guy to read the paper for him and to shave seeing his reflection on the other mans coat. There was a hint of violent when the pip walks off with him showing restraint in not hitting her. Although I had hope he would have.

 

2. Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?"

 

Chase was definitely exasperated in his reaction to things happening around him. From the perfume machine to shaving on the fly/

3. As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

The gags would work in either media. There were the five elements needed to be slapstick.

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1.       Some elements from “The Pip from Pittsburg” are exaggerated, such as when he draws his fist back as if to hit his former love interest (that’s also an example of potential painful/violent), though most of it is fairly realistic. His “talks” to the viewer (like Hal Roach-mate Oliver Hardy) to surreally connect us with his point of view. In terms of make believe, later in the film, Charley is able to change clothes with other men on the dance floor during brief blackouts, and in this clip setting up the shaving sequence is non-realistic (but good comedy). Repetition figures into the gag where the water squirts out of the wall hanging. I appreciate knowing the proposed “five conditions” of slapstick; I’ve been considering them as I watch the various films in this series.

2.       Mast does a good job of describing Charley Chase’s screen persona. He’s not as easy to love as Harold Lloyd, whose characters almost always want to “do right.” Charley’s characters are more selfish and condescending (“exasperation” is part of it), which actually connect him more with modern comedians such as Steve Martin and (as someone already noted) Jim Carrey.

3.       It’s surprising that sound isn’t used here to punch the slapstick, as it was for other Hal Roach shorts by Our Gang and Laurel & Hardy. As another poster pointed out, this sounds like the “something funny’s going on” music from those other Roach series.

 

In reference to your comments about utilizing sound for Our Gang; I recall the exact same music being used in a number of Our Gang shorts.

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DD #5 'CLEANING UP HIS ACT: Charley Chase

 

1) How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of Slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

I think 'The Pip from Pittsburgh' uses all 5 conditions of Slapstick..Chase not wanting to make the same mistake twice when it comes to his blind date, goes overboard in trying to get out of his 'Blind date'. Seeing that his 'blind date' is a knock out Chase precedes to 'doll himself up' (seeing a display of a shaving kit, Chase gets aid of a stranger by asking him to read the newspaper for him (Chase pretended to leave his glasses home so the stranger blocks Chase by reading out loud the newspaper, while this is happening Chase shaves). The physical & repetitiveness of Chase going back & forth getting sprayed w/perfume to mask the garlic smell on his breath, going up to people & speaking in people's faces to get their reaction to his breath. Make believe part is using the 2nd stranger as a mirror (while the 1st stranger is blocking his Chases' way, Chase uses another stranger next to him (who's back is turned) as a mirror to shave...the 2nd stranger's suit jacket's back is 'shiny' like a mirror. The painful part of the clip..Chase 'assaulting' people with his breath (which having put money into a machine, Chase gets squirted w/garlic in the face & eventually in the mouth.

 

2) Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is 'exasperation'?

 

I agree with Mast on both parts of the question...Chase 'defending himself' against his date (having seen one of his previous dates in the lobby) in the clip by getting sprayed all over with perfume (which masks the garlic breath he has) and saying that Chase is exasperating is an understatement...his over the top actions such as rushing around trying to get funky to get out of his date and then overreacting when he sees his date is real a 'hot tomato' by primping himself in a crazy manner by having strangers be his accomplices in getting pretty for his date.

 

3) As an early talkie that is transitioning from the 'silent film era', how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

Surprisingly everything & everybody are all in sync. I've often seen early talkie movies not match up with either the sound (like a car backfiring) or the actors dialogue not in sync. So 'The Pip from Pittsburgh's' director and film editor did a great job with this film.

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Chase's comedy, as shown in this clip, is certainly exaggerated, ritualistic (the music background helps in this) and, although his actions aren't something you see every day, they seem to fit with the plot in a realistic way. His face expressions dominate the screen.

 

Chase's character is different from the ones the famous silent stars played because he's not exactly the hero, but rather an everyday character with his pros and cons who tries to survive as best as he can, often acting in a selfish way. Here, we watch him disturb many innocent bystanders trying to clean himself up in order to be presentable to Thelma Todd, the gorgeous first lady of classic slapstick. His characters resemble more those of Groucho Marx and W.C. Fields, rather than Chaplin's or Keaton's. The very first time I watched a scene of his was in the classic Laurel & Hardy comedy Sons of the Desert, when he portrays a similar character which fits perfectly to the famous duo's humor.

 

As was the case with Laurel and Hardy, Chase was a silent comedian who knew how to use sound in order to make his gags funnier and more sophisticated. Both the dialogue (especially when Charley makes a guy read him a newspaper article and he never stops even when his cause is completed) and the music and sound effects offer him an extra tool. In this clip, and his sound film career altogether, Chase doesn't depend on sound (the gags would be funny without it) but uses it to add new aspects to his comedy.

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It appears that they are attempting to utilize all the elements of slapstick but are struggling to balance the physicality with the sound. Sometimes there are classic gags such as the water in the eye but in other areas they are attempting to experiment with things that will play better with audio without really knowing what will hit.

 

Charlie does use exasperation quite a bit and that continues to generate laughs through the modern age (one of the best is Jason Alexander as George Constanza in Seinfeld). Again, Charlie tones down some of the exaggerated expressions from his silent days in a push to modernize and I believe for the most part it plays well.

 

Clearly as others have stated, the integration of sound was challenging and needed to go through a period of experimentation to determine what worked both for laughs and for the practicality of recording/playback. I am curious to know how stock music was received by the audiences of the time. Did it get old hearing the same music in multiple films or was it simply accepted. The practice still occurs today (to a lesser extent) but I view it as lazy or as a cost cutting effort that is less satisfying.

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1. How well do the slapstick elements of this clip match up with the five conditions of slapstick proposed in Module 1 (exaggerated, physical, repetitive/ritualistic, make believe, painful/violent)?

 

I think there are only two conditions met, make believe in the shaving scene and repetitive/ritualistic in the squirt in the eye scene.

 

2. Do you find the clip confirming or challenging Gerald Mast's description of Charley Chase? Even in a short clip, do you get the sense that his greatest emotion is "exasperation?"

 

I agree with Mast. I was exasperated watching the clip. Chase just sighs and purses his lips, shakes his fist and that's the extent of his outrage or even acceptance of the bowl of pits life hands to him. Unlike the Little Tramp's subversion, Keaton's stone face and Lloyd's dogged optimism, Chase is a pale comparison. I just don't see much humor in this clip. Perhaps seeing it in the context of the entire film will help. I'm trying, like Lloyd, to remain optimistic.

 

3. As an early talkie that is transitioning from the "silent film era," how well do you think this scene uses synchronous sound and music in the construction of its gags?

 

It's the one bright spot. The dialogue and sound effects are extremely well synched and the background music is passable, though even at the time a bit too formulaic. Perhaps in an attempt to remind the audience that even though a, "talkie" one with a familiar and much beloved lineage.

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I appreciated "checking (other classmate's) notes" on this one, as the only slapstick comedian named Chase I was ever familiar with was Chevy.   This is certainly fulfilling one of the major reasons I had for taking this course: broadening my knowledge of Slapstick comedy.  Having twice watched the clip, however, I must say I'm somewhat challenged to see what many of you are seeing:

 

1.  There's barely any exaggeration in Chase's actions, IMHO, just very quick thinking.  The "perfume machine gag"  was homage to Chaplin (who I seem to remember doing in a similar situation), but a poor choice to repeat. His ingenious use of what was at hand seemed perfectly plausible--hardly an argument for make-believe.  Physicality abounded, however, and Chase's tension/irritation seemed to verge on violence, as he were willing to do anything to improve his situation. 

 

2."Chase has much less dash, zip, and fervor; he is more cranky, more fastidious and fussy, more irritable." While I found this part of Mr. Mast's description of Chase to be dead on, "irritability" would never have come to my mind watching this particular performance, had I not read the discussion points beforehand.

 

3. Sound was used to great effect here, as the article read was a brilliant counterpoint to the situation.  The "perfume machine gag," would not have had quite so much comic appeal if we had not heard the many failures, as well as the final success.

 

That being said, I was curious to know:  several postings mentioned the "Our Gang (Little Rascals)" series--did Chase appear in those shorts as the exasperated Father?
 

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Well how do you like that. I have never seen or heard of Charley Chase. Indeed he is one exasperated fellow. In the scene where he was trying to swallow the perfume spray? He almost had the mannerisms of an Oliver Hardy. Little bit little bit . It was funny. The voices were synced up well. I really didn't notice anything otherwise. The sound was synced up just fine with the music. Definitely slapstick gags. And it was fun being that it was a new talkie gag for them to use: a man who was reading the newspaper for him while he was shaving. It was a funny bit. And a nice surprise to be introduced to Charley Chase.

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