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slaytonf

The Music Box (1932): The Most Perfect Movie Ever Made

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On Sunday, May 13, 2018 at 11:51 PM, spence said:

Another category that the took home, among of course with *Roach-(think he got the statue though that there in a no shape nor form will have again, no heavyewights like them, *Chaplin, *Keaton, Lloyd, Marx Brothers, W.C. Fields, Bud Abbott & Lou Costello & yes, lowbrow, but I love The Three Stooges shorts-(l934-59) only & Joe Besser makes me ill! Once they did the more kid friendly stuff with Curly Joe DeRita they got dull

You just named every great Golden age comedy team. They're all great, they just knew how to do comedy better back in the old days. They just can't do comedy anymore like the above mentioned stars, most modern comedy is either stupid and annoying or gross toilet humor. Where are the modern Marx brothers, Laurel and Hardys, and Abbott and Costellos? And the Buster Keatens, Three stooges, and W.C. Fields?

There were a couple of things in the late 1930s that had some annoying stupidness. One example was in "Gold diggers Paris", those band players, the annoying faces they made while playing their instruments, their stupid behavior, then Hugh Hubert's dumb acting in that film, he started becoming irritating in the late 1930s, he was better earlier on such as his character Ezra Ounce in "Dames", which was a much better film than "Gold diggers Paris".

Fortunately, the stupid comedy back then was the minority and the great ones were the majority, much more so than today.

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On 9/13/2016 at 10:29 PM, slaytonf said:

Like a masterwork by Bach.  The exposition of a theme, and its variations, is unequaled for the way it presents its proposition, and elaborates its corollaries.  Elegant, spare, with not an unnecessary stunt, or missed bit of business.  The comedy is not solely visual.  The best of the aural humor are the sounds the piano makes bouncing down the steps.  For all of its ostensibly broad humor, it has sly, witty, and satiric undercurrents.

I'm sure Godel, Escher and Bach would all agree!

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On 9/15/2016 at 4:35 PM, TomJH said:

 

johnny-carson-underwear-as-baby-ed-mcmah

 

"Well, here's another fine mess you got me in."

Carson does often use some of Ollie's [or Babe as old friends called him] physicality, vocal mannerisms and the playing with the tie bit, to emulate him.

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My favorite Laurel and Hardy film is probably Beau Hunks. It's also the longest of their "shorts" at 37 minutes and is almost the length of some feature length movies of that time period! 

Image result for beau hunks 1931

The funniest part imo is the finale where Laurel and Hardy have some fun with grenades and beat the Riffs.

Image result for beau hunks 1931

This was also apparently Hal Roach's favorite of the L&H films but for a much different reason. From Wikipedia-

Hal Roach's Favorite Movie[edit]

In January 1992, seven days after Hal Roach celebrated his hundredth birthday, the centenarian appeared as a guest on The Tonight Show. Jay Leno was subbing for host Johnny Carson that night. When Leno asked Roach which of the movies he had made was his favorite, he selected Beau Hunks. Roach said it was strictly because "leading lady" Jean Harlow--who had started at Roach's studio but had moved on to become a huge star at RKO Pictures--appeared in Beau Hunks for nothing. Of course Harlow "appeared" in the film only through old publicity photographs from the Roach archives.

~

Related image

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On 5/4/2018 at 2:05 PM, Allenex said:

Yes. I have noticed how Hardy will look straight at the camera (at us) sometimes, usually when he's about to make his next move on someone.

Or when his plans are foiled. From Blotto~

Image result for blotto oliver hardy

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29 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

My favorite Laurel and Hardy film is probably Beau Hunks. It's also the longest of their "shorts" at 37 minutes and is almost the length of some feature length movies of that time period! 

Image result for beau hunks 1931

The funniest part imo is the finale where Laurel and Hardy have some fun with grenades and beat the Riffs.

Image result for beau hunks 1931

This was also apparently Hal Roach's favorite of the L&H films but for a much different reason. From Wikipedia-

Hal Roach's Favorite Movie[edit]

In January 1992, seven days after Hal Roach celebrated his hundredth birthday, the centenarian appeared as a guest on The Tonight Show. Jay Leno was subbing for host Johnny Carson that night. When Leno asked Roach which of the movies he had made was his favorite, he selected Beau Hunks. Roach said it was strictly because "leading lady" Jean Harlow--who had started at Roach's studio but had moved on to become a huge star at RKO Pictures--appeared in Beau Hunks for nothing. Of course Harlow "appeared" in the film only through old publicity photographs from the Roach archives.

~

Related image

Beau Hunks was hilarious. So was Tip for tat, Oliver the eighth, We faw down, Another fine mess, Our wife, Below zero, Their first mistake, County hospital, Busy buddies, Hog play, Chickens come home, and many others. All of their silents and most of their talking shorts. Some of their feature lengths were great too such as Flying dueces, Blockheads, Boheimian girl, and Swiss miss were great too. It was in the 1940s when they lost their touch. When the comedy stopped revolving around the two of them and their antics with each other and their rivals, and when they became side characters to someone else's plot, which was everything after Saps at sea in 1940. The two of them stopped fighting so much after that film. That hurt things, a lot of their comedy revolved around their fighting, Laurel's blundering mistakes leading to Ollie's tripping, falling, getting hit on head with something, etc. All that stopped being in the way it was before the 1940s. 

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I must confess in two years I had never once looked at this thread because I thought it was about the 1989 film with Jessica Lange and Armin Mueller-Stahl. Finally tonight I was like man what on earth was so amazing about that film that people are still talking about it? Curiosity finally got the better of me.

Never mind ...

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This thread is from the days before I included the year of the movie with the title.  I hope such regrettable confusion will no longer occur.

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On ‎5‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 1:09 PM, Allenex said:

You just named every great Golden age comedy team. They're all great, they just knew how to do comedy better back in the old days. They just can't do comedy anymore like the above mentioned stars, most modern comedy is either stupid and annoying or gross toilet humor. Where are the modern Marx brothers, Laurel and Hardys, and Abbott and Costellos? And the Buster Keatens, Three stooges, and W.C. Fields?

There were a couple of things in the late 1930s that had some annoying stupidness. One example was in "Gold diggers Paris", those band players, the annoying faces they made while playing their instruments, their stupid behavior, then Hugh Hubert's dumb acting in that film, he started becoming irritating in the late 1930s, he was better earlier on such as his character Ezra Ounce in "Dames", which was a much better film than "Gold diggers Paris".

Fortunately, the stupid comedy back then was the minority and the great ones were the majority, much more so than today.

Remember Olson & Johnson?

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Ha ha well now future generations will think I was too much of a dummy to see the year of release included in the thread title! When Allenex revives this thread again in 2030 ...

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You can comfort yourself with the knowledge of the countless others you have saved from a similar embarrassment. 

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On Monday, May 21, 2018 at 10:03 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Ha ha well now future generations will think I was too much of a dummy to see the year of release included in the thread title! When Allenex revives this thread again in 2030 ...

If I'm still alive by then, lol. I've brought a lot of these posts on 1930s films back to life. There are only so many of us users on this forum, and there are sadly not a high percentage of people today in 2018 who are into 1930s films and music. 1930s things are too old fashioned to most younger and even middle aged people today who just cannot relate enough to the ways of the era to find anything from that era funny, interesting, or enjoyable. Every now and again though are people like us who found an appreciation for the era and a keen interest in it. It doesn't matter to us if we were born after that time period, we've still found something about the era which has really attracted our interests, where the majority of people are not able to develop an interest in a time period which ended before they existed. That's why the higher percentage of today's population under 70 to 80 are not interested in 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s films and music.

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On ‎9‎/‎13‎/‎2016 at 10:29 PM, slaytonf said:

Like a masterwork by Bach.  The exposition of a theme, and its variations, is unequaled for the way it presents its proposition, and elaborates its corollaries.  Elegant, spare, with not an unnecessary stunt, or missed bit of business.  The comedy is not solely visual.  The best of the aural humor are the sounds the piano makes bouncing down the steps.  For all of its ostensibly broad humor, it has sly, witty, and satiric undercurrents.

The almost visual jazz is they were just coming off the silent era comedy

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On ‎5‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 8:36 AM, Allenex said:

Beau Hunks was hilarious. So was Tip for tat, Oliver the eighth, We faw down, Another fine mess, Our wife, Below zero, Their first mistake, County hospital, Busy buddies, Hog play, Chickens come home, and many others. All of their silents and most of their talking shorts. Some of their feature lengths were great too such as Flying dueces, Blockheads, Boheimian girl, and Swiss miss were great too. It was in the 1940s when they lost their touch. When the comedy stopped revolving around the two of them and their antics with each other and their rivals, and when they became side characters to someone else's plot, which was everything after Saps at sea in 1940. The two of them stopped fighting so much after that film. That hurt things, a lot of their comedy revolved around their fighting, Laurel's blundering mistakes leading to Ollie's tripping, falling, getting hit on head with something, etc. All that stopped being in the way it was before the 1940s. 

& *ROACH (won the *ACADEMY AWARD for it & THE THREE STOOGES were up for same category, but lost for 1934's MEN IN BLACK) Most don't know the legendary name of *Oscar did not start until '35 though 8yrs into them

Appeared at the *0scars just prior to dying in '92 at 100 & Billy Crystal did yet another great improv when *HAL stood up to speak from audience & the mike went out & Billy said it was perfect because he was mostly a silent era filmmaker

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